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Old 06-13-2008, 09:25 AM
David
 
Default making bootup fsck more user-friendly

Hi list.

I already checked this problem with Google and with my LUG, and would
like to ask on this mailing list before I fire off a bunch of feature
requests in the Debian BTS.

===== FROM MAIL TO MY LUG =====

I've tried Googling for this but haven't found much info, so asking here.

Every X days or Y reboots, Linux (on my home PC, which I boot & shut
down 2x each day) wants to scan partitions for errors at startup.
While this is a bit annoying (can't use the PC for 10-20 minutes), I
usually let it finish and read a book while waiting.

But at other times I want to use the PC quickly for something, and
waiting for fsck to finish isn't an option. The problem is, hitting
Ctrl+C in the middle of boot fsck leaves your root partition in
read-only mode, and the machine has a lot of boot problems, and takes
a long time. I've tried this a few times this morning when I was in a
hurry (reboot, ctrl+c during fsck, hit boot problems so reboot again),
but in the end was forced to let fsck finish.

Is there a way to interrupt the bootup fsck 'cleanly', so that it will
remount read/write, and retry the next time you boot?

Even better would be a way to get fsck to run in the background after
you're already logged into KDE. Maybe not to actually fix problems (I
understand this is hard to do in r/w mode, while being actively used,
for technical reasons), but at leat to flag them for the next 'real'
fsck so they can be checked and fixed quickly then if they aren't
bogus...

Any suggestions?

===== A FEW (TRIMMED FOR BREVITY) REPLIES FROM MY LUG POST =====

On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 10:08 AM, Morgan Collett
<morgan.collett@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Ubuntu 8.04 / hardy supports cancelling the fsck on boot cleanly with
> Esc (or is it Ctrl-C? I haven't tried it myself.)
>
> You can change the number of boots:
> http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=5050801&postcount=14
>
> You can change it to once a month:
> http://martin.ankerl.com/2007/11/03/howto-change-ubuntu-forced-fsck/
>
> You can try AutoFsck which does the fsck on shutdown instead:
> http://micrux.net/?p=52 AT YOUR OWN RISK of course...
>

---

On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 10:12 AM, Deon Bredenhann
<deon1@propellerheads.co.za> wrote:
> If you leave the box on or running through the night, just force an fsck
> once a week.
>
> Have a cron entry at 2 in the morning run 'shutdown -F -r now'
> This will reboot and force fsck to run. If you do this on a weekly base,
> you will most likely not run into the I'm-in-a-hurry-now problem. Would
> like to know what other solutions people have out there.

---

On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 10:12 AM, Liam Smit <liam.smit@gmail.com> wrote:
> I'd suggest increasing the number of reboots between file system
> checks. Have a look at tune2fs.
>
> A more drastic approach would be to change to a different file system
> which does not require such frequent fsck.
>
>> Is there a way to interrupt the bootup fsck 'cleanly', so that it will
>> remount read/write, and retry the next time you boot?
>
> Probably not once it's running i.e. there is an element of risk
> involved in stopping a running fsck. Rather prevent it from starting.
>
>> Even better would be a way to get fsck to run in the background after
>> you're already logged into KDE. Maybe not to actually fix problems (I
>> understand this is hard to do in r/w mode, while being actively used,
>> for technical reasons), but at leat to flag them for the next 'real'
>> fsck so they can be checked and fixed quickly then if they aren't
>> bogus...
>
> That would probably corrupt the file system being checked unless it
> was first unmounted.

==========

I researched the options they mentioned, and I'm not happy with the
situation (at least with Debian Unstable, I don't use Ubuntu).

I want to submit these feature requests, but first I'd like some
feedback from this list before I do so:

sysvinit:

- When it's time (during startup)to run a full fsck, give the user a
few seconds to hit ESC before running them

- /sbin/shutdown allows the user to (any of these would help):
* Force a fsck during the restart (-rF), and then to shut down the system.
* Force a fsck during shutdown, after drives have been unmounted
+ But only if an fsck is due the next time the machine boots?

e2fsprogs:

- fsck allows the user to abort cleanly with ESC (fsck will be
retried on the next boot)

- ability for a readonly fsck on a r/w filesystem to gather info to
make a later fsck on the filesystem as r/o to find and fix problems
faster.

David.


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Old 06-13-2008, 11:12 AM
Johannes Wiedersich
 
Default making bootup fsck more user-friendly

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On 2008-06-13 11:25, David wrote:
> Hi list.
>
> I already checked this problem with Google and with my LUG, and would
> like to ask on this mailing list before I fire off a bunch of feature
> requests in the Debian BTS.
>
> ===== FROM MAIL TO MY LUG =====
>
> I've tried Googling for this but haven't found much info, so asking here.
>
> Every X days or Y reboots, Linux (on my home PC, which I boot & shut
> down 2x each day) wants to scan partitions for errors at startup.
> While this is a bit annoying (can't use the PC for 10-20 minutes), I
> usually let it finish and read a book while waiting.

read 'man tune2fs' for some tips for setting interval and mount count to
something that better meets your needs.

> But at other times I want to use the PC quickly for something, and
> waiting for fsck to finish isn't an option. The problem is, hitting
> Ctrl+C in the middle of boot fsck leaves your root partition in
> read-only mode, and the machine has a lot of boot problems, and takes
> a long time. I've tried this a few times this morning when I was in a
> hurry (reboot, ctrl+c during fsck, hit boot problems so reboot again),
> but in the end was forced to let fsck finish.

Ctrl-C worked without problems the last time I tried on my debian lenny.

> Is there a way to interrupt the bootup fsck 'cleanly', so that it will
> remount read/write, and retry the next time you boot?

Works for me on lenny.

> Even better would be a way to get fsck to run in the background after
> you're already logged into KDE.

Does not work cleanly, because the filesystem has to be unmounted for
fsck'ing properly.

Maybe not to actually fix problems (I
> understand this is hard to do in r/w mode, while being actively used,
> for technical reasons), but at leat to flag them for the next 'real'
> fsck so they can be checked and fixed quickly then if they aren't
> bogus...
>
> Any suggestions?

Set your mount count and intervals apropriately for your needs. You
could also fsck manually (shuttdown's -F option), whenever it suits you,
eg. disable automatic checking and only check manually.

It all depends on how important your data are and how good your backups!

There are other OSs that don't have regular automatic file system
checks. On the other hand, I've never lost any data on a linux box
without hardware defects, while I've often seen data loss on Wind0w$,
even though the hard disk still worked after a repartitioning. YMMV.

> I researched the options they mentioned, and I'm not happy with the
> situation (at least with Debian Unstable, I don't use Ubuntu).
>
> I want to submit these feature requests, but first I'd like some
> feedback from this list before I do so:
>
> sysvinit:
>
> - When it's time (during startup)to run a full fsck, give the user a
> few seconds to hit ESC before running them
>
> - /sbin/shutdown allows the user to (any of these would help):
> * Force a fsck during the restart (-rF), and then to shut down the system.

Does not work for me, because I want to shut down the computer
completely, not just waste all that power with standby mode. I.e. if you
want to turn off the power supply completely, shutdown is not enough,
YOU have to switch off manually.

> * Force a fsck during shutdown, after drives have been unmounted
> + But only if an fsck is due the next time the machine boots?

Won't work, IIRC. Even the autofsck you mention checks after boot not
before shutdown.

> e2fsprogs:
>
> - fsck allows the user to abort cleanly with ESC (fsck will be
> retried on the next boot)

Works with Ctrl-c (the last time I tried on lenny).

> - ability for a readonly fsck on a r/w filesystem to gather info to
> make a later fsck on the filesystem as r/o to find and fix problems
> faster.

Do you have some technical expertise on how to implement this? I doubt
that the ext3 developpers overlooked that, if there was a good technical
solution....


YMMV, take care,

Johannes


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Old 06-13-2008, 11:38 AM
David
 
Default making bootup fsck more user-friendly

Hi and thanks for your reply.

On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 1:12 PM, Johannes Wiedersich
<johannes@physik.blm.tu-muenchen.de> wrote:
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA1
>
> On 2008-06-13 11:25, David wrote:

[...]

> read 'man tune2fs' for some tips for setting interval and mount count to
> something that better meets your needs.

This isn't a solution for me. I want fsck to run regularly, but to
still have a way to by-pass it when I need to. Making fsck run less
frequently will leave me with the same problem. eg every 100th boot I
will still have to wait 10-20 minutes before I can start using the PC,
which is a royal PITA.

> Ctrl-C worked without problems the last time I tried on my debian lenny.
>

I tested this on 2 Sid boxes, both had the problem. In the past (with
Testing & Stable) hitting Ctrl-C will randomly either leave the
partition read-only, or will re-mount it in write mode.

I think that in my case:

Hitting Ctrl+C breaks *both* fsck, and the script that started it
which is meant to re-mount read-write after fsck (failed or
successful)

And in your case:

Hitting Ctrl+C breaks fsck, but the calling script is not interrupted,
so it does remount the partition as read/write.

Possibly in my Sid systems, the system is more reponsive to Ctrl+C.

Which suggests another feature request for the sysvinit package:

- Don't terminate if the user breaks fsck with Ctrl+C. The user
should hit Ctrl+C twice if he wants to stop fsck & the script which
called it (and which is supposed to remount with read/write after the
fsck).

>
> Set your mount count and intervals apropriately for your needs. You
> could also fsck manually (shuttdown's -F option), whenever it suits you,
> eg. disable automatic checking and only check manually.

This is a pain. I would need to find time when I'm not using the PC,
but still want it to be on, which is not often. I like to turn off my
PC when I'm not using it, and to not have to wait for it when I do
want to use it.

>>
>> - /sbin/shutdown allows the user to (any of these would help):
>> * Force a fsck during the restart (-rF), and then to shut down the system.
>
> Does not work for me, because I want to shut down the computer
> completely, not just waste all that power with standby mode. I.e. if you
> want to turn off the power supply completely, shutdown is not enough,
> YOU have to switch off manually.
>

I think this depends on hardware. Most of my boxes shut down
completely when I run 'shutdown -P'. But there are a few (maybe old
kernel) which go into stand-by mode even when I really want shutdown
to power it off.

If shutdown isn't meant to work this way, then why does it have a -P option?

>
>> - ability for a readonly fsck on a r/w filesystem to gather info to
>> make a later fsck on the filesystem as r/o to find and fix problems
>> faster.
>
> Do you have some technical expertise on how to implement this? I doubt
> that the ext3 developpers overlooked that, if there was a good technical
> solution....

Might be because ext3 devs are mainly focused on servers which are
turned on 24/7 & rarely rebooted. The kind of feature I'd like would
be more useful for desktop users.

David.


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Old 06-13-2008, 03:02 PM
Johannes Wiedersich
 
Default making bootup fsck more user-friendly

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On 2008-06-13 13:38, David wrote:
> On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 1:12 PM, Johannes Wiedersich
> <johannes@physik.blm.tu-muenchen.de> wrote:
>> read 'man tune2fs' for some tips for setting interval and mount count to
>> something that better meets your needs.
>
> This isn't a solution for me. I want fsck to run regularly, but to
> still have a way to by-pass it when I need to. Making fsck run less
> frequently will leave me with the same problem. eg every 100th boot I
> will still have to wait 10-20 minutes before I can start using the PC,
> which is a royal PITA.

So basically you want to have the check without having to wait for the
check to finish. I don't know, how you want this to be accomplished.
Either the check runs automatically or you have to run it manually.

>> Ctrl-C worked without problems the last time I tried on my debian lenny.
>>
>
> I tested this on 2 Sid boxes, both had the problem. In the past (with
> Testing & Stable) hitting Ctrl-C will randomly either leave the
> partition read-only, or will re-mount it in write mode.

OK, I checked again. Ctrl-C works for /home but not for / . So, I guess
you would have to move your data to another partition. I have a rather
small / partition, so fsck is fast and I probably never have interrupted
it up to now. My /home partition is large, takes a long time to fsck and
I haven't had problems interrupting it in order to have it checked next
time. Again, since the feature works for other partitions than / , I'd
guess that there is a good reason why it isn't implemented for / .
(Maybe I'm wrong. Is there someone out there who knows better?)

>> Set your mount count and intervals apropriately for your needs. You
>> could also fsck manually (shuttdown's -F option), whenever it suits you,
>> eg. disable automatic checking and only check manually.
>
> This is a pain. I would need to find time when I'm not using the PC,
> but still want it to be on, which is not often. I like to turn off my
> PC when I'm not using it, and to not have to wait for it when I do
> want to use it.

You cannot reliably fsck / when the computer is on. It either has to be
at boot time or else you have to boot from another / like from a rescue
CD/DVD.

>>> - /sbin/shutdown allows the user to (any of these would help):
>>> * Force a fsck during the restart (-rF), and then to shut down the system.
>> Does not work for me, because I want to shut down the computer
>> completely, not just waste all that power with standby mode. I.e. if you
>> want to turn off the power supply completely, shutdown is not enough,
>> YOU have to switch off manually.
>>
>
> I think this depends on hardware. Most of my boxes shut down
> completely when I run 'shutdown -P'. But there are a few (maybe old
> kernel) which go into stand-by mode even when I really want shutdown
> to power it off.

In my experience *any* computer will be in some kind of standby mode as
long as there is no physical interruption to the power. Some power
supplies don't have a 'physical switch', but that just means that they
will always use a few watts of electricity unless you remove the cord or
put a physical switch between the box and the electrical outlet.

Are all leds of your ethernet off, when the computer is off and there is
a ethernet connection to a router? Newer hardware has some 'wake on lan'
option to boot the computer via ethernet, but of course that means that
the ethernet cards are not off, but on standby -- wasting your
electricity even if you don't want to use 'wake on lan'.

> If shutdown isn't meant to work this way, then why does it have a -P option?

The electronics can not really pull the plug or physically disconnect
from the sockets. It's like with your TV set: it will always be on
standby, if 'switched off' by the remote control. Only a physical
switch, operated by a person will really disconnect the thing from the
mains. Some consumer applications don't have these switches nowadays,
but that just means you have to pull the plug in order to fully power
off :-(

I've even seen some floor lamps that still consume a power of some 10 W
when switched off, because the transformer is still on and has not been
disconnected. Better designs have the power switch between socket and
transformer and _not_ between transformer and light bulb.

>>> - ability for a readonly fsck on a r/w filesystem to gather info to
>>> make a later fsck on the filesystem as r/o to find and fix problems
>>> faster.
>> Do you have some technical expertise on how to implement this? I doubt
>> that the ext3 developpers overlooked that, if there was a good technical
>> solution....
>
> Might be because ext3 devs are mainly focused on servers which are
> turned on 24/7 & rarely rebooted. The kind of feature I'd like would
> be more useful for desktop users.

I guess the defaults are very conservative settings regarding
reliability of your data and were implemented at a time when there was
no journalling for data protection.

As I said before, it depends on the importance of the data and quality,
frequency and reliability of your backups. Another point to consider is
how quick you have to recover, etc.

For what it's worth, I fsck my home after 100 mounts or 6 months. / is
fsck'ed more often, but since it doesn't take long, I just never
bothered. I also have smartmontools checking the health of my disks.

YMMV,

Johannes
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Old 06-13-2008, 03:11 PM
Kamaraju S Kusumanchi
 
Default making bootup fsck more user-friendly

David wrote:

> Every X days or Y reboots, Linux (on my home PC, which I boot & shut
> down 2x each day) wants to scan partitions for errors at startup.
> While this is a bit annoying (can't use the PC for 10-20 minutes), I
> usually let it finish and read a book while waiting.

shutting down 2x times each day seems to be a very inefficient way of
using/managing a desktop PC. Use "software suspend" and hibernate the
machine whenever you want to power down the machine.

Bringing up a machine from an hibernated state is faster than bringing up a
machine from a "shutdown -h now" state. Not only that, it also preserves
the state of the system.

I frequently move across different places (say work, home, lab, etc.,) and
everytime I have to change a location, I just hibernate the machine. Then I
go to the new location, then restart the machine and continue working from
where I left off. This is a really great feature. Once you get used to it,
you will think of how you managed without it for such a long time.

>
> But at other times I want to use the PC quickly for something, and
> waiting for fsck to finish isn't an option.

Precisely. When you want to show a graph/result/chart to your boss, you
can't say "please wait for 10 minutes. My Linux machine is fscking
the /dev/hda1 partition!" :-) Just use the hibernate feature.

Now a days, the only time I do a complete reboot of my laptop is when I had
upgraded the kernel (due to a security upgrade).

hth
raju
--
Kamaraju S Kusumanchi
http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/kk288/
http://malayamaarutham.blogspot.com/


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Old 06-13-2008, 04:32 PM
Johannes Wiedersich
 
Default making bootup fsck more user-friendly

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On 2008-06-13 17:11, Kamaraju S Kusumanchi wrote:
> David wrote:
>
>> Every X days or Y reboots, Linux (on my home PC, which I boot & shut
>> down 2x each day) wants to scan partitions for errors at startup.
>> While this is a bit annoying (can't use the PC for 10-20 minutes), I
>> usually let it finish and read a book while waiting.

[...]

> Now a days, the only time I do a complete reboot of my laptop is when I had
> upgraded the kernel (due to a security upgrade).

In other words, you usually bypass fsck'ing. With respect to fsck it is
about the same as setting the maximum mount count to something close to
infinity.

Johannes

NB: On the other hand, with a journalling FS fsck is probably not as
important as it used to be...
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Old 06-13-2008, 04:53 PM
John Allen
 
Default making bootup fsck more user-friendly

David wrote:

Hi list.

I already checked this problem with Google and with my LUG, and would
like to ask on this mailing list before I fire off a bunch of feature
requests in the Debian BTS.

===== FROM MAIL TO MY LUG =====

I've tried Googling for this but haven't found much info, so asking here.

Every X days or Y reboots, Linux (on my home PC, which I boot & shut
down 2x each day) wants to scan partitions for errors at startup.
While this is a bit annoying (can't use the PC for 10-20 minutes), I
usually let it finish and read a book while waiting.



Use XFS, and it won't fsck when you boot

Well it will, but the fsck.xfs does pretty much nothing.

But at other times I want to use the PC quickly for something, and
waiting for fsck to finish isn't an option. The problem is, hitting
Ctrl+C in the middle of boot fsck leaves your root partition in
read-only mode, and the machine has a lot of boot problems, and takes
a long time. I've tried this a few times this morning when I was in a
hurry (reboot, ctrl+c during fsck, hit boot problems so reboot again),
but in the end was forced to let fsck finish.

Is there a way to interrupt the bootup fsck 'cleanly', so that it will
remount read/write, and retry the next time you boot?

Even better would be a way to get fsck to run in the background after
you're already logged into KDE. Maybe not to actually fix problems (I
understand this is hard to do in r/w mode, while being actively used,
for technical reasons), but at leat to flag them for the next 'real'
fsck so they can be checked and fixed quickly then if they aren't
bogus...

Any suggestions?

===== A FEW (TRIMMED FOR BREVITY) REPLIES FROM MY LUG POST =====

On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 10:08 AM, Morgan Collett
<morgan.collett@gmail.com> wrote:


Ubuntu 8.04 / hardy supports cancelling the fsck on boot cleanly with
Esc (or is it Ctrl-C? I haven't tried it myself.)

You can change the number of boots:
http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=5050801&postcount=14

You can change it to once a month:
http://martin.ankerl.com/2007/11/03/howto-change-ubuntu-forced-fsck/

You can try AutoFsck which does the fsck on shutdown instead:
http://micrux.net/?p=52 AT YOUR OWN RISK of course...




---

On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 10:12 AM, Deon Bredenhann
<deon1@propellerheads.co.za> wrote:


If you leave the box on or running through the night, just force an fsck
once a week.

Have a cron entry at 2 in the morning run 'shutdown -F -r now'
This will reboot and force fsck to run. If you do this on a weekly base,
you will most likely not run into the I'm-in-a-hurry-now problem. Would
like to know what other solutions people have out there.



---

On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 10:12 AM, Liam Smit <liam.smit@gmail.com> wrote:


I'd suggest increasing the number of reboots between file system
checks. Have a look at tune2fs.

A more drastic approach would be to change to a different file system
which does not require such frequent fsck.



Is there a way to interrupt the bootup fsck 'cleanly', so that it will
remount read/write, and retry the next time you boot?


Probably not once it's running i.e. there is an element of risk
involved in stopping a running fsck. Rather prevent it from starting.



Even better would be a way to get fsck to run in the background after
you're already logged into KDE. Maybe not to actually fix problems (I
understand this is hard to do in r/w mode, while being actively used,
for technical reasons), but at leat to flag them for the next 'real'
fsck so they can be checked and fixed quickly then if they aren't
bogus...


That would probably corrupt the file system being checked unless it
was first unmounted.



==========

I researched the options they mentioned, and I'm not happy with the
situation (at least with Debian Unstable, I don't use Ubuntu).

I want to submit these feature requests, but first I'd like some
feedback from this list before I do so:

sysvinit:

- When it's time (during startup)to run a full fsck, give the user a
few seconds to hit ESC before running them

- /sbin/shutdown allows the user to (any of these would help):
* Force a fsck during the restart (-rF), and then to shut down the system.
* Force a fsck during shutdown, after drives have been unmounted
+ But only if an fsck is due the next time the machine boots?

e2fsprogs:

- fsck allows the user to abort cleanly with ESC (fsck will be
retried on the next boot)

- ability for a readonly fsck on a r/w filesystem to gather info to
make a later fsck on the filesystem as r/o to find and fix problems
faster.

David.






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Old 06-13-2008, 04:54 PM
"Douglas A. Tutty"
 
Default making bootup fsck more user-friendly

On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 11:25:23AM +0200, David wrote:
> Every X days or Y reboots, Linux (on my home PC, which I boot & shut
> down 2x each day) wants to scan partitions for errors at startup.
> While this is a bit annoying (can't use the PC for 10-20 minutes), I
> usually let it finish and read a book while waiting.

If you don't have power outages, here is one time where JFS may be of
use (even with IBM's caution, see my recent post in another thread).
JFS was designed to allow a fast fsck on boot so that servers don't
spend a lot of time fscking after a crash.

I don't know if XFS also has this feature.

JFS works very well, is journalling, but like all meta-data-only
journalling filesystems, can loose data if you loose power, although any
filesystem can loose data even with data journalling if the data is in
transit between the kernel and the platter (in a cache somewhere).

Sort answer, read the disk-related HOWTOs and try switching to JFS.

Doug.


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Old 06-13-2008, 05:19 PM
Andrew Sackville-West
 
Default making bootup fsck more user-friendly

On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 05:02:15PM +0200, Johannes Wiedersich wrote:
> On 2008-06-13 13:38, David wrote:
> > On Fri, Jun 13, 2008 at 1:12 PM, Johannes Wiedersich
> > <johannes@physik.blm.tu-muenchen.de> wrote:
> >> read 'man tune2fs' for some tips for setting interval and mount count to
> >> something that better meets your needs.
> >
> > This isn't a solution for me. I want fsck to run regularly, but to
> > still have a way to by-pass it when I need to. Making fsck run less
> > frequently will leave me with the same problem. eg every 100th boot I
> > will still have to wait 10-20 minutes before I can start using the PC,
> > which is a royal PITA.
>
> So basically you want to have the check without having to wait for the
> check to finish. I don't know, how you want this to be accomplished.
> Either the check runs automatically or you have to run it manually.

I think maybe he's looking for an option to *defer* fsck to the next
boot. That is, fsck should accept a particular key stroke to cleanly
stop the fsck, but leave the partition in a state where it will fsck
on the next boot. I personally think this is a pretty good idea in
general, though for me a disaster as I'd just defer fsck every time.

OP could probably tweak the boot scripts to test this idea with a
simple prompt as to whether to proceed with the fsck or defer it.

A
 
Old 06-13-2008, 05:23 PM
Henrique de Moraes Holschuh
 
Default making bootup fsck more user-friendly

On Fri, 13 Jun 2008, Johannes Wiedersich wrote:
> I guess the defaults are very conservative settings regarding
> reliability of your data and were implemented at a time when there was
> no journalling for data protection.

Actually, kernel bugs, memory problems, corruption in the CPU to disk
platter path, and media bitrot are the reasons for which scheduled fsck
exist. Journals don't help or hinder it in any way.

Otherwise, you'd fsck only on unclean shutdown, or after a known
data-trashing event (like an erroneous write access to the raw device, or IO
errors on the device, etc).

--
"One disk to rule them all, One disk to find them. One disk to bring
them all and in the darkness grind them. In the Land of Redmond
where the shadows lie." -- The Silicon Valley Tarot
Henrique Holschuh


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