Linux Archive

Linux Archive (http://www.linux-archive.org/)
-   Debian User (http://www.linux-archive.org/debian-user/)
-   -   swap space on a large system (http://www.linux-archive.org/debian-user/104620-swap-space-large-system.html)

"Mag Gam" 06-11-2008 10:51 AM

swap space on a large system
 
Typically, we create a partition to capture a kernel dump when the system crashes. Therefore, a system with 16GB of RAM will have a partition with 16GB.

How would I scale a system with 64 or 128GB of memory? Any thoughts?



TIA

Ron Johnson 06-11-2008 01:11 PM

swap space on a large system
 
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On 06/11/08 05:51, Mag Gam wrote:
> Typically, we create a partition to capture a kernel dump when the
> system crashes.

How often does that happen?

> Therefore, a system with 16GB of RAM will have a
> partition with 16GB.
>
> How would I scale a system with 64 or 128GB of memory? Any thoughts?

- --
Ron Johnson, Jr.
Jefferson LA USA

"Kittens give Morbo gas. In lighter news, the city of New New
York is doomed."
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.6 (GNU/Linux)

iD8DBQFIT88OS9HxQb37XmcRAogZAKDchpZaZjzgwLvLeeDc1o fFbMw8agCfUh2C
ZtozLVj3dRjC69HSeunuZNk=
=eIw6
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

Luke S Crawford 06-12-2008 01:04 AM

swap space on a large system
 
"Mag Gam" <magawake@gmail.com> writes:

> Typically, we create a partition to capture a kernel dump when the system
> crashes. Therefore, a system with 16GB of RAM will have a partition with
> 16GB.

> How would I scale a system with 64 or 128GB of memory? Any thoughts?

As far as I understand, though, kdump doesn't require you to have a massive
swapfile; it can be configured to dump other places (though personally,
my swap is always at least my ram size for other reasons)

http://lse.sourceforge.net/kdump/

most linux folks, though, don't seem to be that into crash dumps; I know
when I made the jump from FreeBSD to Linux, this was a big shocker for me,
as most of the *BSD shops I've been in, policy was that when something crashed,
you didn't trust that box until you figured out why it crashed (usually
by GDBing the crash dump and/or banging on the hardware)

but the linux folks seem to think that the crash dumps are not so useful.
http://lkml.org/lkml/2007/5/25/267 - and this shows in the support for
crash dumps. - they seem to change the mechanism for collecting system
dumps every year or two. At most of the linux shops I've worked,
it's hard enough to get people to get me serial consoles (which we
then set up to log, so we at least can tell the difference between
the power getting pulled and a MCE) crash dumps are right out. and I
can kinda see why; it's something of a pain in the ass under linux.

Thing is, it was actually useful under *BSD.

But that's my rant, and unquestionably, Mr. Torvalds knows a lot more than
I do, so maybe I should just shut up.


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

"Douglas A. Tutty" 06-13-2008 01:27 AM

swap space on a large system
 
On Wed, Jun 11, 2008 at 06:51:08AM -0400, Mag Gam wrote:
> Typically, we create a partition to capture a kernel dump when the system
> crashes. Therefore, a system with 16GB of RAM will have a partition with
> 16GB.
>
> How would I scale a system with 64 or 128GB of memory? Any thoughts?
>

Bigger hard drive?

Doug.


--
To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-user-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:02 PM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.