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Old 06-06-2008, 08:28 PM
Tenant
 
Default Server install questions

It's a general web server with LAMP - apache, php, mysql, many virtual
web sites, running postfix and so on ...* nothing exotic, no desktop
environment or desktop apps. Since it's Colo, access via SSH only. It
will have 4 GB memory, but there's room to go to 8 GB. I feel no real
reason to go to 64 bit, but if there's no danger with doing so, then I
wouldn't mind it. I guess I'm looking for problem areas.


At 02:49 PM 6/6/2008, you wrote:


32 vs 64 bit is a question that you
really should answer. If you are using applications that are only 32 bit
then be prepared for the changes if you go 64bit. If this is a general
purpose type of server (MySQL, Apache, ect ) then I suggest you go 64bit.
In my world (eg everything that I do) the 64bit MySQL works SOOOOOO much
better then the 32bit version doing the same tasks. Some tasks you may
not notice the difference in the slightest. I also have need of upwards
of 8GB of memory so that obviously influenced my decision to go 64bit as
well.

In my experience, the installer gives you defaults for partitions and I
always took the defaults with no problems ever. These days, with cheaper
and larger drives, things may not be as tight as they were say 5-6 years
ago.



As for the partitioning, I don?t
know what you are doing so I can?t give you anything more then a few
suggestions. I personally always set aside 10GB for /. I also set my swap
space to be 2x the amount of memory or 5GB, whichever is the smallest. If
the box is going to be using a lot of temporary files I will set a large
/tmp partition if need be. If it is a web server, I usually give /var/www
its own partition. I have a few applications that use /opt extensively so
on those systems I give a 10GB /opt. The rest of the space always goes to
/home. It really depends on what you are doing with the
system.

thanks
 
Old 06-06-2008, 09:16 PM
"Stackpole, Chris"
 
Default Server install questions

For a general web server, you shouldn’t
have any problems. As I mentioned before, I was having a hard time with a MySQL
database that is being slammed pretty hard and the move to 64bit was a huge
factor in helping relieve the system. It probably wouldn’t hurt going
with 64 bit just so you have the power when you need it but certainly don’t
stress about it.


*


Take care and enjoy your new server!


*


*










From: Tenant
[mailto:tenant@tenant.net]

Sent: Friday, June 06, 2008 3:29
PM

To: debian-user@lists.debian.org

Subject: Re: Server install
questions




*


It's a general web server with LAMP - apache, php, mysql, many virtual
web sites, running postfix and so on ...* nothing exotic, no desktop
environment or desktop apps. Since it's Colo, access via SSH only. It will have
4 GB memory, but there's room to go to 8 GB. I feel no real reason to go to 64
bit, but if there's no danger with doing so, then I wouldn't mind it. I guess
I'm looking for problem areas.



At 02:49 PM 6/6/2008, you wrote:






32 vs 64 bit is a question that you really should answer. If
you are using applications that are only 32 bit then be prepared for the
changes if you go 64bit. If this is a general purpose type of server (MySQL,
Apache, ect ) then I suggest you go 64bit. In my world (eg everything that I do)
the 64bit MySQL works SOOOOOO much better then the 32bit version doing the same
tasks. Some tasks you may not notice the difference in the slightest. I also
have need of upwards of 8GB of memory so that obviously influenced my decision
to go 64bit as well.




In my experience, the installer gives you defaults for partitions and I always
took the defaults with no problems ever. These days, with cheaper and larger
drives, things may not be as tight as they were say 5-6 years ago.








As for the partitioning, I don’t know what you are
doing so I can’t give you anything more then a few suggestions. I
personally always set aside 10GB for /. I also set my swap space to be 2x the
amount of memory or 5GB, whichever is the smallest. If the box is going to be
using a lot of temporary files I will set a large /tmp partition if need be. If
it is a web server, I usually give /var/www its own partition. I have a few
applications that use /opt extensively so on those systems I give a 10GB /opt.
The rest of the space always goes to /home. It really depends on what you are
doing with the system.




thanks
 
Old 06-12-2008, 10:19 PM
"Douglas A. Tutty"
 
Default Server install questions

On Fri, Jun 06, 2008 at 01:23:49PM -0400, Tenant wrote:
> 2. What will be the partitioning scheme?
>
> Damn if I know. I'd appreciate thoughts on whether to use 32/64 bit
> versions, and are there any established partitioning schemes (I
> always uesed defaults)
>

I think that the only apps that need 32-bit are desktop ones, but I
don't know on the server side if, for example, you want to
generate/serve flash or java content, what you need. Other than this,
go with amd64.

For partitioning, part of it depends on how you want to set things up.
are you doing software raid1? Will you use LVM to allow resizing of
partitions (even migrating to different devices online)?

I use LVM over software raid1 and here's how I have it:

1. Grub can't read LVM so you need a /boot partition big enough to
hold a couple of kernels. I was generous with 32 MB for /boot. This fs
is directly on md0.

md1 is used as the physical device for LVM which is then split up.

2. Since I separate everything else out, I went with a 480 MB /, of
which I am using 182 MB. Between / and /boot, it comes to 512MB. On my
bix box this is meaningless, on my smaller old boxes its important.

3. I have a /usr of 4GB and I'm using 1.8 GB.


4. I have a /var of 4 GB and I'm using 2.1 GB.

5. On my desktop I run an i386 chroot in /srv on its own 2 GB LV.

6. I have a /home of 10 GB.

Keep things split up so that if something messes up a filesystem it
doesn't necessarily bring down the box. Be especially careful to split
up /var for your server needs. Ideally, keep the variable data you
serve on a separate filesystem from the main system. Depending on what
you use for backup, this may make life easier.

Read the LVM HOWTO (in the doc-linux-howto packages) to see how easy it
is to resize, move around, etc, the LVMs.

Read the fhs that comes with the debian policy manual package to see how
things can be split. If you will be adding third-party large packages,
you may want an LV for /opt. You may need /srv.

In any event, if you go with LVM, this doesn't have to be fixed in stone
at install time. If you want to split something off onto its own
filesystem, just create the new LV, put a filesystem on it, mount it
somewhere, copy the stuff, unmount it, change fstab, change the name of
the old directory (so you have it to test), and remount in the new spot.
Test, then remove the old renamed directory. If a filesystem is too
small, enlarge the LV, then grow the fs. All can be done on-line;
schedule a reboot to ensure everything comes up OK before you forget
what you did.

Good luck.

Doug.


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