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Old 04-05-2013, 10:44 PM
Michael
 
Default Measures against overheating / Was: static or dynamic /dev

sting wing,

although there isn't really anything left to add to Bobs reply (which is good work, as expected); but just for the fun of it, some related ideas.

If you need to monitor harddrive temperature, then possibly you've already reason to fear overheating, and you finally would need to lower the temperature generally, right.

There are settings in the BIOS as well as in the desktop settings what to do after so much idle time (or tools like 'sleepd', or you could screw some hdparm -f -Y command into the right places.) However, that does not really work since there are too many processes doing continuous small disk writes, like logs and network activities. Therefore, you should configure as much things as possible into RAM (see /etc/default/tmpfs) and even link specific folders there. As a small demonstration, some image viewers clutter your disk with large amounts of thumbnails in ~/.thumbnails, and you could make that a symbolic link to a /tmp/thumbnails folder which you create at desktop launch, via autostart script. (I invented this just now, not tested.) The thumbs will be lost, after shutdown, but usually most of them are obsolete anyway. Highly experimental would be /var/log mounted as tmpfs but why not.

However, if you've got serious overheating, then the real solution is to get the heat out of the computer. With PCs for example i tend to use external drives for the busy system partitions. In very modern laptops you would have an internal flash disk anyway, which probably don't produce much heat. But a simple thing you can do is to clean the inbuilt fan from heavy dust and you may even consider to open up some additional slots in the case, manually, or make the existing one larger (loosing warranty of course).


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Old 04-05-2013, 11:04 PM
Vladan Cvejic
 
Default Measures against overheating / Was: static or dynamic /dev

Interesting topic:

few days ago I was
playing with idle3-tools on WD that was clicking due to head parking
every 2-3 mins. In 24 hours of work I managed to gain 600 load cycles.
Interesting that Micro$oft is not making this kind of problem to HDD.
With idle3 I put idle time from 80 (8sec) to 3000 (5 min). Now - no
clicking but heating is going up to 42-43degC. Is this temperature
degrading HDD...Should I keep it cooler and how?


Also - tried to do the same thing to old PATA drive with
200k load cycles (also WD). Idle3 is obviously not working on PATA. I
have return it to living with a lot of effort.
Is there any way to reduce numbers of load cycles on PATA drives?


Bladan

On Sat, Apr 6, 2013 at 12:44 AM, Michael <codejodler@gmx.ch> wrote:



sting wing,



although there isn't really anything left to add to Bobs reply (which is good work, as expected); but just for the fun of it, some related ideas.



If you need to monitor harddrive temperature, then possibly you've already reason to fear overheating, and you finally would need to lower the temperature generally, right.



There are settings in the BIOS as well as in the desktop settings what to do after so much idle time (or tools like 'sleepd', or you could *screw some hdparm -f -Y command into the right places.) However, that does not really work since there are too many processes doing continuous small disk writes, like logs and network activities. Therefore, you should configure as much things as possible into RAM (see /etc/default/tmpfs) and even link specific folders there. As a small demonstration, some image viewers clutter your disk with large amounts of thumbnails in ~/.thumbnails, and you could make that a symbolic link to a /tmp/thumbnails folder which you create at desktop launch, via autostart script. (I invented this just now, not tested.) The thumbs will be lost, after shutdown, but usually most of them are obsolete anyway. Highly experimental would be /var/log mounted as tmpfs but why not.




However, if you've got serious overheating, then the real solution is to get the heat out of the computer. With PCs for example i tend to use external drives for the busy system partitions. In very modern laptops you would have an internal flash disk anyway, which probably don't produce much heat. But a simple thing you can do is to clean the inbuilt fan from heavy dust and you may even consider to open up some additional slots in the case, manually, or make the existing one larger (loosing warranty of course).






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Old 04-05-2013, 11:46 PM
Bob Proulx
 
Default Measures against overheating / Was: static or dynamic /dev

Vladan Cvejic wrote:
> few days ago I was playing with idle3-tools on WD that was clicking due to
> head parking every 2-3 mins. In 24 hours of work I managed to gain 600 load
> cycles.

I have that problem of continuously increasing load cycle count from
head parking with a brand new Seagate 2T drive. It isn't just WD with
this problem anymore.

> With idle3 I put idle time from 80 (8sec) to 3000 (5 min). Now - no
> clicking but heating is going up to 42-43degC. Is this temperature
> degrading HDD...Should I keep it cooler and how?

I am suspicious that head parking which increases the load cycle count
would decrease the temperature. Correlation is not causation. I am
thinking that it must be due to something different.

> Also - tried to do the same thing to old PATA drive with 200k load cycles
> (also WD). Idle3 is obviously not working on PATA. I have return it to
> living with a lot of effort.
> Is there any way to reduce numbers of load cycles on PATA drives?

On the Seagate I can use 'hdparm -B 254' (or perhaps 255) to control this:

-B Get/set Advanced Power Management feature, if the drive
supports it. A low value means aggressive power
management and a high value means better performance.
Possible settings range from values 1 through 127 (which
permit spin-down), and values 128 through 254 (which do
not permit spin-down). The highest degree of power
management is attained with a setting of 1, and the
highest I/O performance with a setting of 254. A value
of 255 tells hdparm to disable Advanced Power Management
altogether on the drive (not all drives support
disabling it, but most do).

Since for me it was only problematic on a particular type of drive and
I wanted to associate this only with that specific drive I looked at
the disk /dev/disk/by-id and associated it like this in the
hdparm.conf file. However other settings that you understand would
also be fine.

File /etc/hdparm.conf:
/dev/disk/by-id/scsi-SATA_ST2000DM001-9YN_S1E0CAP9 {
apm = 254
}

Without that the load cycle count was climbing at an average of nine
head parking load cycle count increases per hour every hour. With the
above setting in place the load cycle count stopped increasing.

Bob
 
Old 04-11-2013, 01:12 AM
Stefan Monnier
 
Default Measures against overheating / Was: static or dynamic /dev

> hdparm -f -Y command into the right places.) However, that does not really
> work since there are too many processes doing continuous small disk writes,
> like logs and network activities.

laptop-tools can configure the system to make sure that writes don't
cause drives to spin up all the time.

But admittedly, if you want your drives to spin down for longer periods
of time, you'll have to monitor your system (at least at the beginning)
to catch the various processes causing the drives to spin up and figure
out a way to prevent those occurrences.

> most of them are obsolete anyway. Highly experimental would be /var/log
> mounted as tmpfs but why not.

For /var/log a good option is to install busybox-syslogd which logs into
a circular buffer rather than a file (you can read the log with "logread").

> dust and you may even consider to open up some additional slots in the case,
> manually, or make the existing one larger (loosing warranty of course).

Note that opening additional holes may change the airflow such that some
part is not ventilated as much as it should. So it's worth thinking
a bit in order to choose where to open a new hole. In most cases the
manufacturer wasn't completely dumb and there isn't much you can do to
improve on the existing ventilation (short of opening the whole
machine, that is).


Stefan


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Old 04-11-2013, 01:17 AM
Stefan Monnier
 
Default Measures against overheating / Was: static or dynamic /dev

> few days ago I was playing with idle3-tools on WD that was clicking due to
> head parking every 2-3 mins.

If you have such a problem, remember that the problem is not so much in
the drive but in the way it is used: i.e. try and figure out why the
system needs to access the drive every 2-3 minutes.

If you can increase this time to 15 minutes, you'll not only solve this
problem, but additionally you'll save energy and reduce the heat.


Stefan


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