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Old 08-06-2008, 05:57 AM
Dave Thayer
 
Default hard drive problem

On Tue, Aug 05, 2008 at 05:53:05PM +0100, Adam Hardy wrote:
> Andrei Popescu on 05/08/08 17:22, wrote:
>
>> How old is that mobo anyway? 750 GB might be just a bit too much for it.
>
> Argh! Well, I don't really know anymore - probably 1998. So 10 years, +/-
> 2 years. But then, the other mobo was old too. Maybe just not quite as
> old. Should I be checking on a hardware compatibility list at Seagate?
>

Prior to the ATA-6 specification (released in 2000) ATA interfaces
used a 28 bit addressing mode, which limits the maximum capacity to
123 GiB (137 GB in SI units). For details see the wikipedia article
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Technology_Attachment#Drive_size_limitati ons>

There's a good chance that you will have to spring for a new controller.

dt

--
Dave Thayer | Whenever you read a good book, it's like the
Denver, Colorado USA | author is right there, in the room talking to
dave@thayer-boyle.com | you, which is why I don't like to read
| good books. - Jack Handey "Deep Thoughts"


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Old 08-07-2008, 09:25 AM
Adam Hardy
 
Default hard drive problem

Adam Hardy on 06/08/08 01:26, wrote:

Brian McKee on 06/08/08 00:30, wrote:

On Tue, Aug 5, 2008 at 7:04 PM, Adam Hardy <adam.ant@cyberspaceroad.com>
wrote:

Forsaken on 05/08/08 19:25, wrote:

On Aug 5, 2008, at 10:51 AM, Adam Hardy wrote:
I just took the hard drives from one machine and installed them into
another with a similar 500MHz CPU and mobo, but it hasn't worked out
smoothly.

fsck.ext3: no such file or directory while trying to read
/dev/hdc1 /dev/hdc1: the superblock could not be read or does not
describe a correct ext2 filesystem

/dev/hda6: clean, 11/3424256 files 151509/6839665 blocks

fsck died with exit status 8 failed (code 8)


If you type fdisk /dev/hdc1 and then press P, does it see the drive
size correctly or does it complain to you about accessing the device?

fdisk /dev/hdc1

==>

unable to open /dev/hdc1

If however I enter fdisk /dev/hda1 then it gives me a whole paragraph
about the hard drive having more than 1024 cylinders, the partition table

contains no entries, and there is a message stating


What does just fdisk -l show? Is it really at hdc ?


It shows /dev/hda and /dev/hdb (the cdrom).


Today the problem with the 750Gb drive is over - at least temporarily.

I booted up the machine and the system sees the hard drive.

In /etc/fstab yesterday, I re-assigned the drive letters to satisfy my sense of
correctness. Previously, the cdrom was /dev/hdb but I swapped that over to
/dev/hdc and made /dev/hdc1 into /dev/hdb1. However that had no impact yesterday
- it would still boot into the administrative shell (or however it is called
when the boot sequence is interrupted).


Perhaps it just needed one more boot to write something and then it was fixed.
But the old drive mapping with the cdrom on /dev/hdb had been fine for the last
year in the other machine.


So I anticipate that it will all go belly up some time soon.

Thanks for the help anyway,

regards
Adam


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Old 08-14-2008, 05:11 PM
Adam Hardy
 
Default hard drive problem

Adam Hardy on 07/08/08 10:25, wrote:

Adam Hardy on 06/08/08 01:26, wrote:

Brian McKee on 06/08/08 00:30, wrote:

On Tue, Aug 5, 2008 at 7:04 PM, Adam Hardy <adam.ant@cyberspaceroad.com>
wrote:

Forsaken on 05/08/08 19:25, wrote:

On Aug 5, 2008, at 10:51 AM, Adam Hardy wrote:
I just took the hard drives from one machine and installed them
into another with a similar 500MHz CPU and mobo, but it hasn't
worked out smoothly.

fsck.ext3: no such file or directory while trying to read
/dev/hdc1 /dev/hdc1: the superblock could not be read or does not
describe a correct ext2 filesystem

/dev/hda6: clean, 11/3424256 files 151509/6839665 blocks

fsck died with exit status 8 failed (code 8)


If you type fdisk /dev/hdc1 and then press P, does it see the drive
size correctly or does it complain to you about accessing the device?

fdisk /dev/hdc1

==>

unable to open /dev/hdc1

If however I enter fdisk /dev/hda1 then it gives me a whole
paragraph about the hard drive having more than 1024 cylinders, the
partition table

contains no entries, and there is a message stating


What does just fdisk -l show? Is it really at hdc ?


It shows /dev/hda and /dev/hdb (the cdrom).


Today the problem with the 750Gb drive is over - at least temporarily.

I booted up the machine and the system sees the hard drive.

In /etc/fstab yesterday, I re-assigned the drive letters to satisfy my
sense of correctness. Previously, the cdrom was /dev/hdb but I swapped
that over to /dev/hdc and made /dev/hdc1 into /dev/hdb1. However that
had no impact yesterday - it would still boot into the administrative
shell (or however it is called when the boot sequence is interrupted).


Perhaps it just needed one more boot to write something and then it was
fixed. But the old drive mapping with the cdrom on /dev/hdb had been
fine for the last year in the other machine.


So I anticipate that it will all go belly up some time soon.

[snip]



On Aug 7, 2008, at 5:25 AM, Adam Hardy wrote:

Today the problem with the 750Gb drive is over - at least
temporarily.


I booted up the machine and the system sees the hard drive.

In /etc/fstab yesterday, I re-assigned the drive letters to satisfy
my sense of correctness. Previously, the cdrom was /dev/hdb but I
swapped that over to /dev/hdc and made /dev/hdc1 into /dev/hdb1.
However that had no impact yesterday - it would still boot into the
administrative shell (or however it is called when the boot sequence
is interrupted).


Perhaps it just needed one more boot to write something and then it
was fixed. But the old drive mapping with the cdrom on /dev/hdb had
been fine for the last year in the other machine.


So I anticipate that it will all go belly up some time soon.

Thanks for the help anyway,


That sounds like udev screwing with you then. I've seen more than one
instance of I work on a set of drives in one machine, and it tags the
ethernet interfaces as eth0 and eth1. Then when I move the drives into
their permanent home, it tags them as eth2 and eth3, without seeing
eth0 and eth1 present in the machine anymore (and this is moving from
the exact same hardware to the exact same hardware).




For the record.


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