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Old 09-29-2012, 08:57 AM
Ivan Shmakov
 
Default kernel modules

>>>>> Eric Valette <eric.valette@free.fr> writes:

[…]

> I do not want to compile microcode tool as a module because module
> loading juts slows down the boot process and contrarilly to many
> other package requiring firmware, this one does not enable to load
> firmware when not compiled as a module.

> So it does not work for people compiling their own kernel and not
> using modules (when you tailor your kernel for a given machine,
> modules are just slowing the boot process and do not bring anything).

Unless under very specific circumstances, the use of a modular
kernel brings one the ability to replace the particular hardware
the system runs on at will.

Say, it's possible to replace a just burned motherboard with an
Intel CPU with a different one having an AMD CPU instead. Or
one may take the HDD holding the system and put it into a wholly
different box, while often retaining the ability to boot.

For these reasons, in the majority of cases, compiling a
non-modular kernel doesn't worth the effort, and may also be
harmful to the system's operation.

--
FSF associate member #7257


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Old 09-29-2012, 10:11 AM
Eric Valette
 
Default kernel modules

Unless under very specific circumstances, the use of a modular
kernel brings one the ability to replace the particular hardware
the system runs on at will.


If I do taylor my kernel for my machine, I do not care at all


Say, it's possible to replace a just burned motherboard with an
Intel CPU with a different one having an AMD CPU instead. Or
one may take the HDD holding the system and put it into a wholly
different box, while often retaining the ability to boot.


Not true in general unless you compile the whole modules set which takes
ages. You probably never rebuild the stock debian kernel on a old
machine ;-)




For these reasons, in the majority of cases, compiling a
non-modular kernel doesn't worth the effort, and may also be
harmful to the system's operation.


Well I do this happily since 96. Almost never used the debian kernel
more than a few days after install. Crashed a lot of disks, replaced
mother boards, changed computers... Nothing that booting knoppix iso
cannot fix and a lot of time gained each boot and when compiling a new
kernel version...


-- eric


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