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Old 04-19-2010, 04:02 PM
Daniel Baumann
 
Default What does .d at the end of some dirctory and filenames actually stand for?

On 04/19/2010 03:51 PM, spamfuerdavid@gmx.de wrote:

"What does .d at the end of some dirctory and filenames actually stand
for?"


it stands for 'directory'.

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Old 04-19-2010, 04:43 PM
Kevin Mark
 
Default What does .d at the end of some dirctory and filenames actually stand for?

On Mon, Apr 19, 2010 at 03:51:14PM +0200, spamfuerdavid@gmx.de wrote:
> Hi!
>
> I (and some other people) are wondering about the question:
>
> "What does .d at the end of some dirctory and filenames actually stand for?"
>
>
> It does not mean deamon or default.
>
> Does it maybe mean directory? Probably not, cause there are files named
> "x.d" too.
>
>
> There is no information about this in http://www.pathname.com/fhs/
>
>
> Greetings
> David
>From my recollection, some programs can add a way to make configurations more
flexible. Instead of making 'my-config' which may contain many configuration
stanzas, they allow their stanzas to be seperated into individual files(eg.
option-one, option-two, etc.) and these individual files are put under a main
directory (eg. my-config.d). Thus:
my-config
becomes
my-config.d/option-one
my-config.d/option-two
...

So if you want to add more info to option-one, you can simply edit that one
file and avoid editing other options.

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Old 04-19-2010, 09:20 PM
Russ Allbery
 
Default What does .d at the end of some dirctory and filenames actually stand for?

"spamfuerdavid@gmx.de" <spamfuerdavid@gmx.de> writes:

> I (and some other people) are wondering about the question:

> "What does .d at the end of some dirctory and filenames actually stand for?"

> It does not mean deamon or default.

> Does it maybe mean directory? Probably not, cause there are files named
> "x.d" too.

Once upon a time, most UNIX software was controlled by a single
configuration file per software package, and all the configuration details
for that package went into that file. This worked reasonably well when
that file was hand-crafted by the system administrator for local needs.

When distribution packaging became more and more common, it became clear
that we needed better ways of forming such configuration files out of
multiple fragments, often provided by multiple independent packages. Each
package that needs to configure some shared service should be able to
manage only its configuration without having to edit a shared
configuration file used by other packages.

The most common convention adopted was to permit including a directory
full of configuration files, where anything dropped into that directory
would become active and part of that configuration. As that convention
became more widespread, that directory was usually named after the
configuration file that it was replacing or augmenting. But since one
cannot have a directory and a file with the same name, some method was
required to distinguish, so .d was appended to the end of the
configuration file name. Hence, a configuration file /etc/Muttrc was
augmented by fragments in /etc/Muttrc.d, /etc/bash_completion was
augmented with /etc/bash_completion.d/*, and so forth. Sometimes slight
variations on that convention are used, such as /etc/xinetd.d to
supplement /etc/xinetd.conf, or /etc/apache2/conf.d to supplement
/etc/apache2/apache2.conf. But it's the same basic idea.

Generally when you see that *.d convention, it means "this is a directory
holding a bunch of configuration fragments which will be merged together
into configuration for some service."

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Old 04-19-2010, 09:41 PM
Alexander Sitnik
 
Default What does .d at the end of some dirctory and filenames actually stand for?

19.04.2010 17:42, derdavid1000@gmx.de пишет:
> "What does .d at the end of some dirctory and filenames actually stand
> for?"

This is for .directory with included files, and nothing else.
/etc/apt/sources.list.d/ extends sources.list .
You can find "include /etc/xinitd.d" in xinetd configuration and in
other packages.
This is "just another" pretty way to extend program configuration though
files packaged in .deb.


P.S.: And yet another sorry for my bad English. Thought you see lot of
that



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Old 04-20-2010, 01:28 AM
The Fungi
 
Default What does .d at the end of some dirctory and filenames actually stand for?

On Mon, Apr 19, 2010 at 02:20:52PM -0700, Russ Allbery wrote:
[...]
> The most common convention adopted was to permit including a directory
> full of configuration files, where anything dropped into that directory
> would become active and part of that configuration. As that convention
> became more widespread, that directory was usually named after the
> configuration file that it was replacing or augmenting. But since one
> cannot have a directory and a file with the same name, some method was
> required to distinguish, so .d was appended to the end of the
> configuration file name.
[...]

The earliest example of this precedent which springs to mind is
replacement of the monolothic /etc/rc boot script with an /etc/rc.d
directory.
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