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Old 06-17-2012, 02:53 AM
Dennis Jacobfeuerborn
 
Default Resizing est4 filesystem while mounted

On 06/16/2012 10:59 AM, Peter Eckel wrote:
> Hi Dennis,
>
>> The partitioning of the new disk in the guest is important because if you
>> use the disk directly as a PV then this PV will also be shown on the host.
>> An alternative is to modify the LVM filters in /etc/lvm/lvm.conf on the
>> host to specifically not scan the LV for the new disk.
>> I find it easier to create a partition though (i.e. use /dev/vda1 instead
>> of /dev/vda as the PV).
>
> Thanks for your explanation. Until now I just filteres the guests' PVs on the host on the "human interface level" by simply ignoring them, but yours is definitely the cleaner and more secure way.
>
> Maybe I missed something, but in what way is it easier to partition each and every LV one wants to use as a PV in a guest than to specify a proper filter in /etc/lvm/lvm.conf once?
>
> I use a consistent naming scheme for the lv's like
>
> /dev/vg_<number>/lv_virt_<hostname>
>
> and use the filter
>
> filter = [ "r|/dev/vg_d+/lv_virt_.*|" ]
>
> to ignore all the guest's PVs. Is there any downside in doing that, or are there any advantages in using partitions instead of raw 'devices' for the PVs?

I don't think there are any meaningful advantages or disadvantages to
either approach. The partition approach allows you to copy and use the
disks on any system regardless of the filter configuration because LVM can
never see the metadata directly but even then if you forget the filter this
just makes things look a bit untidy until the filter is in place.

Hopefully the new virtio-scsi driver will allow the on-the-fly resizing of
virtual disks and make the live extension of diskspace in virtual machines
less cumbersome.

Regards,
Dennis
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Old 06-18-2012, 08:09 PM
"Jeff Boyce"
 
Default Resizing est4 filesystem while mounted

Replying to the daily digest, with my response at the bottom.



>Message: 13
>Date: Fri, 15 Jun 2012 12:22:08 -0700
>From: Ray Van Dolson <rayvd@bludgeon.org>
>Subject: Re: [CentOS] Resizing est4 filesystem while mounted
>To: centos@centos.org
>Message-ID: <20120615192207.GA23689@bludgeon.org>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>On Fri, Jun 15, 2012 at 12:10:09PM -0700, Jeff Boyce wrote:
>> Greetings -
>>
>> I had a logical volume that was running out of space on a virtual
>> machine.
>> I successfully expanded the LV using lvextend, and lvdisplay shows that
>> it
>> has been expanded. Then I went to expand the filesystem to fill the new
>> space (# resize2fs -p /dev/vde1) and I get the results that the
>> filesystem
>> is already xx blocks long, nothing to do. If I do a # df -h, I can see
>> that
>> the filesystem has not been extended. I could kick the users off the VM,
>> reboot the VM using a GParted live CD and extend the filesystem that way,
>> but I thought that it was possible to do this live and mounted? The RH
>> docs
>> say this is possible; the man page for resize2fs also says it is possible
>> with ext4. What am I missing here? This is a Centos 6.2 VM with an ext4
>> filesystem. The logical volumes are setup on the host system which is
>> also
>> a Centos 6.2 system.
>
>Try resize4fs (assuming your FS is ext4).
>
>Ray

Well, I have never seen a reference to resize4fs before (and yes my FS is
ext4). It is not on my Centos 6.2 system, and doing a little searching
through repositories for that specifically, or e4fsprogs, and I can't find
it anywhere to even try it. Any google reference seems to point back to
resize2fs. I ended up booting a live SystemRescueCD and using GParted via
the GUI. My notes indicate that is what I had done previously also. I am
still stumped, everything that I have read indicates that resize2fs can do a
live resizing on ext4 file systems. Can anybody confirm or deny this? Is
the reason I can't do this because it is on an LVM logical volume? Thanks.

Jeff Boyce
Meridian Environmental

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Old 06-18-2012, 08:22 PM
Ray Van Dolson
 
Default Resizing est4 filesystem while mounted

On Mon, Jun 18, 2012 at 01:09:01PM -0700, Jeff Boyce wrote:
> >On Fri, Jun 15, 2012 at 12:10:09PM -0700, Jeff Boyce wrote:
> >>Greetings -
> >>
> >>I had a logical volume that was running out of space on a
> >>virtual machine.
> >>I successfully expanded the LV using lvextend, and lvdisplay
> >>shows that it
> >>has been expanded. Then I went to expand the filesystem to fill the new
> >>space (# resize2fs -p /dev/vde1) and I get the results that the
> >>filesystem
> >>is already xx blocks long, nothing to do. If I do a # df -h, I
> >>can see that
> >>the filesystem has not been extended. I could kick the users off the VM,
> >>reboot the VM using a GParted live CD and extend the filesystem that way,
> >>but I thought that it was possible to do this live and mounted?
> >>The RH docs
> >>say this is possible; the man page for resize2fs also says it is possible
> >>with ext4. What am I missing here? This is a Centos 6.2 VM with an ext4
> >>filesystem. The logical volumes are setup on the host system
> >>which is also
> >>a Centos 6.2 system.
> >
> >Try resize4fs (assuming your FS is ext4).
> >
> >Ray
>
> Well, I have never seen a reference to resize4fs before (and yes my
> FS is ext4). It is not on my Centos 6.2 system, and doing a little
> searching through repositories for that specifically, or e4fsprogs,
> and I can't find it anywhere to even try it. Any google reference
> seems to point back to resize2fs. I ended up booting a live
> SystemRescueCD and using GParted via the GUI. My notes indicate
> that is what I had done previously also. I am still stumped,
> everything that I have read indicates that resize2fs can do a live
> resizing on ext4 file systems. Can anybody confirm or deny this?
> Is the reason I can't do this because it is on an LVM logical
> volume? Thanks.
>
> Jeff Boyce
> Meridian Environmental
>

Interesting. Maybe this is a difference between a 6.x and 5.x system.
On my RHEL 5.8 system:

# rpm -qf /sbin/resize4fs
e4fsprogs-1.41.12-2.el5

I see now from my Satellite server that this package dose not exist for
6.x.

It's not clear to me why you ran into the issue you did. Will keep an
eye out for this here.

Ray
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Old 06-18-2012, 08:28 PM
Dennis Jacobfeuerborn
 
Default Resizing est4 filesystem while mounted

On 06/18/2012 10:09 PM, Jeff Boyce wrote:
> Replying to the daily digest, with my response at the bottom.
>
>
>
>> Message: 13
>> Date: Fri, 15 Jun 2012 12:22:08 -0700
>> From: Ray Van Dolson <rayvd@bludgeon.org>
>> Subject: Re: [CentOS] Resizing est4 filesystem while mounted
>> To: centos@centos.org
>> Message-ID: <20120615192207.GA23689@bludgeon.org>
>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>>
>> On Fri, Jun 15, 2012 at 12:10:09PM -0700, Jeff Boyce wrote:
>>> Greetings -
>>>
>>> I had a logical volume that was running out of space on a virtual
>>> machine.
>>> I successfully expanded the LV using lvextend, and lvdisplay shows that
>>> it
>>> has been expanded. Then I went to expand the filesystem to fill the new
>>> space (# resize2fs -p /dev/vde1) and I get the results that the
>>> filesystem
>>> is already xx blocks long, nothing to do. If I do a # df -h, I can see
>>> that
>>> the filesystem has not been extended. I could kick the users off the VM,
>>> reboot the VM using a GParted live CD and extend the filesystem that way,
>>> but I thought that it was possible to do this live and mounted? The RH
>>> docs
>>> say this is possible; the man page for resize2fs also says it is possible
>>> with ext4. What am I missing here? This is a Centos 6.2 VM with an ext4
>>> filesystem. The logical volumes are setup on the host system which is
>>> also
>>> a Centos 6.2 system.
>>
>> Try resize4fs (assuming your FS is ext4).
>>
>> Ray
>
> Well, I have never seen a reference to resize4fs before (and yes my FS is
> ext4). It is not on my Centos 6.2 system, and doing a little searching
> through repositories for that specifically, or e4fsprogs, and I can't find
> it anywhere to even try it. Any google reference seems to point back to
> resize2fs. I ended up booting a live SystemRescueCD and using GParted via
> the GUI. My notes indicate that is what I had done previously also. I am
> still stumped, everything that I have read indicates that resize2fs can do a
> live resizing on ext4 file systems. Can anybody confirm or deny this? Is
> the reason I can't do this because it is on an LVM logical volume? Thanks.

Please post some details about your storage topology. Without this
information its not really possible to be sure what is going on.
resizefs cannot work as long as the underlying layers don't see any change
in size and you didn't seem to look for that.

Regards,
Dennis
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Old 06-19-2012, 04:25 AM
Robert Nichols
 
Default Resizing est4 filesystem while mounted

On 06/18/2012 03:09 PM, Jeff Boyce wrote:
> Well, I have never seen a reference to resize4fs before (and yes my FS is
> ext4). It is not on my Centos 6.2 system, and doing a little searching
> through repositories for that specifically, or e4fsprogs, and I can't find
> it anywhere to even try it. Any google reference seems to point back to
> resize2fs. I ended up booting a live SystemRescueCD and using GParted via
> the GUI. My notes indicate that is what I had done previously also. I am
> still stumped, everything that I have read indicates that resize2fs can do a
> live resizing on ext4 file systems. Can anybody confirm or deny this?

In CentOS 5.x ext4 was experimental, and there was a separate "e4fsprogs"
package containing the tools for working with it. As of version 6.0,
ext4 is considered mainstream, and the tools have been merged back under
the ext2 umbrella, just as with ext3.

--
Bob Nichols "NOSPAM" is really part of my email address.
Do NOT delete it.

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Old 06-19-2012, 05:24 PM
"Jeff Boyce"
 
Default Resizing est4 filesystem while mounted

Replying to the daily digest, with my response at the bottom.


> Message: 18
> Date: Mon, 18 Jun 2012 22:28:31 +0200
> From: Dennis Jacobfeuerborn <dennisml@conversis.de>
> Subject: Re: [CentOS] Resizing est4 filesystem while mounted
> To: centos@centos.org
> Message-ID: <4FDF8F6F.8030300@conversis.de>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> On 06/18/2012 10:09 PM, Jeff Boyce wrote:
>> Replying to the daily digest, with my response at the bottom.
>>
>>
>>
>>> Message: 13
>>> Date: Fri, 15 Jun 2012 12:22:08 -0700
>>> From: Ray Van Dolson <rayvd@bludgeon.org>
>>> Subject: Re: [CentOS] Resizing est4 filesystem while mounted
>>> To: centos@centos.org
>>> Message-ID: <20120615192207.GA23689@bludgeon.org>
>>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>>>
>>> On Fri, Jun 15, 2012 at 12:10:09PM -0700, Jeff Boyce wrote:
>>>> Greetings -
>>>>
>>>> I had a logical volume that was running out of space on a virtual
>>>> machine.
>>>> I successfully expanded the LV using lvextend, and lvdisplay shows that
>>>> it
>>>> has been expanded. Then I went to expand the filesystem to fill the new
>>>> space (# resize2fs -p /dev/vde1) and I get the results that the
>>>> filesystem
>>>> is already xx blocks long, nothing to do. If I do a # df -h, I can see
>>>> that
>>>> the filesystem has not been extended. I could kick the users off the
>>>> VM,
>>>> reboot the VM using a GParted live CD and extend the filesystem that
>>>> way,
>>>> but I thought that it was possible to do this live and mounted? The RH
>>>> docs
>>>> say this is possible; the man page for resize2fs also says it is
>>>> possible
>>>> with ext4. What am I missing here? This is a Centos 6.2 VM with an ext4
>>>> filesystem. The logical volumes are setup on the host system which is
>>>> also
>>>> a Centos 6.2 system.
>>>
>>> Try resize4fs (assuming your FS is ext4).
>>>
>>> Ray
>>
>> Well, I have never seen a reference to resize4fs before (and yes my FS is
>> ext4). It is not on my Centos 6.2 system, and doing a little searching
>> through repositories for that specifically, or e4fsprogs, and I can't
>> find
>> it anywhere to even try it. Any google reference seems to point back to
>> resize2fs. I ended up booting a live SystemRescueCD and using GParted
>> via
>> the GUI. My notes indicate that is what I had done previously also. I
>> am
>> still stumped, everything that I have read indicates that resize2fs can
>> do a
>> live resizing on ext4 file systems. Can anybody confirm or deny this?
>> Is
>> the reason I can't do this because it is on an LVM logical volume?
>> Thanks.
>
> Please post some details about your storage topology. Without this
> information its not really possible to be sure what is going on.
> resizefs cannot work as long as the underlying layers don't see any change
> in size and you didn't seem to look for that.
>
> Regards,
> Dennis


I provided some of that information in my original post, but if you can help
explain why I couldn't seem to resize the file system while mounted here is
more information.

Host system is Centos 6.2 on a Dell PE T610 with hardware raid on a PERC
H700. Raid 5 is setup across three disks with a fourth hot spare. I have
created a volume group within the raid 5 encompassing most of my drive
space. Within the VG I have created numerous logical volumes that are
assigned to specific systems.

Volume Group: vg_mei
Logical Volumes:
lv_earthroot
lv_earthswap
lv_earthvar
lv_sequoiaroot
lv_sequoiaswap
lv_sequoiavar
lv_sequoiahome
lv_sequoiaecosystem

Earth is my host system and Sequoia is one of the guest systems.
lv_sequoiaecosystem is the space dedicated to our Samba server and is the LV
that I was expanding to make more space available to the rest of the staff.
I had successfully extended lv_sequoiaecosystem using the following command
from root on earth (lvextend -L+50G /dev/vg_mei/lv_sequoiaecosystem).
Issuing the command (lvdisplay /dev/vg_mei/lv_sequoiaecosystem) following
this showed that the LV was successfully extended from 100 to 150 GB.

I then logged onto sequoia as root and issued a df -h to determine which
device needed the file system to be resized (/dev/vde1). The output below
is current, after I resized the filesystem using GParted.

[root@sequoia ~]# df -h
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/vda2 4.5G 2.5G 1.8G 59% /
tmpfs 1004M 112K 1004M 1% /dev/shm
/dev/vda1 485M 55M 406M 12% /boot
/dev/vde1 148G 85G 56G 61% /ecosystem
/dev/vdd1 20G 1.3G 18G 7% /home
/dev/vdc1 2.0G 266M 1.7G 14% /var

Then from root on sequoia I issued the command (resize2fs -p /dev/vde1) and
got back the result that the filesystem is already 26214144 blocks long,
nothing to do. That is when I posted my first question about not being able
to resize a live mounted filesystem. Is that enough information for your
question, or is there something that I am not providing? Thanks.

Jeff

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Old 06-23-2012, 11:37 AM
Markus Falb
 
Default Resizing est4 filesystem while mounted

On 19.6.2012 06:25, Robert Nichols wrote:
> On 06/18/2012 03:09 PM, Jeff Boyce wrote:
>> Well, I have never seen a reference to resize4fs before (and yes my FS is
>> ext4). It is not on my Centos 6.2 system, and doing a little searching
>> through repositories for that specifically, or e4fsprogs, and I can't find
>> it anywhere to even try it. Any google reference seems to point back to
>> resize2fs. I ended up booting a live SystemRescueCD and using GParted via
>> the GUI. My notes indicate that is what I had done previously also. I am
>> still stumped, everything that I have read indicates that resize2fs can do a
>> live resizing on ext4 file systems. Can anybody confirm or deny this?
>
> In CentOS 5.x ext4 was experimental, and there was a separate "e4fsprogs"

ext4 *is* fully supported since 5.6, but the separate e4fsprogs stayed.
--
Kind Regards, Markus Falb

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