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Old 11-04-2011, 12:32 PM
 
Default CentOS 6 updating policy

David McGiven wrote:
> I am migrating from debian to RHEL (CentOS) and I am wondering how the
> CentOS 6 updating system works.

Welcome, then.
>
> Suppose I install CentOS 6.1 now. Suppose in 8 months CentOS 6.2 is
> released.
>
> Now I issue a yum update, so my system will be updated to CentOS 6.2, or I
> will have an updated 6.1 ?

6.2 Yum does subreleases without a hitch (mostly).
<snip>
mark


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Old 11-04-2011, 12:48 PM
John Hinton
 
Default CentOS 6 updating policy

On 11/4/2011 9:24 AM, David McGiven wrote:
> I am migrating from debian to RHEL (CentOS) and I am wondering how the
> CentOS 6 updating system works.
>
>
> Suppose I install CentOS 6.1 now. Suppose in 8 months CentOS 6.2 is
> released.
yum update will pull in the new version and install it and update your
release from 6.1 to 6.2. (if there were a 6.1... it might get skipped
and 6.0 will update to 6.2)
>
>
> Now I issue a yum update, so my system will be updated to CentOS 6.2, or I
> will have an updated 6.1 ?
It will be 6.2
>
>
> What if I have been issuing yum update very day just to be sure there are
> no packages with urgent security bugs ? I am having a very updated 6.1 or
> an almost 6.2 ? Or are they the same thing ? I think that during this time
> I should be using Continous Release repository, right ?
Yes, CR is optional but to me important.
>
>
> Also, which is the policy regarding new versions of software, kernel and
> libs ? The bugfixes will be backported or there will be major differences
> between, let’s say, 6.1 and 6.4 ?
Security issues are almost always backported. Almost always on a CentOS
major release, anything installed such as website scripts will work
throughout the entire 7 year cycle of minor releases. This is the main
beauty of CentOS, and also the main drawback. Sometimes clients want
something newer... for instance PHP 5.3. It was not available via
upstream until the release of 6 and the last minor release of 5
(although that was to me a sad attempt). So, there will be some gripes
at times, but since you haven't broken their stuff during the major
release cycle... what is better? And, you can always customize a system,
but often times reliability will suffer somewhere along the line.
>
>
> I couldn’t find all of these question properly answered in the FAQs
Basically it is just really easy and happens during yum update. Minor
releases are times when the largest changes are made, but again, rarely
do they actually break anything. I think I still have enough fingers on
my hands to count the issues over the last 15 or so years when something
client side broke in a server environment.

Non-upstream repositories... not so much. But in fairness, some of these
repositories provide packages that make core changes, like an entirely
new conf file and one must go fix these. Upstream seems to operate under
never forcing a replacement conf file... In other words, the service
will generally continue to operate without admin intervention.

John Hinton
>
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
>
> Regards,
>
> David
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos


--
John Hinton
877-777-1407 ext 502
http://www.ew3d.com
Comprehensive Online Solutions

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Old 11-04-2011, 12:57 PM
Ljubomir Ljubojevic
 
Default CentOS 6 updating policy

Vreme: 11/04/2011 02:24 PM, David McGiven piše:
> I am migrating from debian to RHEL (CentOS) and I am wondering how the
> CentOS 6 updating system works.

Welcome.

In first part I will explain normal process, without CR repository
(which changes things).

>
>
> Suppose I install CentOS 6.1 now. Suppose in 8 months CentOS 6.2 is
> released.
>

Yum update is continuous process. So far (or at present) only way is
that you will be upgraded to latest minor point-release (.1, .2,...).

>
> Now I issue a yum update, so my system will be updated to CentOS 6.2, or I
> will have an updated 6.1 ?
>

In your example, you would have 6.2 when yum update is finished.
Sometimes "yum upgrade" is recommended, but only if you are advised in
Release Notes for given point release.

>
> What if I have been issuing yum update very day just to be sure there are
> no packages with urgent security bugs ? I am having a very updated 6.1 or
> an almost 6.2 ? Or are they the same thing ? I think that during this time
> I should be using Continous Release repository, right ?
>

There are normal updates against every point release, like updates
against 6.0 until 6.1 is released, then updates until 6.2, etc. So just
"very updated 6.1" in your example.

Point releases are mostly used to bring new kernel/hardware support
(drivers), new versions of core packages (rarely), or new technologies.
Updates between point releases will only (in most cases) contain bugfixes.

>
> Also, which is the policy regarding new versions of software, kernel and
> libs ? The bugfixes will be backported or there will be major differences
> between, let’s say, 6.1 and 6.4 ?
>

Upstream changes (mostly) versions of packages only if there is
compelling reason to do so. Whole point is to have unchanged system that
will behave the same as previous point releases. Of course, there are
deviations from this policy, but as small and as rare as possible.

So short answer is backported bugfixes (even in kernel) and as small
changes as possible, unless gains are overwhelming and do not brake
anything.

--

Ljubomir Ljubojevic
(Love is in the Air)
PL Computers
Serbia, Europe

Google is the Mother, Google is the Father, and traceroute is your
trusty Spiderman...
StarOS, Mikrotik and CentOS/RHEL/Linux consultant
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Old 11-04-2011, 01:08 PM
Ljubomir Ljubojevic
 
Default CentOS 6 updating policy

> Vreme: 11/04/2011 02:24 PM, David McGiven piše:
>> I should be using Continous Release repository, right ?

I forgot CR explanation. CR repository is means to update gradually to
next point release because building upstream's (RH) packages with binary
compatibility became very difficult. So to avoid holding back numerous
"easy to build" packages that enhance and stabilize system, not to
mention security fixes, CentOS dev's adopted CR repository.

Note that RHEL does not have CR repo, it is specific to it's clones
(CentOS, SL).

There is discussion in process, to create dual options,
1. with CR repo enabled by default, and
2. Separate frozen poin releases (6.0 with all updates UNTIL 6.1 was
released, etc.)


--

Ljubomir Ljubojevic
(Love is in the Air)
PL Computers
Serbia, Europe

Google is the Mother, Google is the Father, and traceroute is your
trusty Spiderman...
StarOS, Mikrotik and CentOS/RHEL/Linux consultant
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Old 11-04-2011, 01:26 PM
Marko Vojinovic
 
Default CentOS 6 updating policy

On Friday 04 November 2011 13:24:32 David McGiven wrote:
> I am migrating from debian to RHEL (CentOS) and I am wondering how the
> CentOS 6 updating system works.
>
> Suppose I install CentOS 6.1 now. Suppose in 8 months CentOS 6.2 is
> released.
>
> Now I issue a yum update, so my system will be updated to CentOS 6.2, or I
> will have an updated 6.1 ?

It would be updated to 6.2.

> What if I have been issuing yum update very day just to be sure there are
> no packages with urgent security bugs ? I am having a very updated 6.1 or
> an almost 6.2 ? Or are they the same thing?

AFAIK, they would be the same thing. I wouldn't know of any major difference
between a "very updated 6.1" and "almost 6.2".

But I may be wrong here, I'm not a CentOS developer. :-)

> I think that during this time
> I should be using Continous Release repository, right ?

This is more complicated. The story above would be the "usual" way of working,
and it indeed is for CentOS 4 and 5. They do not have the CR repository.

However, for CentOS 6 there is an additional quirk --- once the upstream (that
is, Red Hat) releases a new point release (say, 6.1), it naturally stops
providing updates for the previos point release (say, 6.0), expects everyone
to just update to 6.1 and receive updates to that from now on.

The problem is that for version 6 CentOS devs have a hard time finishing the
CentOS rebuild of the new release (6.1), so the CentOS 6 users stay on 6.0,
and stop receiving any updates for it, because upstream doesn't provide any
anymore. The CR repo is used for those situations --- it provides updates to
CentOS 6.0 which were supposed to be updates for CentOS 6.1, if CentOS 6.1 had
existed at the time of issuing the update.

The bottom line is --- if you use the CR repo, you'll have an up-to-date
CentOS 6 system as possible, regardless of the minor version number still
being 0. This is *less* updated than the upstream's 6.1 system, because of the
mentioned problems with rebuilding certain packages. If you believe these
missing updates are so very crucial for your system, go buy Red hat and you'll
be provided with those. Otherwise, use the CR repo and wait for the CentOS
devs to finish building them.

Eventually, when the 6.1 build of CentOS becomes complete, version numbers
will be back in sync with what is actually installed on your system (via an
ordinary yum update), and your syste will be an up-to-date 6.1, regardless of
whether or not you have used the CR repo in the meantime. The CR repository
will become empty at that time.

So, yes, you probably want to use the CR repository until 6.1 is finished.
Maybe there will be a lag for 6.2 release as well, and then there will be the
CR repo again for the same reasons.

> Also, which is the policy regarding new versions of software, kernel and
> libs ? The bugfixes will be backported or there will be major differences
> between, let’s say, 6.1 and 6.4 ?

AFAIK, most of the software is kept on the single version, but there might be
some exceptions. For example the kernel version will be fixed throughout the
6.x releases, and all bugfixes and the rest will be backported.

I don't know exactly about the exceptions, but I think I remember that firefox
version may be bumped within 6.x releases, or something like that...

> I couldn’t find all of these question properly answered in the FAQs

CentOS follows exactly the release strategy of upstream. You probably want to
look up the FAQ of RedHat. :-)

HTH, :-)
Marko

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Old 11-04-2011, 03:57 PM
John R Pierce
 
Default CentOS 6 updating policy

On 11/04/11 7:26 AM, Marko Vojinovic wrote:
>> What if I have been issuing yum update very day just to be sure there are
>> > no packages with urgent security bugs ? I am having a very updated 6.1 or
>> > an almost 6.2 ? Or are they the same thing?
> AFAIK, they would be the same thing. I wouldn't know of any major difference
> between a "very updated 6.1" and "almost 6.2".

when you run `yum update` just before 6.2 is released, you'll have a
very updated 6.1. when you run it after 6.2 is released, you'll have a
6.2 plus any patches released since 6.2 was rolled up.

the 'numbered' releases just represent roll ups of patches that are
bundled onto a new set of installation media. 6.1, 6.2, etc represent
a snapshot.


--
john r pierce N 37, W 122
santa cruz ca mid-left coast

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Old 11-04-2011, 04:01 PM
Rajagopal Swaminathan
 
Default CentOS 6 updating policy

Greetings,

On Fri, Nov 4, 2011 at 10:27 PM, John R Pierce <pierce@hogranch.com> wrote:
> On 11/04/11 7:26 AM, Marko Vojinovic wrote:
>
> the 'numbered' releases just represent roll ups of patches that are
> bundled onto a new set of installation media. * 6.1, 6.2, etc represent
> a snapshot.

If you are from M$ world, treat them as "Service Packs"


--
Regards,

Rajagopal
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