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Old 10-10-2011, 06:08 AM
hadi motamedi
 
Default trace?

Dear All
I have installed an announcement application on my centos 6.0 server
that calls for putting specific voice announcement files under
/usr/local/srf/bin/prompt to be played in response to certain
conditions occurred . There are a huge number of files in the
announcement directory and it seems that just one of these voice files
is corrupt . Can you please let me know how can I trace in real time
to see which application is going to use this folder and which of
these files will be accessed at the moment ? My goal is to find that
corrupted voice file in real time .
Thank you
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
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http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 10-10-2011, 06:42 AM
Eero Volotinen
 
Default trace?

2011/10/10 hadi motamedi <motamedi24@gmail.com>:
> Dear All
> I have installed an announcement application on my centos 6.0 server
> that calls for putting specific voice announcement files under
> /usr/local/srf/bin/prompt to be played in response to certain
> conditions occurred . There are a huge number of files in the
> announcement directory and it seems that just one of these voice files
> is corrupt . Can you please let me know how can I trace in real time
> to see which application is going to use this folder and which of
> these files will be accessed at the moment ? My goal is to find that
> corrupted voice file in real time .
> Thank you
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>

How about something like this:


watch -n 1 lsof /path/to/files

--
Eero
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 10-10-2011, 10:33 AM
John Doe
 
Default trace?

From: Eero Volotinen <eero.volotinen@iki.fi>

> 2011/10/10 hadi motamedi <motamedi24@gmail.com>:
>> I have installed an announcement application on my centos 6.0 server
>> that calls for putting specific voice announcement files under
>> /usr/local/srf/bin/prompt to be played in response to certain
>> conditions occurred . There are a huge number of files in the
>> announcement directory and it seems that just one of these voice files
>> is corrupt . Can you please let me know how can I trace in real time
>> to see which application is going to use this folder and which of
>> these files will be accessed at the moment ? My goal is to find that
>> corrupted voice file in real time .
>
> How about something like this:
> watch -n 1 lsof /path/to/files

Or maybe:
* inotifywait -m -e access --format "%T %f" --timefmt "%D %T" -r /path/to/files

JD
_______________________________________________
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http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 10-11-2011, 06:07 AM
hadi motamedi
 
Default trace?

On 10/10/11, John Doe <jdmls@yahoo.com> wrote:
> From: Eero Volotinen <eero.volotinen@iki.fi>
>
>> 2011/10/10 hadi motamedi <motamedi24@gmail.com>:
>>> I have installed an announcement application on my centos 6.0 server
>>> that calls for putting specific voice announcement files under
>>> /usr/local/srf/bin/prompt to be played in response to certain
>>> conditions occurred . There are a huge number of files in the
>>> announcement directory and it seems that just one of these voice files
>>> is corrupt . Can you please let me know how can I trace in real time
>>> to see which application is going to use this folder and which of
>>> these files will be accessed at the moment ? My goal is to find that
>>> corrupted voice file in real time .
>>
>> How about something like this:
>> watch -n 1 lsof /path/to/files
>
> Or maybe:
> inotifywait -m -e access --format "%T %f" --timefmt "%D %T" -r
> /path/to/files
>
> JD
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
Excuse me, the announcement application program is accessing this
folder from time to time to play the appropriate voice announcement
file . As there are a huge number of voice files inside this folder,
so I need some way to trace to see which file is being accessed when
hearing the corrupted voice file . I tried for your "watch" &
"inotifywait" utilities but I didn't see any log even when
intentionally trying to ftp some files into this folder. It seems that
my previous explanation of the problem was not so clear. Sorry again .
What can I do to find an appropriate trace method for my case in your
opinion ?
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 10-11-2011, 10:41 AM
Ljubomir Ljubojevic
 
Default trace?

Vreme: 10/11/2011 08:07 AM, hadi motamedi piše:
> On 10/10/11, John Doe<jdmls@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> From: Eero Volotinen<eero.volotinen@iki.fi>
>>
>>> 2011/10/10 hadi motamedi<motamedi24@gmail.com>:
>>>> I have installed an announcement application on my centos 6.0 server
>>>> that calls for putting specific voice announcement files under
>>>> /usr/local/srf/bin/prompt to be played in response to certain
>>>> conditions occurred . There are a huge number of files in the
>>>> announcement directory and it seems that just one of these voice files
>>>> is corrupt . Can you please let me know how can I trace in real time
>>>> to see which application is going to use this folder and which of
>>>> these files will be accessed at the moment ? My goal is to find that
>>>> corrupted voice file in real time .
>>>
>>> How about something like this:
>>> watch -n 1 lsof /path/to/files
>>
>> Or maybe:
>> inotifywait -m -e access --format "%T %f" --timefmt "%D %T" -r
>> /path/to/files
>>
>> JD
>> _______________________________________________
>> CentOS mailing list
>> CentOS@centos.org
>> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>>
> Excuse me, the announcement application program is accessing this
> folder from time to time to play the appropriate voice announcement
> file . As there are a huge number of voice files inside this folder,
> so I need some way to trace to see which file is being accessed when
> hearing the corrupted voice file . I tried for your "watch"&
> "inotifywait" utilities but I didn't see any log even when
> intentionally trying to ftp some files into this folder. It seems that
> my previous explanation of the problem was not so clear. Sorry again .
> What can I do to find an appropriate trace method for my case in your
> opinion ?

Maybe this can help:
http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/howto-linux-get-list-of-open-files/

Basically, monitor that application to see what files it opens. Maybe
grep to filter only files from specific directory.

--

Ljubomir Ljubojevic
(Love is in the Air)
PL Computers
Serbia, Europe

Google is the Mother, Google is the Father, and traceroute is your
trusty Spiderman...
StarOS, Mikrotik and CentOS/RHEL/Linux consultant
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 10-11-2011, 10:59 AM
John Doe
 
Default trace?

From: hadi motamedi <motamedi24@gmail.com>

> On 10/10/11, John Doe <jdmls@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> From: Eero Volotinen <eero.volotinen@iki.fi>
>>> 2011/10/10 hadi motamedi <motamedi24@gmail.com>:
>>>> * I have installed an announcement application on my centos 6.0
> server
>>>> * that calls for putting specific voice announcement files under
>>>> * /usr/local/srf/bin/prompt to be played in response to certain
>>>> * conditions occurred . There are a huge number of files in the
>>>> * announcement directory and it seems that just one of these voice
> files
>>>> * is corrupt . Can you please let me know how can I trace in real
> time
>>>> * to see which application is going to use this folder and which of
>>>> * these files will be accessed at the moment ? My goal is to find
> that
>>>> * corrupted voice file in real time .
>>>
>>> How about something like this:
>>> watch -n 1 lsof /path/to/files
>>
>> Or maybe:
>> * inotifywait -m -e access --format "%T %f" --timefmt "%D
> %T" -r
>> /path/to/files
> Excuse me, the announcement application program is accessing this
> folder from time to time to play the appropriate voice announcement
> file . As there are a huge number of voice files inside this folder,
> so I need some way to trace to see which file is being accessed when
> hearing the corrupted voice file . I tried for your "watch" &
> "inotifywait" utilities but I didn't see any log even when
> intentionally trying to ftp some files into this folder. It seems that
> my previous explanation of the problem was not so clear. Sorry again .
> What can I do to find an appropriate trace method for my case in your
> opinion ?

Your previous explanation of the problem was very clear...
Here is an example when I do:
# inotifywait -m -e access --format "%T %f" --timefmt "%D %T" -r /home/jd/tmp
Setting up watches.* Beware: since -r was given, this may take a while!
Watches established.
$ less toto.php
...
10/10/11 12:33:21 toto.php
It detected my read access to the file 'toto.php' in '/home/jd/tmp'

JD
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 10-11-2011, 11:25 AM
hadi motamedi
 
Default trace?

On 10/11/11, Ljubomir Ljubojevic <office@plnet.rs> wrote:
> Vreme: 10/11/2011 08:07 AM, hadi motamedi piše:
>> On 10/10/11, John Doe<jdmls@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>> From: Eero Volotinen<eero.volotinen@iki.fi>
>>>
>>>> 2011/10/10 hadi motamedi<motamedi24@gmail.com>:
>>>>> I have installed an announcement application on my centos 6.0 server
>>>>> that calls for putting specific voice announcement files under
>>>>> /usr/local/srf/bin/prompt to be played in response to certain
>>>>> conditions occurred . There are a huge number of files in the
>>>>> announcement directory and it seems that just one of these voice
>>>>> files
>>>>> is corrupt . Can you please let me know how can I trace in real time
>>>>> to see which application is going to use this folder and which of
>>>>> these files will be accessed at the moment ? My goal is to find that
>>>>> corrupted voice file in real time .
>>>>
>>>> How about something like this:
>>>> watch -n 1 lsof /path/to/files
>>>
>>> Or maybe:
>>> inotifywait -m -e access --format "%T %f" --timefmt "%D %T" -r
>>> /path/to/files
>>>
>>> JD
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> CentOS mailing list
>>> CentOS@centos.org
>>> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>>>
>> Excuse me, the announcement application program is accessing this
>> folder from time to time to play the appropriate voice announcement
>> file . As there are a huge number of voice files inside this folder,
>> so I need some way to trace to see which file is being accessed when
>> hearing the corrupted voice file . I tried for your "watch"&
>> "inotifywait" utilities but I didn't see any log even when
>> intentionally trying to ftp some files into this folder. It seems that
>> my previous explanation of the problem was not so clear. Sorry again .
>> What can I do to find an appropriate trace method for my case in your
>> opinion ?
>
> Maybe this can help:
> http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/howto-linux-get-list-of-open-files/
>
> Basically, monitor that application to see what files it opens. Maybe
> grep to filter only files from specific directory.
>
> --
>
> Ljubomir Ljubojevic
> (Love is in the Air)
> PL Computers
> Serbia, Europe
>
> Google is the Mother, Google is the Father, and traceroute is your
> trusty Spiderman...
> StarOS, Mikrotik and CentOS/RHEL/Linux consultant
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
Thank you very much for your help. At now, it seems that I have all of
the tools to deal with my problem.
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 10-11-2011, 11:53 AM
hadi motamedi
 
Default trace?

On 10/11/11, John Doe <jdmls@yahoo.com> wrote:
> From: hadi motamedi <motamedi24@gmail.com>
>
>> On 10/10/11, John Doe <jdmls@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>> From: Eero Volotinen <eero.volotinen@iki.fi>
>>>> 2011/10/10 hadi motamedi <motamedi24@gmail.com>:
>>>>> I have installed an announcement application on my centos 6.0
>> server
>>>>> that calls for putting specific voice announcement files under
>>>>> /usr/local/srf/bin/prompt to be played in response to certain
>>>>> conditions occurred . There are a huge number of files in the
>>>>> announcement directory and it seems that just one of these voice
>> files
>>>>> is corrupt . Can you please let me know how can I trace in real
>> time
>>>>> to see which application is going to use this folder and which of
>>>>> these files will be accessed at the moment ? My goal is to find
>> that
>>>>> corrupted voice file in real time .
>>>>
>>>> How about something like this:
>>>> watch -n 1 lsof /path/to/files
>>>
>>> Or maybe:
>>> inotifywait -m -e access --format "%T %f" --timefmt "%D
>> %T" -r
>>> /path/to/files
>> Excuse me, the announcement application program is accessing this
>> folder from time to time to play the appropriate voice announcement
>> file . As there are a huge number of voice files inside this folder,
>> so I need some way to trace to see which file is being accessed when
>> hearing the corrupted voice file . I tried for your "watch" &
>> "inotifywait" utilities but I didn't see any log even when
>> intentionally trying to ftp some files into this folder. It seems that
>> my previous explanation of the problem was not so clear. Sorry again .
>> What can I do to find an appropriate trace method for my case in your
>> opinion ?
>
> Your previous explanation of the problem was very clear...
> Here is an example when I do:
> # inotifywait -m -e access --format "%T %f" --timefmt "%D %T" -r
> /home/jd/tmp
> Setting up watches. Beware: since -r was given, this may take a while!
> Watches established.
> $ less toto.php
> ...
> 10/10/11 12:33:21 toto.php
> It detected my read access to the file 'toto.php' in '/home/jd/tmp'
>
> JD
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
Excuse me, you are right. I tried again with your "inotifywait"
utility and it notifies me when touching a file . It seems that my
previous attempt had something wrong in it. But it seems that the
"watch" utility brings nothing . Am I right?
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 10-11-2011, 12:36 PM
Les Mikesell
 
Default trace?

On Tue, Oct 11, 2011 at 6:53 AM, hadi motamedi <motamedi24@gmail.com> wrote:

>>>>> *How about something like this:
>>>>> *watch -n 1 lsof /path/to/files
>>>>
>>>> *Or maybe:
>>>> * *inotifywait -m -e access --format "%T %f" --timefmt "%D
>>> %T" -r
>>>> */path/to/files

> Excuse me, you are right. I tried again with your "inotifywait"
> utility and it notifies me when touching a file . It seems that my
> previous attempt had something wrong in it. But it seems that the
> "watch" utility brings nothing . Am I right?

intofywait should be event-driven where watch would run the specified
command at intervals so it would be a matter of chance to catch a
momentary event. You might also be able to see what files had been
accessed most recently with 'ls -lurt' in the directory which will
sort the most recently accessed file to the end of the list.

--
Les Mikesell
lesmikesell@gmail.com
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 10-11-2011, 01:03 PM
hadi motamedi
 
Default trace?

On 10/11/11, Les Mikesell <lesmikesell@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Tue, Oct 11, 2011 at 6:53 AM, hadi motamedi <motamedi24@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>>>>>> How about something like this:
>>>>>> watch -n 1 lsof /path/to/files
>>>>>
>>>>> Or maybe:
>>>>> inotifywait -m -e access --format "%T %f" --timefmt "%D
>>>> %T" -r
>>>>> /path/to/files
>
>> Excuse me, you are right. I tried again with your "inotifywait"
>> utility and it notifies me when touching a file . It seems that my
>> previous attempt had something wrong in it. But it seems that the
>> "watch" utility brings nothing . Am I right?
>
> intofywait should be event-driven where watch would run the specified
> command at intervals so it would be a matter of chance to catch a
> momentary event. You might also be able to see what files had been
> accessed most recently with 'ls -lurt' in the directory which will
> sort the most recently accessed file to the end of the list.
>
> --
> Les Mikesell
> lesmikesell@gmail.com
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
Thank you very much for your help. I tested again and you are right.
If I have chance the 'watch' utility can capture the required event as
well. At the other hand, you introduced me with the 'ls -lurt' new
utility that is helpful my case . So thank you again
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 

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