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-   -   Installing yesterday's CentOS (or how to install the patch/package set from 3 weeks ago) (http://www.linux-archive.org/centos/578633-installing-yesterdays-centos-how-install-patch-package-set-3-weeks-ago.html)

Aleksey Tsalolikhin 09-22-2011 03:13 AM

Installing yesterday's CentOS (or how to install the patch/package set from 3 weeks ago)
 
Hello,

Let's say your operating policy is "no patch updates without testing
first in the test environment". Let's say it takes you 3 weeks to
test. Over the course of the 3 weeks, the repo changes (new
packages added, old removed).

Is there a way to "freeze" a set of packages so that when I
run "yum update" on a Prod server it'll get the same package
and patch set as the Test server did 3 weeks ago?

It's been suggested to maintain a local mirror, and take rsync
snapshots of it daily, so then you can point the end node to a
particular repository.

What other solutions are there?

Best,
-at
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Trey Dockendorf 09-22-2011 07:24 AM

Installing yesterday's CentOS (or how to install the patch/package set from 3 weeks ago)
 
I think a local mirror is really your best option.* Or possibly two repos.* One for testing, which you sync when you want to test updates and point all test systems at it.* Then a production repo for production systems that pulls from the frozen test repo.* One addition to your idea would be to use git.* That way all you have to do is a 'git push' when you want to update your production repo.* Could then use other features in git for tracking changes, possible reverts and such.



- Trey

On Sep 21, 2011 10:14 PM, "Aleksey Tsalolikhin" <atsaloli.tech@gmail.com> wrote:> Hello,
>
> Let's say your operating policy is "no patch updates without testing

> first in the test environment". Let's say it takes you 3 weeks to
> test. Over the course of the 3 weeks, the repo changes (new
> packages added, old removed).
>
> Is there a way to "freeze" a set of packages so that when I

> run "yum update" on a Prod server it'll get the same package
> and patch set as the Test server did 3 weeks ago?
>
> It's been suggested to maintain a local mirror, and take rsync

> snapshots of it daily, so then you can point the end node to a
> particular repository.
>
> What other solutions are there?
>
> Best,
> -at
> _______________________________________________

> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos

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Johnny Hughes 09-23-2011 01:35 PM

Installing yesterday's CentOS (or how to install the patch/package set from 3 weeks ago)
 
On 09/21/2011 10:13 PM, Aleksey Tsalolikhin wrote:
> Hello,
>
> Let's say your operating policy is "no patch updates without testing
> first in the test environment". Let's say it takes you 3 weeks to
> test. Over the course of the 3 weeks, the repo changes (new
> packages added, old removed).
>
> Is there a way to "freeze" a set of packages so that when I
> run "yum update" on a Prod server it'll get the same package
> and patch set as the Test server did 3 weeks ago?
>
> It's been suggested to maintain a local mirror, and take rsync
> snapshots of it daily, so then you can point the end node to a
> particular repository.
>
> What other solutions are there?

There is no solution to do updates that are different than the mainline
tree, except to maintain your own repo.

You have to publish the tree of tested RPMS, then you need to make sure
that those packages all work together (run a repoclosure), then you run
createrepo and update from your repo (that only contains tested packages
which are verified by you).

You could do some kind of find command with time in it to populate your
test repo ... but I personally populate mine with RPMs after I test them.

Of course, this puts the burden of testing and maintaining that repo on
you ... but you are the only one who can decide how much testing is
enough and what needs to be tested before you move a new RPM (or set of
RPMS) into production.


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