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Old 07-13-2011, 01:56 PM
Jerry Geis
 
Default centos x11

So there is longer an xorg.conf file in centos 6. Where is that stored now?

When I am running host C5 and guest C6 using kvm all I can get is 800x600.
They System->Preferences->Display app only has "detect monitor".
There is no LCD selection anymore that would then allow me to select
something higher than 800x600.

I tried a "-g" option for qemu-system-x86_64
-g WxH[xDEPTH] Set the initial graphical resolution and depth

But that does now work

So how do increase my kvm screen size with C5 host and C6 guest, and
where or how is
X controlled now with no xorg.conf ?

Thanks, loving the later kernel on C6. great job C6 team.

Jerry
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Old 07-13-2011, 02:18 PM
 
Default centos x11

Jerry Geis wrote:
> So there is longer an xorg.conf file in centos 6. Where is that stored
> now?
>
> When I am running host C5 and guest C6 using kvm all I can get is 800x600.
> They System->Preferences->Display app only has "detect monitor".
> There is no LCD selection anymore that would then allow me to select
> something higher than 800x600.

I think one's still created, where it was in /etc/X11. I *REALLY* am not
happy - I had to screw around for a while getting mine to work right:
brand new, as I've mentioned, Dell Precision 3500 with an Nvidia card.
There's no system-config-display, apparently, so I had to use startx. Then
it didn't detect the second monitor. I installed kmod-nvidia from elrepo,
and then had to rmmod nouveau, then I had to copy my xorg.conf from my old
system: didn't identify the monitor, didn't offer me the option to
manually configure/choose the monitor, and on, and on.
<snip>
> So how do increase my kvm screen size with C5 host and C6 guest, and
> where or how is X controlled now with no xorg.conf ?

If the host X works the way you want, try copying /etc/X11/xorg.conf to
the guest.

mark

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Old 07-13-2011, 03:09 PM
Ljubomir Ljubojevic
 
Default centos x11

m.roth@5-cent.us wrote:
> Jerry Geis wrote:
>> So there is longer an xorg.conf file in centos 6. Where is that stored
>> now?
>>
>> When I am running host C5 and guest C6 using kvm all I can get is 800x600.
>> They System->Preferences->Display app only has "detect monitor".
>> There is no LCD selection anymore that would then allow me to select
>> something higher than 800x600.
>
> I think one's still created, where it was in /etc/X11. I *REALLY* am not
> happy - I had to screw around for a while getting mine to work right:
> brand new, as I've mentioned, Dell Precision 3500 with an Nvidia card.
> There's no system-config-display, apparently, so I had to use startx. Then
> it didn't detect the second monitor. I installed kmod-nvidia from elrepo,
> and then had to rmmod nouveau, then I had to copy my xorg.conf from my old
> system: didn't identify the monitor, didn't offer me the option to
> manually configure/choose the monitor, and on, and on.
> <snip>
>> So how do increase my kvm screen size with C5 host and C6 guest, and
>> where or how is X controlled now with no xorg.conf ?
>
> If the host X works the way you want, try copying /etc/X11/xorg.conf to
> the guest.
>

Based on my experience on RHEL Beta1, "Xorg --configure" will create
xorg.conf which you can then tweak and use. On older Intel graphics chip
I had to use "nomodeset" kernel option to have normal picture.

New Xorg tries to read EDID information from monitor but monitor makers
EDID code is not always compatible with what Xorg expects. That is why
you get only minimal resolution and need xorg.conf file.

Ljubomir

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Old 07-13-2011, 03:09 PM
Ljubomir Ljubojevic
 
Default centos x11

m.roth@5-cent.us wrote:
> Jerry Geis wrote:
>> So there is longer an xorg.conf file in centos 6. Where is that stored
>> now?
>>
>> When I am running host C5 and guest C6 using kvm all I can get is 800x600.
>> They System->Preferences->Display app only has "detect monitor".
>> There is no LCD selection anymore that would then allow me to select
>> something higher than 800x600.
>
> I think one's still created, where it was in /etc/X11. I *REALLY* am not
> happy - I had to screw around for a while getting mine to work right:
> brand new, as I've mentioned, Dell Precision 3500 with an Nvidia card.
> There's no system-config-display, apparently, so I had to use startx. Then
> it didn't detect the second monitor. I installed kmod-nvidia from elrepo,
> and then had to rmmod nouveau, then I had to copy my xorg.conf from my old
> system: didn't identify the monitor, didn't offer me the option to
> manually configure/choose the monitor, and on, and on.
> <snip>
>> So how do increase my kvm screen size with C5 host and C6 guest, and
>> where or how is X controlled now with no xorg.conf ?
>
> If the host X works the way you want, try copying /etc/X11/xorg.conf to
> the guest.
>

Based on my experience on RHEL Beta1, "Xorg --configure" will create
xorg.conf which you can then tweak and use. On older Intel graphics chip
I had to use "nomodeset" kernel option to have normal picture.

New Xorg tries to read EDID information from monitor but monitor makers
EDID code is not always compatible with what Xorg expects. That is why
you get only minimal resolution and need xorg.conf file.

Ljubomir

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Old 07-13-2011, 08:10 PM
Ron Blizzard
 
Default centos x11

On Wed, Jul 13, 2011 at 10:09 AM, Ljubomir Ljubojevic <office@plnet.rs> wrote:

> Based on my experience on RHEL Beta1, "Xorg --configure" will create
> xorg.conf which you can then tweak and use. On older Intel graphics chip
> I had to use "nomodeset" kernel option to have normal picture.
>
> New Xorg tries to read EDID information from monitor but monitor makers
> EDID code is not always compatible with what Xorg expects. That is why
> you get only minimal resolution and need xorg.conf file.

I've had to fight this lack of xorg.conf in other distributions --
that and the nouveau video driver and grub2 -- and was kind of
dreading the day it would come to CentOS. At least we didn't get Gnome
3. Not quite sure why these kinds of changes are being made, but there
are a lot of things I don't understand -- and I'm sure there are good
reasons for all of it. I'll just adjust and find ways to work around
it.

--
RonB -- Using CentOS 5.6
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Old 07-13-2011, 08:13 PM
Craig White
 
Default centos x11

On Jul 13, 2011, at 1:10 PM, Ron Blizzard wrote:

> On Wed, Jul 13, 2011 at 10:09 AM, Ljubomir Ljubojevic <office@plnet.rs> wrote:
>
>> Based on my experience on RHEL Beta1, "Xorg --configure" will create
>> xorg.conf which you can then tweak and use. On older Intel graphics chip
>> I had to use "nomodeset" kernel option to have normal picture.
>>
>> New Xorg tries to read EDID information from monitor but monitor makers
>> EDID code is not always compatible with what Xorg expects. That is why
>> you get only minimal resolution and need xorg.conf file.
>
> I've had to fight this lack of xorg.conf in other distributions --
> that and the nouveau video driver and grub2 -- and was kind of
> dreading the day it would come to CentOS. At least we didn't get Gnome
> 3. Not quite sure why these kinds of changes are being made, but there
> are a lot of things I don't understand -- and I'm sure there are good
> reasons for all of it. I'll just adjust and find ways to work around
> it.
----
the reason that you don't want an xorg.conf file is that multiple users can have different display settings instead of being locked in by an overall configuration file.

Craig
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Old 07-13-2011, 08:21 PM
 
Default centos x11

Craig White wrote:
>
> On Jul 13, 2011, at 1:10 PM, Ron Blizzard wrote:
>
>> On Wed, Jul 13, 2011 at 10:09 AM, Ljubomir Ljubojevic <office@plnet.rs>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Based on my experience on RHEL Beta1, "Xorg --configure" will create
>>> xorg.conf which you can then tweak and use. On older Intel graphics
>>> chip I had to use "nomodeset" kernel option to have normal picture.
>>>
>>> New Xorg tries to read EDID information from monitor but monitor makers
>>> EDID code is not always compatible with what Xorg expects. That is why
>>> you get only minimal resolution and need xorg.conf file.
>>
>> I've had to fight this lack of xorg.conf in other distributions --
>> that and the nouveau video driver and grub2 -- and was kind of
>> dreading the day it would come to CentOS. At least we didn't get Gnome
>> 3. Not quite sure why these kinds of changes are being made, but there
>> are a lot of things I don't understand -- and I'm sure there are good
>> reasons for all of it. I'll just adjust and find ways to work around
>> it.
> ----
> the reason that you don't want an xorg.conf file is that multiple users
> can have different display settings instead of being locked in by an
> overall configuration file.

So, you aren't nfs mounting home directories? You can have individual ones
on your own workstation.

mark

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Old 07-13-2011, 08:25 PM
Ron Blizzard
 
Default centos x11

On Wed, Jul 13, 2011 at 3:13 PM, Craig White <craig.white@ttiltd.com> wrote:

> the reason that you don't want an xorg.conf file is that multiple users can have different display settings instead of being locked in by an overall configuration file.

Okay. But I've always left my root account at default video settings
and changed my user account's video settings, and it seemed to work
fine that way before? But, I think, once you install the proprietary
nVidia driver, that an xorg.conf is built anyhow -- so this probably
won't be an issue for me.

--
RonB -- Using CentOS 5.6
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Old 07-13-2011, 08:47 PM
Ljubomir Ljubojevic
 
Default centos x11

Ron Blizzard wrote:
> On Wed, Jul 13, 2011 at 3:13 PM, Craig White <craig.white@ttiltd.com> wrote:
>
>> the reason that you don't want an xorg.conf file is that multiple users can have different display settings instead of being locked in by an overall configuration file.
>
> Okay. But I've always left my root account at default video settings
> and changed my user account's video settings, and it seemed to work
> fine that way before? But, I think, once you install the proprietary
> nVidia driver, that an xorg.conf is built anyhow -- so this probably
> won't be an issue for me.
>
xorg.conf only defines what resolutions, depths,... *can* be selected.
You can add 100000x50000 pixels in xorg.conf and never ever use it.
Users resolution is set in Gnome/KDE, not in xorg.conf.

Ljubomir
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