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Old 05-18-2011, 12:58 PM
Drew
 
Default KVM vs ESXi

Morning Everyone,

I'm busy doing a rebuild of my home server and am tossing between
VMware and KVM for this build. I already have experience with ESX, we
use it at work, but I'm debating trying out KVM for a while. The
server itself is a budget build using a Supermicro X8SAX board w/
i7-950 & 12GB RAM, LSI 3081 SAS RAID (1068e based), rolled into a
NorcoTek 16 Bay SAS case. Not fancy but also decent enough for home
use. I don't expect high performance out of this unit so unless the
gear is hopelessly outclassed, I'm not in a position to entertain
upgrading. Right now forking over $1000-$1500 on a $2000 system for a
pair of higher end LSI/3ware/Acreca controller just isn't in the
budget. ;-)

My question to everyone are these:

-How well does KVM support Windows Guests? I'm already running a
Server 2008r2 and WHS 2011 (based on 08r2) machines at home which I
want to consolidate into this box.

-Does KVM have a concept of virtual switches and and are they tied to
physical NICs? ESXi allows me to create a vSwitch that isn't tied to a
physical NIC so I can create a DMZ that exists solely within the host
system. I'd like to replicate that if possible.

I know these are probably questions that I could answer on my own by
RTFM but I have already, and never really got the answers I needed.
Pretty much every how-to assumed I'd be doing basic stuff and not
dabbling with advanced stuff. I also know that what's written doesn't
always match what's in the field and you folks are the field. And with
CentOS 6 just around the corner (no flame wars please, my nomex pants
are at the cleaners :-P ) I'm wanting to know if it's worth holding
off another month or so on finalizing my build.

Thanks,


--
Drew

"Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood."
--Marie Curie
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Old 05-18-2011, 05:56 PM
Markus Falb
 
Default KVM vs ESXi

On 18.5.2011 14:58, Drew wrote:

> -Does KVM have a concept of virtual switches and and are they tied to
> physical NICs? ESXi allows me to create a vSwitch that isn't tied to a
> physical NIC so I can create a DMZ that exists solely within the host
> system. I'd like to replicate that if possible.

A switch is basically a bridge built in hardware, isn't it ?

Configure /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-brX
and in the kvm config for the virtual machine do

<interface type='bridge'>
...
<source bridge='brX'/>
...
</interface>

--
Kind Regards, Markus Falb

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Old 05-19-2011, 04:39 AM
Lucian
 
Default KVM vs ESXi

On Wed, May 18, 2011 at 1:58 PM, Drew wrote:
>
> My question to everyone are these:
>
> -How well does KVM support Windows Guests? I'm already running a
> Server 2008r2 and WHS 2011 (based on 08r2) machines at home which I
> want to consolidate into this box.

They run well enough for me. Don't have any benchmarks as I am not
using any other full virt solutions, but don't see much difference
between VMs and bare metal. On the other hand I try not to use windows
servers for anything serious so they're hardly ever stressed.

>
> -Does KVM have a concept of virtual switches and and are they tied to
> physical NICs? ESXi allows me to create a vSwitch that isn't tied to a
> physical NIC so I can create a DMZ that exists solely within the host
> system. I'd like to replicate that if possible.

No and I don't think it's the hypervisor's job to do that. Even in
ESXi I don't think it's the "hypervisor" itself that does that. You
could try however to mess with Openvswitch if you insist on such
features, at least until someone decides to package all this in one
fancy solution (rhev?).

Lucian
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Old 05-19-2011, 06:30 AM
Fajar Priyanto
 
Default KVM vs ESXi

On Wed, May 18, 2011 at 8:58 PM, Drew <drew.kay@gmail.com> wrote:
> My question to everyone are these:

> -Does KVM have a concept of virtual switches and and are they tied to
> physical NICs? ESXi allows me to create a vSwitch that isn't tied to a
> physical NIC so I can create a DMZ that exists solely within the host
> system. I'd like to replicate that if possible.

http://bitbud.com/2008/08/20/how-to-setup-a-private-network-for-virtual-guests-in-kvm-2/
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Old 05-19-2011, 10:56 AM
Michael Simpson
 
Default KVM vs ESXi

On 19 May 2011 05:39, Lucian <lucian@lastdot.org> wrote:

> No and I don't think it's the hypervisor's job to do that. Even in
> ESXi I don't think it's the "hypervisor" itself that does that. You
> could try however to mess with Openvswitch if you insist on such
> features, at least until someone decides to package all this in one
> fancy solution (rhev?).
>
thank you for pointing out openvswitch very interesting

wrt the OP

KVM is meant to be much closer to bare metal performance but doesn't
have (at the moment) the all inclusive, easily managed from one
console, turnkey solution to massive virtual installs at the
datacentre level. If you need to be able to remotely provision VMs and
move them whilst live from one centre to another whilst upscaling them
then you will probably need to go with vmware. If you have got the
flattened layer2 setup and have got to the stage of using vSwitch or
the full cisco stack including provisioned nexus1000v then you might
find kvm is a bit of a step backwards.

However i would recommend having a KVM based test suite as judging by
the latest PaaS and IaaS news coming from TUV then a full solution
will be appearing real soon and may be a contender.

If you are just looking to footer about and are after a provisioned
host in a dmz then libvirt can achieve this.

mike
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Old 05-19-2011, 11:27 AM
Lars Hecking
 
Default KVM vs ESXi

> KVM is meant to be much closer to bare metal performance but doesn't
> have (at the moment) the all inclusive, easily managed from one
> console, turnkey solution to massive virtual installs at the
> datacentre level. If you need to be able to remotely provision VMs and
> move them whilst live from one centre to another whilst upscaling them
> then you will probably need to go with vmware. If you have got the

Mike,

Are you familiar with any of the tools listed here

http://www.linux-kvm.org/page/Management_Tools

e.g. Proxmox, ConVirt, OpenNebula, Ganeti, openQRM? Comments?


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Old 05-19-2011, 11:53 AM
Alain Péan
 
Default KVM vs ESXi

Le 19/05/2011 13:27, Lars Hecking a écrit :
>> KVM is meant to be much closer to bare metal performance but doesn't
>> have (at the moment) the all inclusive, easily managed from one
>> console, turnkey solution to massive virtual installs at the
>> datacentre level. If you need to be able to remotely provision VMs and
>> move them whilst live from one centre to another whilst upscaling them
>> then you will probably need to go with vmware. If you have got the
> Mike,
>
> Are you familiar with any of the tools listed here
>
> http://www.linux-kvm.org/page/Management_Tools
>
> e.g. Proxmox, ConVirt, OpenNebula, Ganeti, openQRM? Comments?
>

Hi Lars,

I am using Proxmox. It is based on Debian. It is a bare metal installer,
like ESX. You manage your VMs from a web interface. You can live migrate
your VMs from one node to another if you use a central storage or DRDB.
The bare metal installer takes care of all the initial configuration
(bridge, LVM for snapshot...).

I wait to see what will do RHEVM, but at this time, I am not aware of
such a convenient solution under RHEL/CentOS...

Alain

--
================================================== ========
Alain Péan - LPP/CNRS
Administrateur Système/Réseau
Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas - UMR 7648
Observatoire de Saint-Maur
4, av de Neptune, Bat. A
94100 Saint-Maur des Fossés
Tel : 01-45-11-42-39 - Fax : 01-48-89-44-33
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