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Old 05-05-2011, 11:13 AM
Timothy Murphy
 
Default How to copy a system?

Is there a standard way of copying a working system
from one machine to another with different partitions?

I have two CentOS-5.6 machines, say A and B,
and I thought I would copy / on sdb10 on machine A
to an unused partition sda7 on machine B with rsync.
I made the appropriate changes to /etc/fstab and grub.conf ,
as well as /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts ,
but found that there were innumerable errors
when I booted machine B into the new system,
mostly to do with creating dev's.
Also the ethernet connection, which had been eth1 on A,
was now eth0 on B, and this did not work.

This was only a kind of experiment.
There is a problem with the partition table on machine A,
and I thought it would be useful to have a backup machine
with exactly the same setup.

Is this a hopeless enterprise, or can it be done easily?

--
Timothy Murphy
e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

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Old 05-05-2011, 11:24 AM
Robert Heller
 
Default How to copy a system?

At Thu, 05 May 2011 12:13:18 +0100 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
> Is there a standard way of copying a working system
> from one machine to another with different partitions?
>
> I have two CentOS-5.6 machines, say A and B,
> and I thought I would copy / on sdb10 on machine A
> to an unused partition sda7 on machine B with rsync.
> I made the appropriate changes to /etc/fstab and grub.conf ,
> as well as /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts ,
> but found that there were innumerable errors
> when I booted machine B into the new system,
> mostly to do with creating dev's.
> Also the ethernet connection, which had been eth1 on A,
> was now eth0 on B, and this did not work.

It sounds like you have problems *other* the 'copy' part.

After copying the system, you will likely need to remake the initrd on
the target system. Oh, you will need to edit /etc/modprobe.conf:
different SATA driver, different ethernet driver, etc.

>
> This was only a kind of experiment.
> There is a problem with the partition table on machine A,
> and I thought it would be useful to have a backup machine
> with exactly the same setup.
>
> Is this a hopeless enterprise, or can it be done easily?

It is easy enough to do. There are just a few more things involved
besides copying the data and diddling with grub.conf, /etc/fatab, and
/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts. You just forgot about /etc/modprobe.conf
and forgot to remake the the initrd.

>

--
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933 / heller@deepsoft.com
Deepwoods Software -- http://www.deepsoft.com/
() ascii ribbon campaign -- against html e-mail
/ www.asciiribbon.org -- against proprietary attachments



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Old 05-05-2011, 11:44 AM
"Martes G Wigglesworth"
 
Default How to copy a system?

On 05/05/2011 07:13 AM, Timothy Murphy wrote:
> Is there a standard way of copying a working system
> from one machine to another with different partitions?
You could also utilize cloning software, such as the client version of
drbl, clonezilla livecd.

You could also do a direct copy with dd onto a connected drive.

You may be well served by looking into drbl, or clonezilla.

--
Respectfully,


Martes G Wigglesworth
M. G. Wigglesworth Holdings, LLC
www.mgwigglesworth.net

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Old 05-05-2011, 11:56 AM
Robert Heller
 
Default How to copy a system?

At Thu, 05 May 2011 07:44:52 -0400 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
>
> On 05/05/2011 07:13 AM, Timothy Murphy wrote:
> > Is there a standard way of copying a working system
> > from one machine to another with different partitions?
> You could also utilize cloning software, such as the client version of
> drbl, clonezilla livecd.
>
> You could also do a direct copy with dd onto a connected drive.

Warning: dd is not a good choise if the source and desination
drives/partitions are *different* sizes.

>
> You may be well served by looking into drbl, or clonezilla.
>

--
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933 / heller@deepsoft.com
Deepwoods Software -- http://www.deepsoft.com/
() ascii ribbon campaign -- against html e-mail
/ www.asciiribbon.org -- against proprietary attachments



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Old 05-05-2011, 12:01 PM
"Brunner, Brian T."
 
Default How to copy a system?

centos-bounces@centos.org wrote:
> At Thu, 05 May 2011 07:44:52 -0400 CentOS mailing list
> <centos@centos.org> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> On 05/05/2011 07:13 AM, Timothy Murphy wrote:
>>> Is there a standard way of copying a working system
>>> from one machine to another with different partitions?
>> You could also utilize cloning software, such as the client version
>> of drbl, clonezilla livecd.
>>
>> You could also do a direct copy with dd onto a connected drive.
>
> Warning: dd is not a good choise if the source and desination
> drives/partitions are *different* sizes.

Different block mappings will also give you grief.
.:. The drives must be identical manufacturer and model, down to the
firmware revision.
dd is not a backup tool in the general sense.

Insert spiffy .sig here:
Life is complex: it has both real and imaginary parts.

//me
************************************************** *****************
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Old 05-05-2011, 01:03 PM
Les Mikesell
 
Default How to copy a system?

On 5/5/11 6:13 AM, Timothy Murphy wrote:
> Is there a standard way of copying a working system
> from one machine to another with different partitions?
>
> I have two CentOS-5.6 machines, say A and B,
> and I thought I would copy / on sdb10 on machine A
> to an unused partition sda7 on machine B with rsync.
> I made the appropriate changes to /etc/fstab and grub.conf ,
> as well as /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts ,
> but found that there were innumerable errors
> when I booted machine B into the new system,
> mostly to do with creating dev's.

That's normal. Anaconda does a bit of magic during the install in detecting the
hardware and setting things up for it. Within limits, running kudzu will adjust
some of them and sometimes it will kick off automatically when hardware
differences are detected.

> Also the ethernet connection, which had been eth1 on A,
> was now eth0 on B, and this did not work.

That will always happen even what you think is identical hardware, but if you
are at the machine you can fix it manually. If kudzu runs it will set up the
interfaces for dhcp and discard your old settings.

> This was only a kind of experiment.
> There is a problem with the partition table on machine A,
> and I thought it would be useful to have a backup machine
> with exactly the same setup.
>
> Is this a hopeless enterprise, or can it be done easily?

Neither. It isn't easy and I think that is a real deficiency in Linux
distributions because most people probably think they can have their backups
working quickly if their machine dies. But, it also isn't hopeless - you just
have to know as much about hardware and drivers as anaconda does. Or you can
cheat and do an install on the new machine first and keep at least the initrd or
all of /boot and perhaps modprobe.conf and a few other things. In general it is
better to plan for a new install and have backups that don't overwrite the
system part but there is not a clean separation between system files and you
own, so plan to spend a lot of time sorting out things from your backups of /etc
and /var and merging them.

--
Les Mikesell
lesmikesell@gmail.com



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