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Old 04-28-2011, 06:17 AM
Emmanuel Noobadmin
 
Default Install CentOS as KVM guest

On 4/28/11, Jussi Hirvi <listmember@greenspot.fi> wrote:
> I tried it too, didn't work. Try virt-install without creating the image
> first. Virt-install will create the image (type "raw") on the go. If you
> want qcow2, you can convert the image later. Qcow2 has some special
> features but is slower than raw.

I'll give that a spin next, although the disks file I created are RAW
as well. The problem wth using virt-install to create files is that it
takes forever, I've no idea why.


> No, I definitely did not do that. I don't know why that would be needed.

That's what I'm puzzling over. But reading up so far seems to imply
that it acts as a way for qemu/KVM to receive and inject network
traffic into the kernel network stack.

> The double slash does not look good... On next try, try it with no slash
> at the end of ip, and no slash at the beginning of path. (But keep the
> last slash.) :-)

The installer adds that double slash, it was one of the first oddity I
noted. But googling indicates that this was normal and testing it,
indicates that the URL was valid. I suppose it just meant root of root
which is still root

Anyway I tried out different variations just to be safe, but whether I
used /Centos56 or Centos56 or Centos56/, the same url comes up. The
installer apparently does some basic sanitization of the parameters.

>> So it seems to me that the VM's networking is wrong somehow.
>> Especially since the assigned IP is not pingable during this point.
>> But I can't be sure if that's just because the OS is still being
>> installed.
>
> I would not expect ping to work at that point. I would do
> virsh destroy myvm
> virsh undefine myvm
> virt-install again...

Those 3 are my most familiar vir* command at this point

As for the httpd log you mentioned in another email, that's also one
of the reason I keep suspecting that networking is the issue. There
are no entries in the httpd logs for the guest, but I can see my
external access entries.
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Old 04-28-2011, 07:48 AM
Simon Grinberg
 
Default Install CentOS as KVM guest

----- Original Message -----
> From: "Emmanuel Noobadmin" <centos.admin@gmail.com>
> To: "CentOS mailing list" <centos@centos.org>, "kvm" <kvm@vger.kernel.org>
> Sent: Tuesday, April 26, 2011 11:57:18 PM
> Subject: Re: [CentOS] Install CentOS as KVM guest
> Unfortunately, things still don't work.
>
> <rant>
> It's just ridiculous that the installer under KVM does not detect the
> cdrom drive it was booted from. Trying to do a net-install doesn't
> work, maybe I messed up the networking even though br0 and eth0 is
> working on the host.
>
> Nevermind, let's install apache and use the mounted ISO. Verified
> apache is working and the CentOS folder is accessible via web browser.
> But, still the guest installer cannot seem to access the installation
> files.
>
> OK, so maybe I messed up the networking, after all I am the noob...
> maybe specifying --network=bridge:br0 isn't enough. There was
> something about a tap or tunnel when initially reading up on bridged
> networking. Looking up more on this, there are several resources
> (sorry KVM FAQ leads to a page that no longer exist) which like many
> other instructions, give the commands without really explaining
> what/why.
>
> So I have to run some tunctl command and scripts to add a bridge and
> tunnel/tap... but wait, I already made my bridge, will running the
> script kill my networking by creating a second bridge? Especially the
> warning about temporarily loosing connectivity due to ifcfg1 being
> reset.
>
> And if I need to run this script everytime in order to activate the
> bridge and tunnel, doesn't that mean all my guest OS are screwed if
> the host reboots while I'm not around? Shouldn't these things go into
> permanent files like if-tun0 or something?
>
> Every year, I get a little closer to not using VMWare but it seems
> like this year is going to be victory for VMWare again.

What version of VMWare are you using?

>
> CC to kvm mailing list but I expect, like my previous request for help
> to the list, it will be rejected by mailman or a moderator.
> </rant>
>
> Just damn frustrated, even if it's probably just me being too stupid
> to know how to use KVM.
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
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Old 04-28-2011, 07:54 AM
Jussi Hirvi
 
Default Install CentOS as KVM guest

> On 4/28/11, Jussi Hirvi<listmember@greenspot.fi> wrote:
>>> Try virt-install without creating the image first.

On 28.4.2011 9.17, Emmanuel Noobadmin wrote:
> I'll give that a spin next, although the disks file I created are RAW
> as well. The problem wth using virt-install to create files is that it
> takes forever, I've no idea why.

For me creating the images does not take any noticeable time. Only when
the installer formats the "disk" to ext3 (or others), it will take some
time. Probably your syntax does not work. Try the syntax in my example, like

--disk path=/kvmail/mail.img,size=290

(making sure that the image does not exist beforehand).

>> > No, I definitely did not do that. I don't know why that would be needed.
> That's what I'm puzzling over. But reading up so far seems to imply
> that it acts as a way for qemu/KVM to receive and inject network
> traffic into the kernel network stack.

You are probably reading some outdated howtos. No wonder, because where
are the up-to-date howtos?? Red Hat Virtualization Guide is a nice book,
but only an overview - it does not go into the gritty details.

>> > The double slash does not look good... On next try, try it with no slash
>> > at the end of ip, and no slash at the beginning of path. (But keep the
>> > last slash.):-)
> The installer adds that double slash, it was one of the first oddity I
> noted. But googling indicates that this was normal and testing it,
> indicates that the URL was valid. I suppose it just meant root of root
> which is still root

I just got the double slash too on one installation try. I believe the
double slash is an error of the error messaging. :-) If so, it only
shows the level of "sophistication" of virt-install.

> Anyway I tried out different variations just to be safe, but whether I
> used /Centos56 or Centos56 or Centos56/, the same url comes up. The
> installer apparently does some basic sanitization of the parameters.

So it should. But that only "sanitizes" the error message, and
erroneously (producing a double slash). :-)

I am just installing CentOS 4. I tried it first without a trailing slash
in the path, and I got instantly "unable to get the image" or so. After
that I could not get the image again, whatever I did. I had to restart
the install from scratch, and then, after being sure to add the trailing
slash, I got the image at once.

If this is problem in Anaconda or virt-install, I am not sure.

> As for the httpd log you mentioned in another email, that's also one
> of the reason I keep suspecting that networking is the issue. There
> are no entries in the httpd logs for the guest, but I can see my
> external access entries.

Ok, that could be the case.

- Jussi
--
Jussi Hirvi * Green Spot
Suvilahdenkatu 1 B 78 * 00500 Helsinki * Finland
Tel. +358 9 493 981 * Mobile +358 40 771 2098 (only sms)
jussi.hirvi@greenspot.fi * http://www.greenspot.fi
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Old 04-28-2011, 08:36 AM
Emmanuel Noobadmin
 
Default Install CentOS as KVM guest

On 4/28/11, Simon Grinberg <simon@redhat.com> wrote:
> What version of VMWare are you using?

Currently, I'm not using VMWare yet on this new server as I really do
hope to be able to use an "unified" solution. But so far, it's just
one brickwall after another. I've given myself until this weekend to
get things working or just go the easy way.

Previously, I've used VMServer 2 as well as VMPlayer 3. All running
off CentOS 5.x host.
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Old 04-28-2011, 08:57 AM
Emmanuel Noobadmin
 
Default Install CentOS as KVM guest

On 4/28/11, Jussi Hirvi <listmember@greenspot.fi> wrote:
> For me creating the images does not take any noticeable time. Only when
> the installer formats the "disk" to ext3 (or others), it will take some
> time. Probably your syntax does not work. Try the syntax in my example, like
>
> --disk path=/kvmail/mail.img,size=290
>
> (making sure that the image does not exist beforehand).

Thanks for pointing out that it really is abnormal because it takes
about 2 hours for virt-install to create a 190G disk for me. I'll try
this on my next attempt.


> You are probably reading some outdated howtos. No wonder, because where
> are the up-to-date howtos?? Red Hat Virtualization Guide is a nice book,
> but only an overview - it does not go into the gritty details.

That's generally the issue, I've tried to use mostly information from
the newer pages/articles but still, most of them skip important
caveats/notes like the fact while specifying the ISO is good enough
for the GUI, it doesn't work with the CLI.

> I just got the double slash too on one installation try. I believe the
> double slash is an error of the error messaging. :-) If so, it only
> shows the level of "sophistication" of virt-install.

Damn!

> So it should. But that only "sanitizes" the error message, and
> erroneously (producing a double slash). :-)

But in any case, since I tried all kinds of variations on host IP and
directory, including stupidities like Centos56/images/ just in case.
So this doesn't seem to be the problem.

> If this is problem in Anaconda or virt-install, I am not sure.

Should be an anaconda issue I think since this is entirely within the
virtualized environment already?
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Old 04-28-2011, 11:46 AM
Emmanuel Noobadmin
 
Default Install CentOS as KVM guest

On 4/28/11, Gleb Natapov <gleb@redhat.com> wrote:
> So why don't you use virt-manager?

The original intention was to run the host without any graphical
desktop or anything not necessary to host the guests. That was based
on reading and such which recommends not having anything beyond the
necessary to minimize potential security problems and maximize
resources available.

Then there were those pages which warn that virt-manager didn't work
too well if bridged networking was required.

Last but not least, when I finally gave up and installed the desktop,
virt-manager couldn't find the hypervisor. Checking up, it appears
that the user needed additional permissions to certain files, which
after given and tested via CLI, I still get errors.

Starting up X as root gave me this ominous warning that I really
shouldn't be doing this and since I didn't think it was wise in the
first place to have the desktop with root access running on what's
supposed to be a production machine, I stopped trying that route and
went back to figuring how to get virt-install to work.
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Old 04-28-2011, 12:15 PM
Ljubomir Ljubojevic
 
Default Install CentOS as KVM guest

Emmanuel Noobadmin wrote:
> On 4/28/11, Gleb Natapov <gleb@redhat.com> wrote:
>> So why don't you use virt-manager?
>
> The original intention was to run the host without any graphical
> desktop or anything not necessary to host the guests. That was based
> on reading and such which recommends not having anything beyond the
> necessary to minimize potential security problems and maximize
> resources available.
>
> Then there were those pages which warn that virt-manager didn't work
> too well if bridged networking was required.
>
> Last but not least, when I finally gave up and installed the desktop,
> virt-manager couldn't find the hypervisor. Checking up, it appears
> that the user needed additional permissions to certain files, which
> after given and tested via CLI, I still get errors.
>
> Starting up X as root gave me this ominous warning that I really
> shouldn't be doing this and since I didn't think it was wise in the
> first place to have the desktop with root access running on what's
> supposed to be a production machine, I stopped trying that route and
> went back to figuring how to get virt-install to work.


I log in as root and setup KVM guest, set it to boot automatically and
next login as root is only if something is wrong.

Ljubomir


> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
>

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Old 04-28-2011, 01:18 PM
Johnny Hughes
 
Default Install CentOS as KVM guest

On 04/28/2011 06:46 AM, Emmanuel Noobadmin wrote:
> On 4/28/11, Gleb Natapov <gleb@redhat.com> wrote:
>> So why don't you use virt-manager?
>
> The original intention was to run the host without any graphical
> desktop or anything not necessary to host the guests. That was based
> on reading and such which recommends not having anything beyond the
> necessary to minimize potential security problems and maximize
> resources available.
>
> Then there were those pages which warn that virt-manager didn't work
> too well if bridged networking was required.
>
> Last but not least, when I finally gave up and installed the desktop,
> virt-manager couldn't find the hypervisor. Checking up, it appears
> that the user needed additional permissions to certain files, which
> after given and tested via CLI, I still get errors.
>
> Starting up X as root gave me this ominous warning that I really
> shouldn't be doing this and since I didn't think it was wise in the
> first place to have the desktop with root access running on what's
> supposed to be a production machine, I stopped trying that route and
> went back to figuring how to get virt-install to work.

You don't have to run an entire X desktop on the server to use
virt-manager there.

If you have a graphical linux workstation on the same network (x can be
slow across a WAN, so I would only do it locally), you can just do this
from the workstation with X running:

ssh -XY -l root <server_name>

then from the server do this:

virt-manager

This will run just the application "virt-manager" on the server and push
the video display back to your machine.

You may need to run this on the workstation before you ssh to the server
machine:

xhost +


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Old 04-28-2011, 01:18 PM
Johnny Hughes
 
Default Install CentOS as KVM guest

On 04/28/2011 06:46 AM, Emmanuel Noobadmin wrote:
> On 4/28/11, Gleb Natapov <gleb@redhat.com> wrote:
>> So why don't you use virt-manager?
>
> The original intention was to run the host without any graphical
> desktop or anything not necessary to host the guests. That was based
> on reading and such which recommends not having anything beyond the
> necessary to minimize potential security problems and maximize
> resources available.
>
> Then there were those pages which warn that virt-manager didn't work
> too well if bridged networking was required.
>
> Last but not least, when I finally gave up and installed the desktop,
> virt-manager couldn't find the hypervisor. Checking up, it appears
> that the user needed additional permissions to certain files, which
> after given and tested via CLI, I still get errors.
>
> Starting up X as root gave me this ominous warning that I really
> shouldn't be doing this and since I didn't think it was wise in the
> first place to have the desktop with root access running on what's
> supposed to be a production machine, I stopped trying that route and
> went back to figuring how to get virt-install to work.

You don't have to run an entire X desktop on the server to use
virt-manager there.

If you have a graphical linux workstation on the same network (x can be
slow across a WAN, so I would only do it locally), you can just do this
from the workstation with X running:

ssh -XY -l root <server_name>

then from the server do this:

virt-manager

This will run just the application "virt-manager" on the server and push
the video display back to your machine.

You may need to run this on the workstation before you ssh to the server
machine:

xhost +


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Old 04-28-2011, 02:32 PM
R P Herrold
 
Default Install CentOS as KVM guest

On Thu, 28 Apr 2011, Emmanuel Noobadmin wrote:

> Thanks for pointing out that it really is abnormal because
> it takes about 2 hours for virt-install to create a 190G
> disk for me.

As you are having issues with the install, I might suggest
creating a more modest sized disk image, at least during
testing --- It would be a rare test case that would need more
than 8 G for a CentOS image while you are still solving setup
issues

We have supported guest images up to 400G for one user who
kept re-sizing an image up and up from an initial 4G to over
400 G ... eventually the 2 1/2 hour lag in moving content from
one big image to another bigger image caused him to ask why it
was taking so long. When our interface 'resizes' an image,
it takes a safety snapshot first to an NFS backup store,
tests is, and only then deletes the old image and creates the
old one ... so it takes a while for images over say 100 G.

The delays you note do not surprise me -- it takes time to
reliably shuttle bits around a disk, and no cacheing effects
are possible with off the shelf setups (i.e., lacking huge
memory based drives) to support such large image sizes

-- Russ herrold
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