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Old 04-24-2011, 02:02 PM
Timothy Murphy
 
Default Attaching LinkSys WRT54GL to CentOS machine

I have a LinkSys WRT54GL router,
which I would like to attach to my CentOS-5.6 server,
to set up a LAN 192.168.2.* .
The server is attached to the internet
through a Billion modem/router which has a single ethernet outlet.

The instructions for the LinkSys router
assume that it is being attached directly to an ADSL modem.
But for various reasons I want everything to go through my server.

I wonder if anyone has set up a system like this?
If so, I'd be grateful for advice on how to do it.


--
Timothy Murphy
e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

_______________________________________________
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Old 04-24-2011, 03:08 PM
Kenni Lund
 
Default Attaching LinkSys WRT54GL to CentOS machine

2011/4/24 Timothy Murphy <gayleard@eircom.net>:
> I have a LinkSys WRT54GL router,
> which I would like to attach to my CentOS-5.6 server,
> to set up a LAN 192.168.2.* .
> The server is attached to the internet
> through a Billion modem/router which has a single ethernet outlet.
>
> The instructions for the LinkSys router
> assume that it is being attached directly to an ADSL modem.
> But for various reasons I want everything to go through my server.

Without any information on what the purpose of such a setup would be,
it's close to impossible to give you any recommendations. Is it
because you want to use your CentOS system as a firewall? a router? a
HTTP proxy? a network sniffer?

Or is it because you only have one external ethernet outlet and you
want to access the internet on your other systems, while the services
on your server still can be accessed from the outside? In the last
case, you would normally just put your server on the LAN and do
port-forwarding on your router. If it's because you want your server
to be "outside" of your LAN, a more correct approach would be to setup
a DMZ zone on your router, dedicate one of the LAN ports as DMZ port
and connect your server there.

> I wonder if anyone has set up a system like this?

Perhaps, perhaps not, depends on what the purpose of the system is.

Best regards
Kenni
_______________________________________________
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Old 04-24-2011, 03:34 PM
Robert Heller
 
Default Attaching LinkSys WRT54GL to CentOS machine

At Sun, 24 Apr 2011 17:08:50 +0200 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
> 2011/4/24 Timothy Murphy <gayleard@eircom.net>:
> > I have a LinkSys WRT54GL router,
> > which I would like to attach to my CentOS-5.6 server,
> > to set up a LAN 192.168.2.* .
> > The server is attached to the internet
> > through a Billion modem/router which has a single ethernet outlet.
> >
> > The instructions for the LinkSys router
> > assume that it is being attached directly to an ADSL modem.
> > But for various reasons I want everything to go through my server.
>
> Without any information on what the purpose of such a setup would be,
> it's close to impossible to give you any recommendations. Is it
> because you want to use your CentOS system as a firewall? a router? a
> HTTP proxy? a network sniffer?
>
> Or is it because you only have one external ethernet outlet and you
> want to access the internet on your other systems, while the services
> on your server still can be accessed from the outside? In the last
> case, you would normally just put your server on the LAN and do
> port-forwarding on your router. If it's because you want your server
> to be "outside" of your LAN, a more correct approach would be to setup
> a DMZ zone on your router, dedicate one of the LAN ports as DMZ port
> and connect your server there.
>
> > I wonder if anyone has set up a system like this?
>
> Perhaps, perhaps not, depends on what the purpose of the system is.

I would guess that the OP just wants a Wireless Access Point. It is
hard (impossible at retail outlets) to get 'just an Access Point',
although I think Linksys, et. al. still make just plain Access Points
these are no longer commonly available at the retail level.

I am using a Netgear 'Wireless Router' as an Access Point. *I* don't
even have broadband Internet at all (I use dialup). Just leave the WAN
jack unconnected. Use a machine with a wired network (RJ45) that gets
its IP address via DHCP and connect this with an Cat5 cable to any of
the LAN ports on the Router, let it get an address automagically from
the router and connect to the router via the router's default IP
address with a web browser. You should then be able to 'login' to the
admin pages using the default username and password. If you can, you
can disable the WAN (in the case of the cheap Netgear box, you can't
and it will bitch and moan about not having internet access to check
for firmware updates -- I just ignore it). I just disable the router's
DHCP server, set its IP address to something consistent with my LAN (a
static IP address in the same subnet, with the proper netmask, etc.),
tell it to use *my* DHCP server, default route, etc. Oh, and set up its
SSID and security. I run DHCP on my desktop for my LAN. Once the router
is set up to work with your LAN, just jack a Cat5 from any of its LAN
ports to your switch.

>
> Best regards
> Kenni
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
>

--
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933 / heller@deepsoft.com
Deepwoods Software -- http://www.deepsoft.com/
() ascii ribbon campaign -- against html e-mail
/ www.asciiribbon.org -- against proprietary attachments



_______________________________________________
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http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 04-24-2011, 06:15 PM
Timothy Murphy
 
Default Attaching LinkSys WRT54GL to CentOS machine

Kenni Lund wrote:

>> I have a LinkSys WRT54GL router,
>> which I would like to attach to my CentOS-5.6 server,
>> to set up a LAN 192.168.2.* .
>> The server is attached to the internet
>> through a Billion modem/router which has a single ethernet outlet.

> Without any information on what the purpose of such a setup would be,
> it's close to impossible to give you any recommendations. Is it
> because you want to use your CentOS system as a firewall? a router? a
> HTTP proxy? a network sniffer?

I don't actually think my motives are relevant.
In case I didn't described the situation clearly,
my CentOS server is connected to an ADSL modem by ethernet (eth0).
The modem's IP address is 192.168.1.254 .

I have a second NIC on my server (eth1)
and I want to attach my LinkSys router to this by ethernet,
to work effectively as an access point
(perhaps that answers your question?)
on a LAN 192.168.2.* .

I'd like to connect my laptop to the system with WiFi,
with an address perhaps of 192.168.2.3 .
The router might have the address 192.168.2.12 .

> Or is it because you only have one external ethernet outlet and you
> want to access the internet on your other systems, while the services
> on your server still can be accessed from the outside? In the last
> case, you would normally just put your server on the LAN and do
> port-forwarding on your router. If it's because you want your server
> to be "outside" of your LAN, a more correct approach would be to setup
> a DMZ zone on your router, dedicate one of the LAN ports as DMZ port
> and connect your server there.

Neither of the above, if I understand you correctly.
I want to connect the router as described above.

The reason, roughly speaking, is that I want all data
that comes into or out of my system to go through the server,
where the traffic can be followed and monitored if necessary.

>> I wonder if anyone has set up a system like this?
>
> Perhaps, perhaps not, depends on what the purpose of the system is.

Do you have a LinkSys router with an IP address other than 192.168.1.1 ,
or even better with an address other than 192.168.1.* ?
If you have, could you tell me _how_ you did it, please.
I don't really care _why_ you did it.

The instructions on the router only explain
how to set it up (with address 192.168.1.1)
attached directly to an ADSL modem.
I could do that, but I don't want to ...


--
Timothy Murphy
e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 04-24-2011, 06:35 PM
Johnny Hughes
 
Default Attaching LinkSys WRT54GL to CentOS machine

On 04/24/2011 01:15 PM, Timothy Murphy wrote:
> Kenni Lund wrote:
>
>>> I have a LinkSys WRT54GL router,
>>> which I would like to attach to my CentOS-5.6 server,
>>> to set up a LAN 192.168.2.* .
>>> The server is attached to the internet
>>> through a Billion modem/router which has a single ethernet outlet.
>
>> Without any information on what the purpose of such a setup would be,
>> it's close to impossible to give you any recommendations. Is it
>> because you want to use your CentOS system as a firewall? a router? a
>> HTTP proxy? a network sniffer?
>
> I don't actually think my motives are relevant.
> In case I didn't described the situation clearly,
> my CentOS server is connected to an ADSL modem by ethernet (eth0).
> The modem's IP address is 192.168.1.254 .
>
> I have a second NIC on my server (eth1)
> and I want to attach my LinkSys router to this by ethernet,
> to work effectively as an access point
> (perhaps that answers your question?)
> on a LAN 192.168.2.* .
>
> I'd like to connect my laptop to the system with WiFi,
> with an address perhaps of 192.168.2.3 .
> The router might have the address 192.168.2.12 .
>
>> Or is it because you only have one external ethernet outlet and you
>> want to access the internet on your other systems, while the services
>> on your server still can be accessed from the outside? In the last
>> case, you would normally just put your server on the LAN and do
>> port-forwarding on your router. If it's because you want your server
>> to be "outside" of your LAN, a more correct approach would be to setup
>> a DMZ zone on your router, dedicate one of the LAN ports as DMZ port
>> and connect your server there.
>
> Neither of the above, if I understand you correctly.
> I want to connect the router as described above.
>
> The reason, roughly speaking, is that I want all data
> that comes into or out of my system to go through the server,
> where the traffic can be followed and monitored if necessary.
>
>>> I wonder if anyone has set up a system like this?
>>
>> Perhaps, perhaps not, depends on what the purpose of the system is.
>
> Do you have a LinkSys router with an IP address other than 192.168.1.1 ,
> or even better with an address other than 192.168.1.* ?
> If you have, could you tell me _how_ you did it, please.
> I don't really care _why_ you did it.
>
> The instructions on the router only explain
> how to set it up (with address 192.168.1.1)
> attached directly to an ADSL modem.
> I could do that, but I don't want to ...
>
>
You basically have 2 choices.

If you connect the router's External port (with IP 192.168.2.x) directly
to eth1 then on the INSIDE of that router you will need to use a 3rd IP
subnet (ie, 192.168.3.x).

The second choice is to connect eth1 of your CentOS machine to an
INTERNAL port on the router (if it has more than one). You can
configure the inside of the router to 192.168.2.x and the external port
of the router would not be connected to anything and the other devices
would connect to the wireless of the router or the other internal ports.


_______________________________________________
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http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 04-24-2011, 07:11 PM
Timothy Murphy
 
Default Attaching LinkSys WRT54GL to CentOS machine

Robert Heller wrote:

> I would guess that the OP just wants a Wireless Access Point. It is
> hard (impossible at retail outlets) to get 'just an Access Point',
> although I think Linksys, et. al. still make just plain Access Points
> these are no longer commonly available at the retail level.
>
> I am using a Netgear 'Wireless Router' as an Access Point. *I* don't
> even have broadband Internet at all (I use dialup). Just leave the WAN
> jack unconnected. Use a machine with a wired network (RJ45) that gets
> its IP address via DHCP and connect this with an Cat5 cable to any of
> the LAN ports on the Router, let it get an address automagically from
> the router and connect to the router via the router's default IP
> address with a web browser. You should then be able to 'login' to the
> admin pages using the default username and password. If you can, you
> can disable the WAN (in the case of the cheap Netgear box, you can't
> and it will bitch and moan about not having internet access to check
> for firmware updates -- I just ignore it). I just disable the router's
> DHCP server, set its IP address to something consistent with my LAN (a
> static IP address in the same subnet, with the proper netmask, etc.),
> tell it to use *my* DHCP server, default route, etc. Oh, and set up its
> SSID and security. I run DHCP on my desktop for my LAN. Once the router
> is set up to work with your LAN, just jack a Cat5 from any of its LAN
> ports to your switch.

That is more or less exactly what I'm hoping to achieve -
except that I would like my server also to be my DHCP server.
But I'll start off with you method, and see how I get on.

--
Timothy Murphy
e-mail: gayleard /at/ eircom.net
tel: +353-86-2336090, +353-1-2842366
s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 04-24-2011, 08:10 PM
Robert Nichols
 
Default Attaching LinkSys WRT54GL to CentOS machine

On 04/24/2011 01:15 PM, Timothy Murphy wrote:
> I don't actually think my motives are relevant.
> In case I didn't described the situation clearly,
> my CentOS server is connected to an ADSL modem by ethernet (eth0).
> The modem's IP address is 192.168.1.254 .
>
> I have a second NIC on my server (eth1)
> and I want to attach my LinkSys router to this by ethernet,
> to work effectively as an access point
> (perhaps that answers your question?)
> on a LAN 192.168.2.* .
>
> I'd like to connect my laptop to the system with WiFi,
> with an address perhaps of 192.168.2.3 .
> The router might have the address 192.168.2.12 .
[SNIP]
> Do you have a LinkSys router with an IP address other than 192.168.1.1 ,
> or even better with an address other than 192.168.1.* ?
> If you have, could you tell me _how_ you did it, please.
> I don't really care _why_ you did it.

I'm doing pretty much exactly what you propose, but I'm using DD-WRT in
place of the standard WRT54GL firmware. That allows me to configure the
WRT54GL as a wireless access point and 6-port switch, with all routing
and server functions performed by the Linux box that serves as a gateway
between my internal network and my cable modem. The router lives at
address 192.168.43.1. Yes, it would probably make more sense to put the
gateway box at the ".1" address and the non-routing "router" at ".2" or
elsewhere, but that's not how my network evolved.

Problem is that I don't have a WRT54 with standard firmware, so it's
hard to give instructions. As others have said, you would need to use
only the LAN ports on the router. Configure the router not to use DHCP
for its WAN connection and then you should be able to set up its local
IP address, subnet mask, and other network parameters manually. It's
hard to imagine a router that wouldn't let you do that. Yes, when the
router boots with its factory default settings it will be using
192.168.1.1, but you can temporarily configure your network interface
to talk on that subnet, log into the router, and configure it to your
liking.

--
Bob Nichols "NOSPAM" is really part of my email address.
Do NOT delete it.

_______________________________________________
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Old 04-24-2011, 08:43 PM
Robert Heller
 
Default Attaching LinkSys WRT54GL to CentOS machine

At Sun, 24 Apr 2011 21:11:31 +0200 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
> Robert Heller wrote:
>
> > I would guess that the OP just wants a Wireless Access Point. It is
> > hard (impossible at retail outlets) to get 'just an Access Point',
> > although I think Linksys, et. al. still make just plain Access Points
> > these are no longer commonly available at the retail level.
> >
> > I am using a Netgear 'Wireless Router' as an Access Point. *I* don't
> > even have broadband Internet at all (I use dialup). Just leave the WAN
> > jack unconnected. Use a machine with a wired network (RJ45) that gets
> > its IP address via DHCP and connect this with an Cat5 cable to any of
> > the LAN ports on the Router, let it get an address automagically from
> > the router and connect to the router via the router's default IP
> > address with a web browser. You should then be able to 'login' to the
> > admin pages using the default username and password. If you can, you
> > can disable the WAN (in the case of the cheap Netgear box, you can't
> > and it will bitch and moan about not having internet access to check
> > for firmware updates -- I just ignore it). I just disable the router's
> > DHCP server, set its IP address to something consistent with my LAN (a
> > static IP address in the same subnet, with the proper netmask, etc.),
> > tell it to use *my* DHCP server, default route, etc. Oh, and set up its
> > SSID and security. I run DHCP on my desktop for my LAN. Once the router
> > is set up to work with your LAN, just jack a Cat5 from any of its LAN
> > ports to your switch.
>
> That is more or less exactly what I'm hoping to achieve -
> except that I would like my server also to be my DHCP server.
> But I'll start off with you method, and see how I get on.

I use my 'desktop' as a DHCP server (amoungst other things) in addition
to being my desktop.

>

--
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933 / heller@deepsoft.com
Deepwoods Software -- http://www.deepsoft.com/
() ascii ribbon campaign -- against html e-mail
/ www.asciiribbon.org -- against proprietary attachments



_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
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http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 04-24-2011, 11:10 PM
Anthony
 
Default Attaching LinkSys WRT54GL to CentOS machine

On 25/04/11 04:15, Timothy Murphy wrote:
> Do you have a LinkSys router with an IP address other than 192.168.1.1 ,
> or even better with an address other than 192.168.1.* ?
> If you have, could you tell me _how_ you did it, please.
> I don't really care _why_ you did it.
>
> The instructions on the router only explain
> how to set it up (with address 192.168.1.1)
> attached directly to an ADSL modem.
> I could do that, but I don't want to ...
>

The reason you might want to stick with the 192.168.1.* IP address is
because when you have a need to reset to factory defaults, you'll find
it takes some extra steps to reconnect to it (can be done by adding a
slave IP address to the NIC attached to your AP; ip addr add
192.168.1.x/24 dev ethx) to reconfigure. In my case, I simply changed
my internal network to suit the Linksys and never looked back.

I have my set up as follows:

(Pardon my ASCII art if it fails to render properly once I hit send)

------------ ----------------- ---------------- -----------------
| Internet |----| 5-port switch |----| CentOS 5 Box |----| 8-port switch |
------------ ----------------- ---------------- -----------------
|
V
<<<----------------------------------------------------<<<
|
V ----------------
>>>--|Linksys WRT54G|
----------------

My internal devices (192.168.1.x/24) are attached to the 8-port switch.
I use only 2-ports on the 5 port switch to connect the ADSL modem to the
server. All DHCP, DNS, Firewalling, is done on the CentOS box. I know
most will cringe on the next few words, but I happen to like the way it
is setup. On the ADSL modem, I've set the CentOS box as the DMZ so that
I can control all Nating on the server. It has not failed me for the
last 6 years I've been doing this. The key is to have a deny,allow
firewall policy - meaning the policy on all chains is DROP, then I
puunch the holes I need.

Hopefully not too much verbiage.

Cheers,
Ak.

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Old 04-24-2011, 11:21 PM
John R Pierce
 
Default Attaching LinkSys WRT54GL to CentOS machine

On 04/24/11 11:15 AM, Timothy Murphy wrote:
>> > Without any information on what the purpose of such a setup would be,
>> > it's close to impossible to give you any recommendations. Is it
>> > because you want to use your CentOS system as a firewall? a router? a
>> > HTTP proxy? a network sniffer?
> I don't actually think my motives are relevant.
> In case I didn't described the situation clearly,
> my CentOS server is connected to an ADSL modem by ethernet (eth0).
> The modem's IP address is 192.168.1.254 .

your goal is very relevant if youj are expecting us to suggest a
workable solution.

but ouch, sounds like your modem is ALSO a NAT router, and is probably
running DHCP already. what IP is eth0 of this linux PC ?

you want to avoid 'double nat' where there's multiple layers of address
translation as its just ugly as heck to troubleshoot, and adds
complexity without any additional value..

assuming I'm right, and your modem is in fact doing NAT routing too,
then I'd put DD-WRT or Tomato opensource firmware on the WRT54GL,
configure it for LAN only use, so all 5 ports are LAN, plug it into the
modem, plug your computer(s) into the WRT's switch also, and configure
the WRT"s wireless. now all your systems will be on that 192.168.1.xxx
subnet.
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