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Old 02-06-2011, 08:35 PM
Buz Davis
 
Default system clock

I am running CntOS 5 with Gnome. Every now and then I have noticed
that the computer will somehow get the time wrong by several hours. Is
there a simple way to adjust the time? So far the only way I have found
is to boot into windows (it is a dual boot system), make the change
there, and then get back into CentOS. Older versions of Red Hat and
Fedora let you do it by right-clicking on the time display, if I recall
correctly, but setting the time isn't one of the options in CentOS.

Thanks

Buz Davis
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Old 02-06-2011, 08:49 PM
Keith Roberts
 
Default system clock

On Sun, 6 Feb 2011, Buz Davis wrote:

> To: centos@centos.org
> From: Buz Davis <buzdavis@earthlink.net>
> Subject: [CentOS] system clock
>
> I am running CntOS 5 with Gnome. Every now and then I have noticed
> that the computer will somehow get the time wrong by several hours. Is
> there a simple way to adjust the time? So far the only way I have found
> is to boot into windows (it is a dual boot system), make the change
> there, and then get back into CentOS. Older versions of Red Hat and
> Fedora let you do it by right-clicking on the time display, if I recall
> correctly, but setting the time isn't one of the options in CentOS.

If you are connecting to the internet, you can use a program
called ntpd:

Name : ntp
Arch : i386
Version : 4.2.2p1
Release : 9.el5.centos.2.1
Size : 2.4 M
Repo : installed
Summary : Synchronizes system time using the Network Time
Protocol (NTP).
URL : http://www.ntp.org
License : distributable
Description: The Network Time Protocol (NTP) is used to
synchronize a
: computer's time with another reference time
source. The ntp
: package contains utilities and daemons that
will synchronize
: your computer's time to Coordinated Universal
Time (UTC) via
: the NTP protocol and NTP servers. The ntp
package includes
: ntpdate (a program for retrieving the date and
time from remote
: machines via a network) and ntpd (a daemon
which continuously
: adjusts system time).
:
: Install the ntp package if you need tools for
keeping your
: system's time synchronized via the NTP
protocol.

HTH

Keith Roberts

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Old 02-06-2011, 08:57 PM
Benjamin Franz
 
Default system clock

On 02/06/2011 01:35 PM, Buz Davis wrote:
> I am running CntOS 5 with Gnome. Every now and then I have noticed
> that the computer will somehow get the time wrong by several hours. Is
> there a simple way to adjust the time? So far the only way I have found
> is to boot into windows (it is a dual boot system), make the change
> there, and then get back into CentOS.

[...]

CentOS likes to store the hardware system clock in GMT time. Windows
likes to store it in the local time zone. The multi-hour switch is an
artifact of dual booting with this disparity in play. If either system
updates the hardware clock while running, the other OS will get thrown
off by several hours.

The fastest way to 'resync' the clock is using the ntpdate utiltity. It
is part of the 'ntp' package. As root run: 'yum install ntp'. You can
then reset the clock in CentOS by running 'ntpdate' as root.

--
Benjamin Franz
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Old 02-06-2011, 09:11 PM
Benjamin Donnachie
 
Default system clock

On 6 Feb 2011, at 21:40, Buz Davis <buzdavis@earthlink.net> wrote:

> Is there a simple way to adjust the time?

Easy way - use the 'date' command, see http://linux.die.net/man/1/date

Ben
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Old 02-06-2011, 09:33 PM
Keith Roberts
 
Default system clock

On Sun, 6 Feb 2011, Benjamin Donnachie wrote:

> To: CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org>
> From: Benjamin Donnachie <benjamin@py-soft.co.uk>
> Subject: Re: [CentOS] system clock
>
> On 6 Feb 2011, at 21:40, Buz Davis <buzdavis@earthlink.net> wrote:
>
>> Is there a simple way to adjust the time?
>
> Easy way - use the 'date' command, see http://linux.die.net/man/1/date

Could do Ben. But the idea of ntp is that it does it for
you automatically, without having to intervene yourself and
set the time manually

Kind Regards,

Keith Roberts

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