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Old 01-26-2011, 05:01 AM
Always Learning
 
Default Recommendation for a Linux alternative to Centos - ATH9K disaster

On Tue, 2011-01-25 at 14:49 -0500, m.roth@5-cent.us wrote:

> Benjamin Smith wrote:
>
> > On my hard disk, I have my /home, /boot, and / directories each on their
> > own partitions, and when I'm upgrading my Fedora, I just format / and
> /boot,
> > and leave /home alone. Although I've transfered it a few times between hard


> Yep. ALWAYS have /home on its own partition. You *might* want /opt on its
> own, also. For more on my views on this, here's my copy of the article I
> had published a few years ago in SysAdmin (now defunct, unfortunately)
> <http://24.5-cent.us/upgrading_linux.doc>

Thanks for the good advice. I wondered why the installer gave those
choices. Now it makes sense. All my production data resides on /data
and I tend to leave the standard directories alone but I did create
a /root/bin and put in it simple commands like

.l
# /bin/bash
ls -al

.f
# /bin/bash
find / -iwholename *$1

.fs
# /bin/bash
find /data -iwholename *$1
find /ax -iwholename *$1
find /bx -iwholename *$1
find /cx -iwholename *$1

Obviously with the chmod +x. The last one makes searching times much
faster when seeking non-operating system files.

Because I'm lazy or perhaps because I firmly believe the computer should
do the work for the people not vice versa, I did some links (ln -s) for
service and some copies of ipt tables etc. so I can quickly type

sv ipt status

ipt -I .....

ipt -nvL

Command lines are like what computers used to be like. You know with a
fast but noisy Teletype banging-out text at 75 baud or a luxury terminal
running at a staggeringly fast 300 baud giving a top speed of 30
characters a second.

--

With best regards,

Paul.
England,
EU.


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Old 01-26-2011, 06:44 AM
"Les Bell"
 
Default Recommendation for a Linux alternative to Centos - ATH9K disaster

Always Learning <centos@g7.u22.net> wrote:

>>
Thanks for the good advice. I wondered why the installer gave those
choices. Now it makes sense. All my production data resides on /data
and I tend to leave the standard directories alone
<<

Paul, if you want a basic explanation of the rationale behind the Linux
Filesystem Hierarchy Standard, you might enjoy this article from a course I
wrote years ago - it's a little dated, but still applicable today.

http://www.lesbell.com.au/Home.nsf/web/What+Goes+Where+on+a+Linux+System?OpenDocument

Best,

--- Les Bell
[http://www.lesbell.com.au]
Tel: +61 2 9451 1144


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Old 01-26-2011, 06:58 AM
"Sorin Srbu"
 
Default Recommendation for a Linux alternative to Centos - ATH9K disaster

>-----Original Message-----
>From: centos-bounces@centos.org [mailto:centos-bounces@centos.org] On
>Behalf Of Brian Mathis
>Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 7:03 PM
>To: CentOS mailing list
>Subject: Re: [CentOS] Recommendation for a Linux alternative to Centos -
>ATH9K disaster
>
>CentOS is great for servers, but absolutely not for a new person
>you're trying to get to try Linux. This approach actually hurts Linux
>since people think "oh I tried Linux and it sucked".

My 50+-year-old and technically very unsavvy mother manages CentOS just fine
on her computer. The trick is to use the Redmond theme...
--
/Sorin
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Old 01-27-2011, 04:22 AM
Always Learning
 
Default Recommendation for a Linux alternative to Centos - ATH9K disaster

On Wed, 2011-01-26 at 09:58 -0500, Brian Mathis wrote:

> You may not be aware of the "locate" command? Nightly there is a job
> that runs (updatedb) that scans the disk and saves file locations.
> Locate searches this database instead of you have to do a 'find'. The
> only thing it won't get are files that were added since the last
> 'updatedb' run. You can run that whenever you want to update the db,
> or use find in those cases.

Thanks for the explanation. Now I know why locate never usually worked
for me - it hadn't updated.

find is fast, especially when I restrict the search paths.

--

With best regards,

Paul.
England,
EU.


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Old 01-28-2011, 02:25 PM
Always Learning
 
Default Recommendation for a Linux alternative to Centos - ATH9K disaster

On Fri, 2011-01-28 at 14:50 +0000, John Hodrien wrote:

> All configurable via /etc/updatedb.conf if your local needs differ.

How does one remove it ?

yum erase updated ?

It is not present in any CRON.

--

With best regards,

Paul.
England,
EU.


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Old 01-28-2011, 02:36 PM
Nicolas Thierry-Mieg
 
Default Recommendation for a Linux alternative to Centos - ATH9K disaster

Always Learning wrote:
>
> On Fri, 2011-01-28 at 14:50 +0000, John Hodrien wrote:
>
>> All configurable via /etc/updatedb.conf if your local needs differ.
>
> How does one remove it ?
>
> yum erase updated ?
>
> It is not present in any CRON.

yes it is: /etc/cron.daily/mlocate.cron
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Old 01-28-2011, 02:40 PM
Todd Denniston
 
Default Recommendation for a Linux alternative to Centos - ATH9K disaster

Always Learning wrote, On 01/28/2011 10:25 AM:
> On Fri, 2011-01-28 at 14:50 +0000, John Hodrien wrote:
>
>> All configurable via /etc/updatedb.conf if your local needs differ.
>
> How does one remove it ?
>
> yum erase updated ?
>
> It is not present in any CRON.
>

There is a new cron in town. It's name is anacron, and it runs beside|[in addition to] the old
cron but with different config files. anacron has some neat features such as, if your box has been
of for several days, then ~1 hour after it powers up any missed jobs get ran.

/etc/cron.daily/mlocate.cron
/etc/anacrontab
/etc/updatedb.conf

ls /etc/cron.*


--
Todd Denniston
Crane Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC Crane)
Harnessing the Power of Technology for the Warfighter
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