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Old 12-05-2010, 05:40 PM
Ron Loftin
 
Default ntfs

On Sun, 2010-12-05 at 23:52 +0530, Ritika Garg wrote:
> CentOS 5.5 is installed in the system. I installed the package
> kmod-ntfs-2.1.27-3.el5.elrepo.x86_64.rpm
> I mounted Seagate external hard disk. I am able to copy contents from
> the hard disk to the system but not from the system to the hard disk.

Yes. If you go to this page on the ElRepo site:

http://elrepo.org/tiki/kmod-ntfs

and check the limitations you will see that this is the expected
behavior.

If you want full write capabilities with NTFS I suggest that you remove
kmod-ntfs and instead use the fuse-ntfs-3g package from RPMForge. That
relies on DKMS ( which works well enough for me ) and has full
read-write capabilities.

> _______________________________________________
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> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
--
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"God, root, what is difference ?" Piter from UserFriendly

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Old 12-05-2010, 05:40 PM
Nico Kadel-Garcia
 
Default ntfs

On Sun, Dec 5, 2010 at 1:22 PM, Ritika Garg <ritikagarg25@gmail.com> wrote:
> CentOS 5.5 is installed in the system. I installed the package
> kmod-ntfs-2.1.27-3.el5.elrepo.x86_64.rpm
> I mounted Seagate external hard disk. I am able to copy contents from the
> hard disk to the system but not from the system to the hard disk.

Do you also need the centosplus kernel, which has the NTFS features
enabled in the linux kernel ".config" file at compilation time?

>
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
>
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Old 12-05-2010, 05:53 PM
Ron Loftin
 
Default ntfs

On Sun, 2010-12-05 at 13:40 -0500, Nico Kadel-Garcia wrote:
> On Sun, Dec 5, 2010 at 1:22 PM, Ritika Garg <ritikagarg25@gmail.com> wrote:
> > CentOS 5.5 is installed in the system. I installed the package
> > kmod-ntfs-2.1.27-3.el5.elrepo.x86_64.rpm
> > I mounted Seagate external hard disk. I am able to copy contents from the
> > hard disk to the system but not from the system to the hard disk.
>
> Do you also need the centosplus kernel, which has the NTFS features
> enabled in the linux kernel ".config" file at compilation time?

Not for fuse-ntfs-3g. If you install the RPMForge repo, yum will do the
rest, and it all plays very nicely with the CentOS standard kernels.

>
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > CentOS mailing list
> > CentOS@centos.org
> > http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
> >
> >
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
--
Ron Loftin reloftin@twcny.rr.com

"God, root, what is difference ?" Piter from UserFriendly

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Old 12-05-2010, 07:54 PM
RedShift
 
Default ntfs

On 12/05/10 19:22, Ritika Garg wrote:
> CentOS 5.5 is installed in the system. I installed the package kmod-ntfs-2.1.27-3.el5.elrepo.x86_64.rpm
> I mounted Seagate external hard disk. I am able to copy contents from the hard disk to the system but not from the system to the hard disk.
>
>
>

The ntfs kernel module can only read. If you want write support, use ntfs-3g. It is included in rpmforge.
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Old 12-05-2010, 08:13 PM
Akemi Yagi
 
Default ntfs

On Sun, Dec 5, 2010 at 10:40 AM, Nico Kadel-Garcia <nkadel@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sun, Dec 5, 2010 at 1:22 PM, Ritika Garg <ritikagarg25@gmail.com> wrote:
>> CentOS 5.5 is installed in the system. I installed the package
>> kmod-ntfs-2.1.27-3.el5.elrepo.x86_64.rpm
>> I mounted Seagate external hard disk. I am able to copy contents from the
>> hard disk to the system but not from the system to the hard disk.
>
> Do you also need the centosplus kernel, which has the NTFS features
> enabled in the linux kernel ".config" file at compilation time?

Just for the record. The centosplus kernel does not have NTFS turned
on. There is a bug in the NTFS code but the upstream vendor would not
fix it because it is not enabled in their kernel:

https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=481495

Therefore it was decided not to enable it in the cplus kernel.
Besides, as already pointed out in this thread, ntfs-3g is better than
the kernel ntfs module functionally and it is actively maintained.

Akemi
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Old 12-05-2010, 08:29 PM
Niki Kovacs
 
Default ntfs

Ritika Garg a écrit :
> CentOS 5.5 is installed in the system. I installed the package
> kmod-ntfs-2.1.27-3.el5.elrepo.x86_64.rpm
> I mounted Seagate external hard disk. I am able to copy contents from
> the hard disk to the system but not from the system to the hard disk.
>

I've been following this thread, and I'm wondering: why bother with NTFS
in the first place? If you have a mixed environment where you need
Windows to access your external hard disk, you might as well format it
with a FAT filesystem. Linux supports FAT natively, without making you
jump through burning loops.

If you don't know how to achieve this, here's how :

1) Backup all your data.

2) Given your external disk is /dev/sda, launch fdisk, delete the NTFS
partition and create a single FAT partition (hex code 0b).

3) Install 'dosfstools' and format your disk :

# mkfs.vfat /dev/sda1

4) From now on, mount your disk as FAT :

# mount [-t vfat] /dev/sda1 /mnt/disk

Cheers,

Niki Kovacs
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Old 12-05-2010, 08:34 PM
Barry Brimer
 
Default ntfs

> I've been following this thread, and I'm wondering: why bother with NTFS
> in the first place? If you have a mixed environment where you need
> Windows to access your external hard disk, you might as well format it
> with a FAT filesystem. Linux supports FAT natively, without making you
> jump through burning loops.

There could be many reasons why ntfs support is needed, such as reading a
disk that is not your own. Also, keep in mind that FAT has a 4 GB file
size limit.
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Old 12-05-2010, 08:49 PM
Nico Kadel-Garcia
 
Default ntfs

On Sun, Dec 5, 2010 at 4:29 PM, Niki Kovacs <contact@kikinovak.net> wrote:
> Ritika Garg a écrit :
>> CentOS 5.5 is installed in the system. I installed the package
>> kmod-ntfs-2.1.27-3.el5.elrepo.x86_64.rpm
>> I mounted Seagate external hard disk. I am able to copy contents from
>> the hard disk to the system but not from the system to the hard disk.
>>
>
> I've been following this thread, and I'm wondering: why bother with NTFS
> in the first place? If you have a mixed environment where you need
> Windows to access your external hard disk, you might as well format it
> with a FAT filesystem. Linux supports FAT natively, without making you
> jump through burning loops.

External USB drives, USB sticks, and iSCSI devices. USB sticks, in
particular, are often pre-formatted with NTFS.
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Old 12-05-2010, 09:13 PM
Robert Heller
 
Default ntfs

At Sun, 05 Dec 2010 22:29:47 +0100 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
> Ritika Garg a écrit :
> > CentOS 5.5 is installed in the system. I installed the package
> > kmod-ntfs-2.1.27-3.el5.elrepo.x86_64.rpm
> > I mounted Seagate external hard disk. I am able to copy contents from
> > the hard disk to the system but not from the system to the hard disk.
> >
>
> I've been following this thread, and I'm wondering: why bother with NTFS
> in the first place? If you have a mixed environment where you need
> Windows to access your external hard disk, you might as well format it
> with a FAT filesystem. Linux supports FAT natively, without making you
> jump through burning loops.
>
> If you don't know how to achieve this, here's how :
>
> 1) Backup all your data.
>
> 2) Given your external disk is /dev/sda, launch fdisk, delete the NTFS
> partition and create a single FAT partition (hex code 0b).
>
> 3) Install 'dosfstools' and format your disk :
>
> # mkfs.vfat /dev/sda1
>
> 4) From now on, mount your disk as FAT :
>
> # mount [-t vfat] /dev/sda1 /mnt/disk
>
> Cheers,
>
> Niki Kovacs

Will FAT support the larger external disks, such as the .5TB and larger?

> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
>

--
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933 / heller@deepsoft.com
Deepwoods Software -- http://www.deepsoft.com/
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/ www.asciiribbon.org -- against proprietary attachments



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Old 12-06-2010, 05:25 AM
Niki Kovacs
 
Default ntfs

Robert Heller a écrit :
>
> Will FAT support the larger external disks, such as the .5TB and larger?
>

I read the replies to my previous posts, and I get your point, since I
didn't know about the various limitations. It's probably due to the fact
that we're 100% GNU/Linux here. I haven't booted Windows for work since
before the time Windows XP came out (around 2001). The only time I get
to "work" on Windows is usually to retrieve data before moving it to
CentOS. As far as external hard disks are concerned, they're all ext3
here. Whenever the odd non-Linux user has to exchange data with Linux
here, he or she has to use a Samba share.

So I admit my point of view is somewhat biased )

Cheers,

Niki
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