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Johan Scheepers 11-25-2010 05:45 PM

Add application to start at booting
 
Good day,

Please, How/where can I add an application to start at boot up.
Don't seem to find it in options available

Thanks
Johan

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John R Pierce 11-25-2010 05:55 PM

Add application to start at booting
 
On 11/25/10 10:45 AM, Johan Scheepers wrote:
> Good day,
>
> Please, How/where can I add an application to start at boot up.
> Don't seem to find it in options available

at 'boot up', the only things that start are service daemons, as invoked
from the /etc/rc.d/* stuff. these service daemons do not have a
console. at user login time, when your desktop is created, the
.profile or .bash_profile scripts in your home directory are invoked,
and anything you want running on your desktop could be started there.


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Barry Brimer 11-25-2010 06:16 PM

Add application to start at booting
 
> Please, How/where can I add an application to start at boot up.
> Don't seem to find it in options available

Again, I assume you are using GNOME under CentOS 5

System -> Preferences -> More Preferences -> Sessions -> Startup Programs
-> Add

Barry
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Johan Scheepers 11-25-2010 06:25 PM

Add application to start at booting
 
Barry Brimer wrote:
>> Please, How/where can I add an application to start at boot up.
>> Don't seem to find it in options available
>>
>
> Again, I assume you are using GNOME under CentOS 5
>
> System -> Preferences -> More Preferences -> Sessions -> Startup Programs
> -> Add
>
> Barry
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
Thanks. Easy. Did not look deep enough.
Johan
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11-25-2010 06:25 PM

Add application to start at booting
 
This was recently answered in another thread

<Quote>

Re: [CentOS] best way to start and shutdown programs in CentOS?

On 24 November 2010 14:20, killscript <killscript@gmail.com> wrote:
> Les Mikesell wrote:
>> The RedHat/Centos way of doing things is to have init scripts in
>> /etc/rc.d/init.d that take at least start, stop, and restart as arguments for
>> each program that should start automatically. *Then for the runlevels where you
>> want them to start you have a symlink where the name starts with S and the rest
>> is a number to make it sort alphabetically into the order that things should
>> start in /etc/rc?.d (where the ? is the runlevel). *Likewise add links starting
>> with 'K' in the levels where the process should be stopped. * *There is a
>> convention for comments in the scripts so that 'checkconfig program on' can make
>> the links for you. *Look through some of the other scripts to see how they work.
>
> Sorry for the stupid question here, but does the /etc/initd./scriptname
> file "know" about these symlinks because of a particular comment in there?
Copied from the man file for chkconfig:

RUNLEVEL FILES
Each service which should be manageable by chkconfig needs two
or more commented lines added to its init.d script. The first
line tells chkconfig what runlevels the service should be
started in by default, as well as the start and stop priority levels.
If the service should not, by default, be started in any
runlevels, a - should be used in place of the runlevels list. The
sec-
ond line contains a description for the service, and may be
extended across multiple lines with backslash continuation.

For example, random.init has these three lines:
# chkconfig: 2345 20 80
# description: Saves and restores system entropy pool for
# higher quality random number generation.
This says that the random script should be started in levels
2, 3, 4, and 5, that its start priority should be 20, and that its
stop priority should be 80. You should be able to figure out
what the description says; the causes the line to be continued.
The extra space in front of the line is ignored.

Basically, create your file by taking one of the files as a sample and
place it in /etc/init.d.
For example, I've copied /etc/init.d/vncserver to /etc/init.d/sample and ran
[root@hakan init.d]# chkconfig --add sample
[root@hakan init.d]# chkconfig --list|grep sample
sample 0:off 1:off 2:off 3:off 4:off 5:off 6:off

Now my sample is there but won't run at all but it's all there.
[root@hakan init.d]# chkconfig sample on
[root@hakan init.d]# chkconfig --list|grep sample
sample 0:off 1:off 2:on 3:on 4:on 5:on 6:off

Now it's on for all of the levels in the comment included in the file.
Nevertheless, I could have overriden that with the ckconfig --level
<levels> <name> on command options to run on other levels.

[root@hakan etc]# find rc* -iname *sample*|sort
rc.d/init.d/sample
rc.d/rc0.d/K35sample
rc.d/rc1.d/K35sample
rc.d/rc2.d/S91sample
rc.d/rc3.d/S91sample
rc.d/rc4.d/S91sample
rc.d/rc5.d/S91sample
rc.d/rc6.d/K35sample

and the file comment looks like below which matches the above, startup
priority is 91, kill priority is 35. It will run on all normal levels
since it's not defined, excluding 1 (single user), 0 (shutdown) and 6
(reboot).

# chkconfig: - 91 35

I better remove this sample from my startup :)
--
Hakan (m1fcj) - http://www.hititgunesi.org
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------Original Message------
From: Johan Scheepers
Sender: centos-bounces@centos.org
To: centos
ReplyTo: CentOS mailing list
Subject: [CentOS] Add application to start at booting
Sent: Nov 25, 2010 10:45 AM

Good day,

Please, How/where can I add an application to start at boot up.
Don't seem to find it in options available

Thanks
Johan

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CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos


Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
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Johan Scheepers 11-25-2010 06:32 PM

Add application to start at booting
 
sheraznaz@yahoo.com wrote:
> This was recently answered in another thread
>
> <Quote>
>
> Re: [CentOS] best way to start and shutdown programs in CentOS?
>
> On 24 November 2010 14:20, killscript <killscript@gmail.com> wrote:
>> Les Mikesell wrote:
>>> The RedHat/Centos way of doing things is to have init scripts in
>>> /etc/rc.d/init.d that take at least start, stop, and restart as arguments for
>>> each program that should start automatically. Then for the runlevels where you
>>> want them to start you have a symlink where the name starts with S and the rest
>>> is a number to make it sort alphabetically into the order that things should
>>> start in /etc/rc?.d (where the ? is the runlevel). Likewise add links starting
>>> with 'K' in the levels where the process should be stopped. There is a
>>> convention for comments in the scripts so that 'checkconfig program on' can make
>>> the links for you. Look through some of the other scripts to see how they work.
>> Sorry for the stupid question here, but does the /etc/initd./scriptname
>> file "know" about these symlinks because of a particular comment in there?
> Copied from the man file for chkconfig:
>
> RUNLEVEL FILES
> Each service which should be manageable by chkconfig needs two
> or more commented lines added to its init.d script. The first
> line tells chkconfig what runlevels the service should be
> started in by default, as well as the start and stop priority levels.
> If the service should not, by default, be started in any
> runlevels, a - should be used in place of the runlevels list. The
> sec-
> ond line contains a description for the service, and may be
> extended across multiple lines with backslash continuation.
>
> For example, random.init has these three lines:
> # chkconfig: 2345 20 80
> # description: Saves and restores system entropy pool for
> # higher quality random number generation.
> This says that the random script should be started in levels
> 2, 3, 4, and 5, that its start priority should be 20, and that its
> stop priority should be 80. You should be able to figure out
> what the description says; the causes the line to be continued.
> The extra space in front of the line is ignored.
>
> Basically, create your file by taking one of the files as a sample and
> place it in /etc/init.d.
> For example, I've copied /etc/init.d/vncserver to /etc/init.d/sample and ran
> [root@hakan init.d]# chkconfig --add sample
> [root@hakan init.d]# chkconfig --list|grep sample
> sample 0:off 1:off 2:off 3:off 4:off 5:off 6:off
>
> Now my sample is there but won't run at all but it's all there.
> [root@hakan init.d]# chkconfig sample on
> [root@hakan init.d]# chkconfig --list|grep sample
> sample 0:off 1:off 2:on 3:on 4:on 5:on 6:off
>
> Now it's on for all of the levels in the comment included in the file.
> Nevertheless, I could have overriden that with the ckconfig --level
> <levels> <name> on command options to run on other levels.
>
> [root@hakan etc]# find rc* -iname *sample*|sort
> rc.d/init.d/sample
> rc.d/rc0.d/K35sample
> rc.d/rc1.d/K35sample
> rc.d/rc2.d/S91sample
> rc.d/rc3.d/S91sample
> rc.d/rc4.d/S91sample
> rc.d/rc5.d/S91sample
> rc.d/rc6.d/K35sample
>
> and the file comment looks like below which matches the above, startup
> priority is 91, kill priority is 35. It will run on all normal levels
> since it's not defined, excluding 1 (single user), 0 (shutdown) and 6
> (reboot).
>
> # chkconfig: - 91 35
>
> I better remove this sample from my startup :)

What I was looking for is this..

System -> Preferences -> More Preferences -> Sessions -> Startup
Programs -> Add

Thanks
Johan
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Les Mikesell 11-26-2010 03:45 AM

Add application to start at booting
 
On 11/25/2010 1:32 PM, Johan Scheepers wrote:

>
> What I was looking for is this..
>
> System -> Preferences -> More Preferences -> Sessions -> Startup
> Programs -> Add

Doesn't that start at login rather than boot time?

----
Les Mikesell
lesmikesell@gmail.com
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Keith Roberts 11-26-2010 03:19 PM

Add application to start at booting
 
On Thu, 25 Nov 2010, Les Mikesell wrote:

> To: centos@centos.org
> From: Les Mikesell <lesmikesell@gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [CentOS] Add application to start at booting
>
> On 11/25/2010 1:32 PM, Johan Scheepers wrote:
>
>>
>> What I was looking for is this..
>>
>> System -> Preferences -> More Preferences -> Sessions -> Startup
>> Programs -> Add
>
> Doesn't that start at login rather than boot time?

Try /etc/rc.d/rc.local

Keith

--
In theory, theory and practice are the same;
in practice they are not.

This email was sent from my laptop with Centos 5.5
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