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Roberto Nunnari 11-18-2010 05:11 PM

kickstart raid disk partitioning
 
Hello.

A couple of years ago I installed two file-servers
using kickstart. The server has two 1TB sata disks
with two software raid1 partitions as follows:

# cat /proc/mdstat
Personalities : [raid1]
md1 : active raid1 sdb4[1] sda4[0]
933448704 blocks [2/2] [UU]
md0 : active raid1 sdb1[1] sda2[2](F)
40957568 blocks [2/1] [_U]


Now the drives are starting to be failing and next week I'll
backup /homes, reinstall OS with kickstart, and finally
restore /homes.

There's a problem with how the kickstart process partitions
the disks, though. As you may have noticed above, md0 is made
up of sdb1 and sda2.

Could anybody help me understand how to make the partitions
on the two drives identical still using kickstart?

Here's the relevant part from the kickstart file:

zerombr yes
clearpart --all --initlabel
bootloader --location=mbr
part /boot --fstype ext3 --size 250 --asprimary --ondisk sda
part swap --size 2048 --asprimary --ondisk sda
part raid.01 --size 40000 --asprimary --ondisk sda
part raid.03 --size 1 --grow --asprimary --ondisk sda
part /boot2 --fstype ext3 --size 250 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
part swap --size 2048 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
part raid.02 --size 40000 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
part raid.04 --size 1 --grow --asprimary --ondisk sdb
raid / --level=1 --device=md0 --fstype ext3 raid.01 raid.02
raid /home --level=1 --device=md1 --fstype ext3 raid.03 raid.04

..but here's the produced partitioning on the two drives:

# parted /dev/sda print
Disk geometry for /dev/sda: 0.000-953869.710 megabytes
Disk label type: msdos
Minor Start End Type Filesystem Flags
1 0.031 251.015 primary ext3 boot
2 251.016 40248.786 primary ext3 raid
3 40248.787 42296.132 primary linux-swap
4 42296.133 953867.219 primary ext3 raid

# parted /dev/sdb print
Disk geometry for /dev/sdb: 0.000-953869.710 megabytes
Disk label type: msdos
Minor Start End Type Filesystem Flags
1 0.031 39997.771 primary ext3 boot, raid
2 39997.771 42045.117 primary linux-swap
3 42045.117 42296.132 primary ext3
4 42296.133 953867.219 primary ext3 raid


I'm not asking because I'm picky, but just because, it would
have made my life easier to fix bad blocks on disks by
dd from good block on disk1 to bad block on disk2, and as
next week I'll reinstall, I'd prefer to do it the right way.

Some more bits about my environment:

# cat /etc/redhat-release
CentOS release 4.8 (Final)

# uname -rms
Linux 2.6.9-89.0.18.ELsmp i686

Thank you and best regards.
Robi
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos

Digimer 11-18-2010 06:21 PM

kickstart raid disk partitioning
 
On 11/18/2010 01:11 PM, Roberto Nunnari wrote:
> Hello.
>
> A couple of years ago I installed two file-servers
> using kickstart. The server has two 1TB sata disks
> with two software raid1 partitions as follows:
>
> # cat /proc/mdstat
> Personalities : [raid1]
> md1 : active raid1 sdb4[1] sda4[0]
> 933448704 blocks [2/2] [UU]
> md0 : active raid1 sdb1[1] sda2[2](F)
> 40957568 blocks [2/1] [_U]
>
>
> Now the drives are starting to be failing and next week I'll
> backup /homes, reinstall OS with kickstart, and finally
> restore /homes.
>
> There's a problem with how the kickstart process partitions
> the disks, though. As you may have noticed above, md0 is made
> up of sdb1 and sda2.
>
> Could anybody help me understand how to make the partitions
> on the two drives identical still using kickstart?
>
> Here's the relevant part from the kickstart file:
>
> zerombr yes
> clearpart --all --initlabel
> bootloader --location=mbr
> part /boot --fstype ext3 --size 250 --asprimary --ondisk sda
> part swap --size 2048 --asprimary --ondisk sda
> part raid.01 --size 40000 --asprimary --ondisk sda
> part raid.03 --size 1 --grow --asprimary --ondisk sda
> part /boot2 --fstype ext3 --size 250 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
> part swap --size 2048 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
> part raid.02 --size 40000 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
> part raid.04 --size 1 --grow --asprimary --ondisk sdb
> raid / --level=1 --device=md0 --fstype ext3 raid.01 raid.02
> raid /home --level=1 --device=md1 --fstype ext3 raid.03 raid.04
>
> ..but here's the produced partitioning on the two drives:
>
> # parted /dev/sda print
> Disk geometry for /dev/sda: 0.000-953869.710 megabytes
> Disk label type: msdos
> Minor Start End Type Filesystem Flags
> 1 0.031 251.015 primary ext3 boot
> 2 251.016 40248.786 primary ext3 raid
> 3 40248.787 42296.132 primary linux-swap
> 4 42296.133 953867.219 primary ext3 raid
>
> # parted /dev/sdb print
> Disk geometry for /dev/sdb: 0.000-953869.710 megabytes
> Disk label type: msdos
> Minor Start End Type Filesystem Flags
> 1 0.031 39997.771 primary ext3 boot, raid
> 2 39997.771 42045.117 primary linux-swap
> 3 42045.117 42296.132 primary ext3
> 4 42296.133 953867.219 primary ext3 raid
>
>
> I'm not asking because I'm picky, but just because, it would
> have made my life easier to fix bad blocks on disks by
> dd from good block on disk1 to bad block on disk2, and as
> next week I'll reinstall, I'd prefer to do it the right way.
>
> Some more bits about my environment:
>
> # cat /etc/redhat-release
> CentOS release 4.8 (Final)
>
> # uname -rms
> Linux 2.6.9-89.0.18.ELsmp i686
>
> Thank you and best regards.
> Robi

I've got a fairly simple script in a kickstart file I use[1] that
handles RAID 1 and RAID 5 partitioning. Perhaps it would help? Here is
the relevant snippet:

zerombr
clearpart --all --initlabel --drives=sda,sdb
ignoredisk --only-use=sda,sdb
bootloader --location=mbr --driveorder=sda,sdb --append="crashkernel=auto"

# /boot
part raid.01 --ondisk=sda --asprimary --size=256
part raid.02 --ondisk=sdb --asprimary --size=256
# /
part raid.11 --ondisk=sda --asprimary --size=40960
part raid.12 --ondisk=sdb --asprimary --size=40960
# <swap>
part raid.21 --ondisk=sda --asprimary --size=4096
part raid.22 --ondisk=sdb --asprimary --size=4096

# Format /boot and /.
raid /boot --fstype=ext3 --level=1 --device=md0 raid.01 raid.02
raid / --fstype=ext3 --level=1 --device=md1 raid.11 raid.12
raid swap --fstype=swap --level=1 --device=md2 raid.21 raid.22

The kickstart script above is specifically for RHEL 6, but it came
nearly unadapted from an older CentOS 4 kickstart script. The only line
that might be an issue is: "crashkernel=auto".

hth,

Digimer

1. http://wiki.alteeve.com/files/an-cluster/ks/generic_server_rhel6.ks

--
Digimer
E-Mail: digimer@alteeve.com
AN!Whitepapers: http://alteeve.com
Node Assassin: http://nodeassassin.org
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Roberto Nunnari 11-19-2010 08:32 AM

kickstart raid disk partitioning
 
Digimer ha scritto:
> On 11/18/2010 01:11 PM, Roberto Nunnari wrote:
>> Hello.
>>
>> A couple of years ago I installed two file-servers
>> using kickstart. The server has two 1TB sata disks
>> with two software raid1 partitions as follows:
>>
>> # cat /proc/mdstat
>> Personalities : [raid1]
>> md1 : active raid1 sdb4[1] sda4[0]
>> 933448704 blocks [2/2] [UU]
>> md0 : active raid1 sdb1[1] sda2[2](F)
>> 40957568 blocks [2/1] [_U]
>>
>>
>> Now the drives are starting to be failing and next week I'll
>> backup /homes, reinstall OS with kickstart, and finally
>> restore /homes.
>>
>> There's a problem with how the kickstart process partitions
>> the disks, though. As you may have noticed above, md0 is made
>> up of sdb1 and sda2.
>>
>> Could anybody help me understand how to make the partitions
>> on the two drives identical still using kickstart?
>>
>> Here's the relevant part from the kickstart file:
>>
>> zerombr yes
>> clearpart --all --initlabel
>> bootloader --location=mbr
>> part /boot --fstype ext3 --size 250 --asprimary --ondisk sda
>> part swap --size 2048 --asprimary --ondisk sda
>> part raid.01 --size 40000 --asprimary --ondisk sda
>> part raid.03 --size 1 --grow --asprimary --ondisk sda
>> part /boot2 --fstype ext3 --size 250 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
>> part swap --size 2048 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
>> part raid.02 --size 40000 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
>> part raid.04 --size 1 --grow --asprimary --ondisk sdb
>> raid / --level=1 --device=md0 --fstype ext3 raid.01 raid.02
>> raid /home --level=1 --device=md1 --fstype ext3 raid.03 raid.04
>>
>> ..but here's the produced partitioning on the two drives:
>>
>> # parted /dev/sda print
>> Disk geometry for /dev/sda: 0.000-953869.710 megabytes
>> Disk label type: msdos
>> Minor Start End Type Filesystem Flags
>> 1 0.031 251.015 primary ext3 boot
>> 2 251.016 40248.786 primary ext3 raid
>> 3 40248.787 42296.132 primary linux-swap
>> 4 42296.133 953867.219 primary ext3 raid
>>
>> # parted /dev/sdb print
>> Disk geometry for /dev/sdb: 0.000-953869.710 megabytes
>> Disk label type: msdos
>> Minor Start End Type Filesystem Flags
>> 1 0.031 39997.771 primary ext3 boot, raid
>> 2 39997.771 42045.117 primary linux-swap
>> 3 42045.117 42296.132 primary ext3
>> 4 42296.133 953867.219 primary ext3 raid
>>
>>
>> I'm not asking because I'm picky, but just because, it would
>> have made my life easier to fix bad blocks on disks by
>> dd from good block on disk1 to bad block on disk2, and as
>> next week I'll reinstall, I'd prefer to do it the right way.
>>
>> Some more bits about my environment:
>>
>> # cat /etc/redhat-release
>> CentOS release 4.8 (Final)
>>
>> # uname -rms
>> Linux 2.6.9-89.0.18.ELsmp i686
>>
>> Thank you and best regards.
>> Robi
>
> I've got a fairly simple script in a kickstart file I use[1] that
> handles RAID 1 and RAID 5 partitioning. Perhaps it would help? Here is
> the relevant snippet:
>
> zerombr
> clearpart --all --initlabel --drives=sda,sdb
> ignoredisk --only-use=sda,sdb
> bootloader --location=mbr --driveorder=sda,sdb --append="crashkernel=auto"
>
> # /boot
> part raid.01 --ondisk=sda --asprimary --size=256
> part raid.02 --ondisk=sdb --asprimary --size=256
> # /
> part raid.11 --ondisk=sda --asprimary --size=40960
> part raid.12 --ondisk=sdb --asprimary --size=40960
> # <swap>
> part raid.21 --ondisk=sda --asprimary --size=4096
> part raid.22 --ondisk=sdb --asprimary --size=4096
>
> # Format /boot and /.
> raid /boot --fstype=ext3 --level=1 --device=md0 raid.01 raid.02
> raid / --fstype=ext3 --level=1 --device=md1 raid.11 raid.12
> raid swap --fstype=swap --level=1 --device=md2 raid.21 raid.22
>
> The kickstart script above is specifically for RHEL 6, but it came
> nearly unadapted from an older CentOS 4 kickstart script. The only line
> that might be an issue is: "crashkernel=auto".
>
> hth,
>
> Digimer
>
> 1. http://wiki.alteeve.com/files/an-cluster/ks/generic_server_rhel6.ks

Thank you for your reply.

Does that kickstart effectly produces a partitioning that is
exactly the same on both disks? Because that is the problem
I'm facing: the partitioning produced by the kickstart
is different on the two drives.

Also, why did you put /boot and swap in raid? Was it for
obtaining identical partitioning on both drives?
For swap, the kernel already does performance optimization
when swap partitions are on different drives, and /boot..
I always tended to keep /boot be as simple as possible, to avoid
any problem during boot.. but maybe, these days with initramdisk
there's no more need for that..

Best regards.
Robi
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos

Rudi Ahlers 11-19-2010 08:43 AM

kickstart raid disk partitioning
 
On Fri, Nov 19, 2010 at 11:32 AM, Roberto Nunnari
<roberto.nunnari@supsi.ch> wrote:
> Digimer ha scritto:
>> On 11/18/2010 01:11 PM, Roberto Nunnari wrote:
>>> Hello.
>>>
>>> A couple of years ago I installed two file-servers
>>> using kickstart. The server has two 1TB sata disks
>>> with two software raid1 partitions as follows:
>>>
>>> # cat /proc/mdstat
>>> Personalities : [raid1]
>>> md1 : active raid1 sdb4[1] sda4[0]
>>> * * * * 933448704 blocks [2/2] [UU]
>>> md0 : active raid1 sdb1[1] sda2[2](F)
>>> * * * * 40957568 blocks [2/1] [_U]
>>>
>>>
>>> Now the drives are starting to be failing and next week I'll
>>> backup /homes, reinstall OS with kickstart, and finally
>>> restore /homes.
>>>
>>> There's a problem with how the kickstart process partitions
>>> the disks, though. As you may have noticed above, md0 is made
>>> up of sdb1 and sda2.
>>>
>>> Could anybody help me understand how to make the partitions
>>> on the two drives identical still using kickstart?
>>>
>>> Here's the relevant part from the kickstart file:
>>>
>>> zerombr yes
>>> clearpart --all --initlabel
>>> bootloader --location=mbr
>>> part /boot --fstype ext3 --size 250 --asprimary --ondisk sda
>>> part swap --size 2048 --asprimary --ondisk sda
>>> part raid.01 --size 40000 --asprimary --ondisk sda
>>> part raid.03 --size 1 --grow --asprimary --ondisk sda
>>> part /boot2 --fstype ext3 --size 250 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
>>> part swap --size 2048 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
>>> part raid.02 --size 40000 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
>>> part raid.04 --size 1 --grow --asprimary --ondisk sdb
>>> raid / --level=1 --device=md0 --fstype ext3 raid.01 raid.02
>>> raid /home --level=1 --device=md1 --fstype ext3 raid.03 raid.04
>>>
>>> ..but here's the produced partitioning on the two drives:
>>>
>>> # parted /dev/sda print
>>> Disk geometry for /dev/sda: 0.000-953869.710 megabytes
>>> Disk label type: msdos
>>> Minor * *Start * * * End * * Type * * *Filesystem *Flags
>>> 1 * * * * *0.031 * *251.015 *primary * ext3 * * * *boot
>>> 2 * * * *251.016 *40248.786 *primary * ext3 * * * *raid
>>> 3 * * *40248.787 *42296.132 *primary * linux-swap
>>> 4 * * *42296.133 953867.219 *primary * ext3 * * * *raid
>>>
>>> # parted /dev/sdb print
>>> Disk geometry for /dev/sdb: 0.000-953869.710 megabytes
>>> Disk label type: msdos
>>> Minor * *Start * * * End * * Type * * *Filesystem *Flags
>>> 1 * * * * *0.031 *39997.771 *primary * ext3 * * * *boot, raid
>>> 2 * * *39997.771 *42045.117 *primary * linux-swap
>>> 3 * * *42045.117 *42296.132 *primary * ext3
>>> 4 * * *42296.133 953867.219 *primary * ext3 * * * *raid
>>>
>>>
>>> I'm not asking because I'm picky, but just because, it would
>>> have made my life easier to fix bad blocks on disks by
>>> dd from good block on disk1 to bad block on disk2, and as
>>> next week I'll reinstall, I'd prefer to do it the right way.
>>>
>>> Some more bits about my environment:
>>>
>>> # cat /etc/redhat-release
>>> CentOS release 4.8 (Final)
>>>
>>> # uname -rms
>>> Linux 2.6.9-89.0.18.ELsmp i686
>>>
>>> Thank you and best regards.
>>> Robi
>>
>> I've got a fairly simple script in a kickstart file I use[1] that
>> handles RAID 1 and RAID 5 partitioning. Perhaps it would help? Here is
>> the relevant snippet:
>>
>> zerombr
>> clearpart --all --initlabel --drives=sda,sdb
>> ignoredisk --only-use=sda,sdb
>> bootloader *--location=mbr --driveorder=sda,sdb --append="crashkernel=auto"
>>
>> # /boot
>> part raid.01 --ondisk=sda --asprimary --size=256
>> part raid.02 --ondisk=sdb --asprimary --size=256
>> # /
>> part raid.11 --ondisk=sda --asprimary --size=40960
>> part raid.12 --ondisk=sdb --asprimary --size=40960
>> # <swap>
>> part raid.21 --ondisk=sda --asprimary --size=4096
>> part raid.22 --ondisk=sdb --asprimary --size=4096
>>
>> # Format /boot and /.
>> raid /boot --fstype=ext3 --level=1 --device=md0 raid.01 raid.02
>> raid / * * --fstype=ext3 --level=1 --device=md1 raid.11 raid.12
>> raid swap *--fstype=swap --level=1 --device=md2 raid.21 raid.22
>>
>> The kickstart script above is specifically for RHEL 6, but it came
>> nearly unadapted from an older CentOS 4 kickstart script. The only line
>> that might be an issue is: "crashkernel=auto".
>>
>> hth,
>>
>> Digimer
>>
>> 1. http://wiki.alteeve.com/files/an-cluster/ks/generic_server_rhel6.ks
>
> Thank you for your reply.
>
> Does that kickstart effectly produces a partitioning that is
> exactly the same on both disks? Because that is the problem
> I'm facing: the partitioning produced by the kickstart
> is different on the two drives.
>
> Also, why did you put /boot and swap in raid? Was it for
> obtaining identical partitioning on both drives?
> For swap, the kernel already does performance optimization
> when swap partitions are on different drives, and /boot..
> I always tended to keep /boot be as simple as possible, to avoid
> any problem during boot.. but maybe, these days with initramdisk
> there's no more need for that..
>
> Best regards.
> Robi
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>

Well, if the first drive fails, where you put /boot then you won't be
able to boot-up the 2nd HDD :)

So put /boot on a RAID1 partition so that it gets mirrored on both
drives for better redundancy

--
Kind Regards
Rudi Ahlers
SoftDux

Website: http://www.SoftDux.com
Technical Blog: http://Blog.SoftDux.com
Office: 087 805 9573
Cell: 082 554 7532
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CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos

Roberto Nunnari 11-19-2010 09:00 AM

kickstart raid disk partitioning
 
Rudi Ahlers ha scritto:
> On Fri, Nov 19, 2010 at 11:32 AM, Roberto Nunnari
> <roberto.nunnari@supsi.ch> wrote:
>> Digimer ha scritto:
>>> On 11/18/2010 01:11 PM, Roberto Nunnari wrote:
>>>> Hello.
>>>>
>>>> A couple of years ago I installed two file-servers
>>>> using kickstart. The server has two 1TB sata disks
>>>> with two software raid1 partitions as follows:
>>>>
>>>> # cat /proc/mdstat
>>>> Personalities : [raid1]
>>>> md1 : active raid1 sdb4[1] sda4[0]
>>>> 933448704 blocks [2/2] [UU]
>>>> md0 : active raid1 sdb1[1] sda2[2](F)
>>>> 40957568 blocks [2/1] [_U]
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Now the drives are starting to be failing and next week I'll
>>>> backup /homes, reinstall OS with kickstart, and finally
>>>> restore /homes.
>>>>
>>>> There's a problem with how the kickstart process partitions
>>>> the disks, though. As you may have noticed above, md0 is made
>>>> up of sdb1 and sda2.
>>>>
>>>> Could anybody help me understand how to make the partitions
>>>> on the two drives identical still using kickstart?
>>>>
>>>> Here's the relevant part from the kickstart file:
>>>>
>>>> zerombr yes
>>>> clearpart --all --initlabel
>>>> bootloader --location=mbr
>>>> part /boot --fstype ext3 --size 250 --asprimary --ondisk sda
>>>> part swap --size 2048 --asprimary --ondisk sda
>>>> part raid.01 --size 40000 --asprimary --ondisk sda
>>>> part raid.03 --size 1 --grow --asprimary --ondisk sda
>>>> part /boot2 --fstype ext3 --size 250 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
>>>> part swap --size 2048 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
>>>> part raid.02 --size 40000 --asprimary --ondisk sdb
>>>> part raid.04 --size 1 --grow --asprimary --ondisk sdb
>>>> raid / --level=1 --device=md0 --fstype ext3 raid.01 raid.02
>>>> raid /home --level=1 --device=md1 --fstype ext3 raid.03 raid.04
>>>>
>>>> ..but here's the produced partitioning on the two drives:
>>>>
>>>> # parted /dev/sda print
>>>> Disk geometry for /dev/sda: 0.000-953869.710 megabytes
>>>> Disk label type: msdos
>>>> Minor Start End Type Filesystem Flags
>>>> 1 0.031 251.015 primary ext3 boot
>>>> 2 251.016 40248.786 primary ext3 raid
>>>> 3 40248.787 42296.132 primary linux-swap
>>>> 4 42296.133 953867.219 primary ext3 raid
>>>>
>>>> # parted /dev/sdb print
>>>> Disk geometry for /dev/sdb: 0.000-953869.710 megabytes
>>>> Disk label type: msdos
>>>> Minor Start End Type Filesystem Flags
>>>> 1 0.031 39997.771 primary ext3 boot, raid
>>>> 2 39997.771 42045.117 primary linux-swap
>>>> 3 42045.117 42296.132 primary ext3
>>>> 4 42296.133 953867.219 primary ext3 raid
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I'm not asking because I'm picky, but just because, it would
>>>> have made my life easier to fix bad blocks on disks by
>>>> dd from good block on disk1 to bad block on disk2, and as
>>>> next week I'll reinstall, I'd prefer to do it the right way.
>>>>
>>>> Some more bits about my environment:
>>>>
>>>> # cat /etc/redhat-release
>>>> CentOS release 4.8 (Final)
>>>>
>>>> # uname -rms
>>>> Linux 2.6.9-89.0.18.ELsmp i686
>>>>
>>>> Thank you and best regards.
>>>> Robi
>>> I've got a fairly simple script in a kickstart file I use[1] that
>>> handles RAID 1 and RAID 5 partitioning. Perhaps it would help? Here is
>>> the relevant snippet:
>>>
>>> zerombr
>>> clearpart --all --initlabel --drives=sda,sdb
>>> ignoredisk --only-use=sda,sdb
>>> bootloader --location=mbr --driveorder=sda,sdb --append="crashkernel=auto"
>>>
>>> # /boot
>>> part raid.01 --ondisk=sda --asprimary --size=256
>>> part raid.02 --ondisk=sdb --asprimary --size=256
>>> # /
>>> part raid.11 --ondisk=sda --asprimary --size=40960
>>> part raid.12 --ondisk=sdb --asprimary --size=40960
>>> # <swap>
>>> part raid.21 --ondisk=sda --asprimary --size=4096
>>> part raid.22 --ondisk=sdb --asprimary --size=4096
>>>
>>> # Format /boot and /.
>>> raid /boot --fstype=ext3 --level=1 --device=md0 raid.01 raid.02
>>> raid / --fstype=ext3 --level=1 --device=md1 raid.11 raid.12
>>> raid swap --fstype=swap --level=1 --device=md2 raid.21 raid.22
>>>
>>> The kickstart script above is specifically for RHEL 6, but it came
>>> nearly unadapted from an older CentOS 4 kickstart script. The only line
>>> that might be an issue is: "crashkernel=auto".
>>>
>>> hth,
>>>
>>> Digimer
>>>
>>> 1. http://wiki.alteeve.com/files/an-cluster/ks/generic_server_rhel6.ks
>> Thank you for your reply.
>>
>> Does that kickstart effectly produces a partitioning that is
>> exactly the same on both disks? Because that is the problem
>> I'm facing: the partitioning produced by the kickstart
>> is different on the two drives.
>>
>> Also, why did you put /boot and swap in raid? Was it for
>> obtaining identical partitioning on both drives?
>> For swap, the kernel already does performance optimization
>> when swap partitions are on different drives, and /boot..
>> I always tended to keep /boot be as simple as possible, to avoid
>> any problem during boot.. but maybe, these days with initramdisk
>> there's no more need for that..
>>
>> Best regards.
>> Robi
>> _______________________________________________
>> CentOS mailing list
>> CentOS@centos.org
>> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>>
>
> Well, if the first drive fails, where you put /boot then you won't be
> able to boot-up the 2nd HDD :)
>
> So put /boot on a RAID1 partition so that it gets mirrored on both
> drives for better redundancy

hehe.. that's right, but if you look at my partitioning,
there's a /boot2 partition on the second drive where I
keep a copy of /boot.. even if master boot record is
gone with /boot, with a grub cd of floppy I can always
boot my system.

What about my original question about kickstart and
raid partitioning?

Thank you.
Robi
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John Hodrien 11-19-2010 09:08 AM

kickstart raid disk partitioning
 
On Fri, 19 Nov 2010, Roberto Nunnari wrote:

> hehe.. that's right, but if you look at my partitioning,
> there's a /boot2 partition on the second drive where I
> keep a copy of /boot.. even if master boot record is
> gone with /boot, with a grub cd of floppy I can always
> boot my system.

But then you have to make efforts to keep the two in sync. It entirely makes
sense to have /boot on RAID1. I'd say it's all upsides over your solution,
and no downsides.

jh
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Roberto Nunnari 11-19-2010 09:49 AM

kickstart raid disk partitioning
 
John Hodrien ha scritto:
> On Fri, 19 Nov 2010, Roberto Nunnari wrote:
>
>> hehe.. that's right, but if you look at my partitioning,
>> there's a /boot2 partition on the second drive where I
>> keep a copy of /boot.. even if master boot record is
>> gone with /boot, with a grub cd of floppy I can always
>> boot my system.
>
> But then you have to make efforts to keep the two in sync. It entirely makes
> sense to have /boot on RAID1. I'd say it's all upsides over your solution,
> and no downsides.

Yes, but rsync and cron are there to help.

In any case, I just realized it's not only initramdisk that
has to to understand and use software raid, but even
before that there's grub (or lilo.. anybody out there still use lilo
nodays?).. I suppose even legacy grub can boot from raid partition
otherwise, CentOS4's grub would not even boot.

But as already many on this list say it's better to have even
boot and swap on raid, then I'll try that way.

I hope that will give me two drives partitioned in exactly
the same way. This would be to me the greatest gain over
my solution.

Thank you very much to you all for your help.
Best regards.
Robi
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John Hodrien 11-19-2010 09:52 AM

kickstart raid disk partitioning
 
On Fri, 19 Nov 2010, Roberto Nunnari wrote:

> Yes, but rsync and cron are there to help.

But you're just papering over cracks.

> In any case, I just realized it's not only initramdisk that
> has to to understand and use software raid, but even
> before that there's grub (or lilo.. anybody out there still use lilo
> nodays?).. I suppose even legacy grub can boot from raid partition
> otherwise, CentOS4's grub would not even boot.

But you can freely mount read-only half of a raid1 set so grub doesn't have to
understand RAID. You have to install grub on both disks, but that's it.

> I hope that will give me two drives partitioned in exactly
> the same way. This would be to me the greatest gain over
> my solution.

Yes, you should definitely be able to do that.

jh
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Roberto Nunnari 11-19-2010 10:03 AM

kickstart raid disk partitioning
 
John Hodrien ha scritto:
> On Fri, 19 Nov 2010, Roberto Nunnari wrote:
>
>> Yes, but rsync and cron are there to help.
>
> But you're just papering over cracks.

Yes, in sight of what you say after, I agree.


>
>> In any case, I just realized it's not only initramdisk that
>> has to to understand and use software raid, but even
>> before that there's grub (or lilo.. anybody out there still use lilo
>> nodays?).. I suppose even legacy grub can boot from raid partition
>> otherwise, CentOS4's grub would not even boot.
>
> But you can freely mount read-only half of a raid1 set so grub doesn't have to
> understand RAID. You have to install grub on both disks, but that's it.

And this is a great idea.. I didn't know it was even possible to
mount read-only half of a raid1.

Thank you again!
Robi


>
>> I hope that will give me two drives partitioned in exactly
>> the same way. This would be to me the greatest gain over
>> my solution.
>
> Yes, you should definitely be able to do that.
>
> jh

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Roberto Nunnari 11-19-2010 12:10 PM

kickstart raid disk partitioning
 
Roberto Nunnari ha scritto:
> John Hodrien ha scritto:
>> On Fri, 19 Nov 2010, Roberto Nunnari wrote:
>>
>>> Yes, but rsync and cron are there to help.
>> But you're just papering over cracks.
>
> Yes, in sight of what you say after, I agree.
>
>
>>> In any case, I just realized it's not only initramdisk that
>>> has to to understand and use software raid, but even
>>> before that there's grub (or lilo.. anybody out there still use lilo
>>> nodays?).. I suppose even legacy grub can boot from raid partition
>>> otherwise, CentOS4's grub would not even boot.
>> But you can freely mount read-only half of a raid1 set so grub doesn't have to
>> understand RAID. You have to install grub on both disks, but that's it.
>
> And this is a great idea.. I didn't know it was even possible to
> mount read-only half of a raid1.

Could you please tell me how to tell grub and initrd to mount read-only
half of a raid1 set, please?

Thanks.
Robi


>
> Thank you again!
> Robi
>
>
>>> I hope that will give me two drives partitioned in exactly
>>> the same way. This would be to me the greatest gain over
>>> my solution.
>> Yes, you should definitely be able to do that.
>>
>> jh
>
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> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
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