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Old 09-24-2010, 09:25 PM
Dotan Cohen
 
Default Configuring BIND to answer to two domain names (four IP addresses)

All right, I think this should do it:

$ORIGIN exampleA.com.
$TTL 86400
exampleA.com. IN SOA ns1.exampleA.com. ns2.exampleA.com. (
2; Serial - increment me
10800
3600
604800
38400 )
IN NS ns1.exampleA.com.
IN NS ns2.exampleA.com.
IN A 178.63.65.136
IN A 178.63.65.188
www IN A 178.63.65.136
www IN A 178.63.65.188
ns1 IN A 178.63.65.136
ns2 IN A 178.63.65.188

What say the wise among us?

--
Dotan Cohen

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Old 09-24-2010, 09:54 PM
Dotan Cohen
 
Default Configuring BIND to answer to two domain names (four IP addresses)

On Fri, Sep 24, 2010 at 23:29, James A. Peltier <jpeltier@sfu.ca> wrote:
> Looks good. *you can change your 10800 3600 604800 and 38400 to hours, days or weeks represented by 1h, 1d or 1w respectively *to make it easier than calculating seconds.
>

Thank you!

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Old 09-24-2010, 10:06 PM
Robert Heller
 
Default Configuring BIND to answer to two domain names (four IP addresses)

At Fri, 24 Sep 2010 23:02:21 +0200 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
> On Fri, Sep 24, 2010 at 22:41, Robert Heller <heller@deepsoft.com> wrote:
> > You need:
> >
> > ns1.exampleA.com. IN * * *A * * * 1.1.1.1
> > ns2.exampleA.com. IN * * *A * * * 1.1.1.2
> >
>
> Here I have found conflicting information, it seems that some sources
> suggest this instead:
> ns1 IN A 1.1.1.1
> ns2 IN A 1.1.1.2
>
> Any idea?

When you have an $ORIGIN statement, it defines a suffix to automatically
add to any name that does not end in a '.'. You can do either,
depending on how gratiously verbose you want to be. Of course, being
verbose sort of defeats the whole point of the $ORIGIN statement...

>
> > And you might also consider:
> >
> > www.exampleA.com. IN * * *A * * * 1.1.1.1
> > www.exampleA.com. IN * * *A * * * 1.1.1.2
> >
>
> Yes, of course! Thanks.
>

--
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Old 09-24-2010, 10:21 PM
Dotan Cohen
 
Default Configuring BIND to answer to two domain names (four IP addresses)

On Sat, Sep 25, 2010 at 00:06, Robert Heller <heller@deepsoft.com> wrote:
> When you have an $ORIGIN statement, it defines a suffix to automatically
> add to any name that does not end in a '.'. *You can do either,
> depending on how gratiously verbose you want to be. *Of course, being
> verbose sort of defeats the whole point of the $ORIGIN statement...
>

I see, thanks.

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Old 09-24-2010, 10:21 PM
Dotan Cohen
 
Default Configuring BIND to answer to two domain names (four IP addresses)

On Sat, Sep 25, 2010 at 00:06, Robert Heller <heller@deepsoft.com> wrote:
> When you have an $ORIGIN statement, it defines a suffix to automatically
> add to any name that does not end in a '.'. *You can do either,
> depending on how gratiously verbose you want to be. *Of course, being
> verbose sort of defeats the whole point of the $ORIGIN statement...
>

I see, thanks.

--
Dotan Cohen

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Old 09-25-2010, 04:12 AM
 
Default Configuring BIND to answer to two domain names (four IP addresses)

On Fri, Sep 24, 2010 at 10:28:41PM +0200, Dotan Cohen wrote:
> On Fri, Sep 24, 2010 at 22:24, Alexander Dalloz <ad+lists@uni-x.org> wrote:
> > http://www.zytrax.com/books/dns/
> >
> > That is a good source to read up about bind configuration.
> >
> > As a sidenote please be aware, that if someone directly queries your
> > ns1.exampleA.com for exampleB.com zone records he will get proper
> > answers. If you would need to prevent this for any reason you would need
> > a extended bind config design using views.
> >
> > While the zytrax book has lessons about views you can too find a resource in
> >
> > http://www.cymru.com/Documents/secure-bind-template.html
> >
>
> Wow, thank you! There is some good reading there, especially the
> security link. Lots of little holes to exploit!
>
> I will be up for the night!

For completeness: there is the BIND 9 Administrator Reference Manual,
known as the ARM, usually supplied under /usr/share/doc/.
And what many consider to be the standard reference, Liu and Albitz's
"DNS and BIND" published by O'Reilly. I believe it's up to the
5th edition now; an earlier edition used to be provided online.
If you're serious about learning DNS you ought to consider this book.
--
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Old 09-26-2010, 10:55 AM
Dotan Cohen
 
Default Configuring BIND to answer to two domain names (four IP addresses)

On Sat, Sep 25, 2010 at 18:15, Les Mikesell <lesmikesell@gmail.com> wrote:
>> For completeness: there is the BIND 9 Administrator Reference Manual,
>> known as the ARM, usually supplied under /usr/share/doc/.
>> And what many consider to be the standard reference, Liu and Albitz's
>> "DNS and BIND" published by O'Reilly. I believe it's up to the
>> 5th edition now; an earlier edition used to be provided online.
>> If you're serious about learning DNS you ought to consider this book.
>
> Learning bind is sort of like learning sendmail though. *They both do a million
> things you'll never need (and if you do you should probably change your
> design...). *The trick - especially when you start with the full references - is
> to figure out the simple part you need to understand and ignore the rest. *And
> when using distribution-packaged versions, most of what you need is already there.
>

Most certainly. I think that my major problem is that I tried to
"learn BIND" instead of learning how to get it to do the specific
thing that I needed it to do. It's like learning the entire Japanese
language just to be sure to know how read the bathroom signs on a
two-hour stopover in Tokyo.

--
Dotan Cohen

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Old 09-26-2010, 04:35 PM
Ryan Wagoner
 
Default Configuring BIND to answer to two domain names (four IP addresses)

I think you should be able to do this using BIND views with
match-destinations. Have one view match destinations for 1.1.1.1 and
1.1.1.2 and the other for 1.1.1.3 and 1.1.1.4. Create a zone in one
view for exampleA.com and one in the other for exampleB.com

Ryan

On Fri, Sep 24, 2010 at 1:08 PM, Dotan Cohen <dotancohen@gmail.com> wrote:
> On a CentOS 5 server, I am having a hard time configuring BIND to
> answer to 4 IP addresses for 2 domain names.
>
> Currently, I have four IP addresses, for sake of discussion they are:
> 1.1.1.1
> 1.1.1.2
> 1.1.1.3
> 1.1.1.4
>
> Additionally, I have two domain names. For sake of discussion:
> exampleA.com
> exampleB.com
>
> My goal is to have 1.1.1.1 & 1.1.1.2 as the nameservers for
> exampleA.com, and 1.1.1.3 & 1.1.1.4 as the nameservers for
> exampleB.com. Apache is running on this machine, and should of course
> serve pages for the sites.
>
> I think that I've got the apache configuration down, but the BIND
> configuration is eluding me. I've read the following fine manual, but
> I am still stuck:
> http://www.centos.org/docs/5/html/Deployment_Guide-en-US/ch-bind.html
>
> Additionally, I have googled for "how to configure bind for multiple
> domain names" and the like, but I see no mention of the IP addresses
> configuration. Can I simply configure any IP address that the server
> answers to as the nameservers? What am I missing?
>
> Thank you in advance!
>
> --
> Dotan Cohen
>
> http://gibberish.co.il
> http://what-is-what.com
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
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Old 09-27-2010, 02:33 PM
Dotan Cohen
 
Default Configuring BIND to answer to two domain names (four IP addresses)

On Mon, Sep 27, 2010 at 13:27, Brent L. Bates <blbates@vigyan.com> wrote:
> * * Just noticed something. *Have your serial number reflect the date you
> last updated the file. *That way you will know when you last changed it. *For
> example, today is September 27, 2010, if you were making your first update
> today, make the serial number 2010092701. *I add on 2 digits at the end in
> case I need to make more than one change in one day. *Changing it 10 times in
> one day isn't likely, but just in case that isn't enough, I know *I* will not
> be making more than 100 changes in one day. *Serial numbers ALWAYS have to
> increase with each change. *That is the way other name servers know they need
> to update their information. *If the serial number is bigger than what they
> have stored, then they know they need to download the new information. *If you
> plan on updating the DNS information more than 100 times a day, you will need
> to give yourself some extra digits. *I hope this is of some help.
>

I think that the fine manual mentioned something about if one hundreds
edits were done in a single day, then it is time to go home and get
some sleep!

--
Dotan Cohen

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