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Old 09-02-2010, 05:18 PM
Tim Nelson
 
Default how long to reboot server ?

----- "mcclnx mcc" <mcclnx@yahoo.com.tw> wrote:
> we have CENTOS 5 on DELL servers. some servers have longer than one
> year did not reboot. Our consultant suggest we need at least reboot
> once every year to clean out memory junk.
>
> What is your opinion?
>

If you're running a Windows server, yes, a period reboot is necessary to 'clean it out'. However, in Linux land, this is not typically necessary as a 'rule'. You could certainly be running applications with memory leaks or other special circumstances that warrant a clean boot.

I have several Linux boxes running a variety of flavors including CentOS, Debian, and even Redhat (think old 8.x/9.x days) with uptimes ranging between 13 months to over two years. They're running perfectly without the 'yearly reboot'.

--Tim
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Old 09-02-2010, 05:24 PM
Hal Martin
 
Default how long to reboot server ?

Unless you have zombie processes or are upgrading the kernel, IMHO
there is no reason to reboot.

-Hal

On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 1:18 PM, Tim Nelson <tnelson@rockbochs.com> wrote:
> ----- "mcclnx mcc" <mcclnx@yahoo.com.tw> wrote:
>> we have CENTOS 5 on DELL servers. *some servers have longer than one
>> year did not reboot. *Our consultant suggest we need at least reboot
>> once every year to clean out memory junk.
>>
>> What is your opinion?
>>
>
> If you're running a Windows server, yes, a period reboot is necessary to 'clean it out'. However, in Linux land, this is not typically necessary as a 'rule'. You could certainly be running applications with memory leaks or other special circumstances that warrant a clean boot.
>
> I have several Linux boxes running a variety of flavors including CentOS, Debian, and even Redhat (think old 8.x/9.x days) with uptimes ranging between 13 months to over two years. They're running perfectly without the 'yearly reboot'.
>
> --Tim
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
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Old 09-02-2010, 05:27 PM
Brian Mathis
 
Default how long to reboot server ?

Uptime is no longer a badge of honor. Typically there will have been
some kernel updates that require a reboot, so a long uptime means they
haven't been applied. Also, it is a good idea to reboot periodically
to catch anything that was not set up to start on boot correctly. A
server should always cleanly start up with all services it needs
without the need for human intervention.

As for "memory junk", yes and no. This would again be related to
updates. If there are long running processes that have since had
updates or updates to shared libraries, they may not be using the
updated libraries. It would also reset anything that might have a
memory leak. However, the idea of "junk" collecting in RAM That needs
to be cleaned is not really true.


On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 1:17 PM, mcclnx mcc <mcclnx@yahoo.com.tw> wrote:
> we have CENTOS 5 on DELL servers. *some servers have longer than one year did not reboot. *Our consultant suggest we need at least reboot once every year to clean out memory junk.
>
> What is your opinion?
>
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Old 09-02-2010, 05:30 PM
Rob Kampen
 
Default how long to reboot server ?

Tim Nelson wrote:

----- "mcclnx mcc" <mcclnx@yahoo.com.tw> wrote:


we have CENTOS 5 on DELL servers. some servers have longer than one
year did not reboot. Our consultant suggest we need at least reboot
once every year to clean out memory junk.

What is your opinion?




If you're running a Windows server, yes, a period reboot is necessary to 'clean it out'. However, in Linux land, this is not typically necessary as a 'rule'. You could certainly be running applications with memory leaks or other special circumstances that warrant a clean boot.

I have several Linux boxes running a variety of flavors including CentOS, Debian, and even Redhat (think old 8.x/9.x days) with uptimes ranging between 13 months to over two years. They're running perfectly without the 'yearly reboot'.



If the server is not internet facing and thus vulnerable to various
attacks, one can leave them running just fine. I had an asterisk server
on Centos 5.1 that had an uptime of nearly 800 days before I had to
relocate it.

If the server is accessible directly from the internet it may well be
prudent to reboot to enable the latest kernel patches.

YMMV - I normally reboot my web servers every 90~120 days if there have
been updates to the kernel.


--Tim
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Old 09-02-2010, 05:31 PM
Paul Heinlein
 
Default how long to reboot server ?

On Thu, 2 Sep 2010, Brian Mathis wrote:

> Uptime is no longer a badge of honor. Typically there will have
> been some kernel updates that require a reboot, so a long uptime
> means they haven't been applied. Also, it is a good idea to reboot
> periodically to catch anything that was not set up to start on boot
> correctly. A server should always cleanly start up with all
> services it needs without the need for human intervention.

+1

The longer you go between restarts, the harder it is to identify
changes on the running system that might interfere with a clean boot
process. So I reboot my servers regularly.

That said, I've had workstation uptimes of 800 to 900 days... :-)

--
Paul Heinlein <> heinlein@madboa.com <> http://www.madboa.com/
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Old 09-02-2010, 05:39 PM
Stephen Harris
 
Default how long to reboot server ?

On Thu, Sep 02, 2010 at 01:27:22PM -0400, Brian Mathis wrote:
> Uptime is no longer a badge of honor. Typically there will have been
> some kernel updates that require a reboot, so a long uptime means they
> haven't been applied. Also, it is a good idea to reboot periodically
> to catch anything that was not set up to start on boot correctly. A
> server should always cleanly start up with all services it needs
> without the need for human intervention.

Indeed. At my place we reboot production machines every 90 days. Or
are meant to; I don't think management have worked out that rebooting
10,000 machines every 90 days means a lot of reboot activity!!

(The idea being to verify that services will come up after some form
of DC-wide outage; last think we want in a "business contingency" situation
is a few hundred servers not working properly 'cos the rc scripts are
broken)

--

rgds
Stephen
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Old 09-02-2010, 06:02 PM
Kwan Lowe
 
Default how long to reboot server ?

On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 1:17 PM, mcclnx mcc <mcclnx@yahoo.com.tw> wrote:
> we have CENTOS 5 on DELL servers. *some servers have longer than one year did not reboot. *Our consultant suggest we need at least reboot once every year to clean out memory junk.
>
> What is your opinion?
>

As someone else mentioned, uptime is no reason to brag...
That said, I manage one Linux system that's been running continuously
for 1,400 days. It will be upgraded in the near future, but it's
nonsense that you'd need to reboot to "clean out memory".
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Old 09-02-2010, 07:16 PM
Robert Heller
 
Default how long to reboot server ?

At Fri, 3 Sep 2010 01:17:15 +0800 (CST) CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
> we have CENTOS 5 on DELL servers. some servers have longer than one year did not reboot. Our consultant suggest we need at least reboot once every year to clean out memory junk.
>
> What is your opinion?

You only need to reboot when you do kernel upgrades.

>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
>

--
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933
Deepwoods Software -- Download the Model Railroad System
http://www.deepsoft.com/ -- Binaries for Linux and MS-Windows
heller@deepsoft.com -- http://www.deepsoft.com/ModelRailroadSystem/

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Old 09-02-2010, 08:29 PM
Rudi Ahlers
 
Default how long to reboot server ?

On 2010/09/02 07:39 PM, Stephen Harris wrote:

On Thu, Sep 02, 2010 at 01:27:22PM -0400, Brian Mathis wrote:


Uptime is no longer a badge of honor. Typically there will have been
some kernel updates that require a reboot, so a long uptime means they
haven't been applied. Also, it is a good idea to reboot periodically
to catch anything that was not set up to start on boot correctly. A
server should always cleanly start up with all services it needs
without the need for human intervention.



Indeed. At my place we reboot production machines every 90 days. Or
are meant to; I don't think management have worked out that rebooting
10,000 machines every 90 days means a lot of reboot activity!!

(The idea being to verify that services will come up after some form
of DC-wide outage; last think we want in a "business contingency" situation
is a few hundred servers not working properly 'cos the rc scripts are
broken)




Interesting..... This generally won't happen on a rock solid OS like
CentOS, unless someone really screwed up badly or it's a
super-custom build which can't be updated using normal CentOS
repositories.



We don't reboot servers (CentOS at least), unless we really really
need to. For minor kernel updates that doesn't give much more than
what we need we don't reboot either. Only for more critical / major
/ highly* important kernel updates, or hardware upgrades do we
reboot.



--

Kind Regards
Rudi Ahlers, SoftDux MD

Website: http://www.SoftDux.com
Blog: http://Blog.SoftDux.com
Support: http://Billing.SoftDux.com

Office: 087 805 9573
Cell: 082 554 7532
Fax: 086 609 6128


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Old 09-02-2010, 08:39 PM
Stephen Harris
 
Default how long to reboot server ?

On Thu, Sep 02, 2010 at 10:29:35PM +0200, Rudi Ahlers wrote:
> On 2010/09/02 07:39 PM, Stephen Harris wrote:
> >Indeed. At my place we reboot production machines every 90 days. Or
> >are meant to; I don't think management have worked out that rebooting
> >10,000 machines every 90 days means a lot of reboot activity!!
> >
> >(The idea being to verify that services will come up after some form
> >of DC-wide outage; last think we want in a "business contingency" situation
> >is a few hundred servers not working properly 'cos the rc scripts are
> >broken)
>
> Interesting..... This generally won't happen on a rock solid OS like
> CentOS, unless someone really screwed up badly or it's a super-custom
> build which can't be updated using normal CentOS repositories.
>
> We don't reboot servers (CentOS at least), unless we really really need
> to. For minor kernel updates that doesn't give much more than what we
> need we don't reboot either. Only for more critical / major / highly
> important kernel updates, or hardware upgrades do we reboot.

You never upgrade the application? The database? Make config changes?
Wow... to live in such a static world :-)

Most of our problems aren't OS related, they're app or config
related... "change shared memory parameters for oracle", "start this at
boot time", "add new network interface"... these all may prevent the
server from booting cleanly and aren't the OS's fault. You don't want to
find that out during a crisis scenario!

--

rgds
Stephen
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