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Old 08-01-2010, 05:28 PM
Edward Diener
 
Default Boot message about "resume device"

When I boot CentOS 5.5, I receive the message:

Unable to access resume device ( UUID = some UUID etc. )

How do I find out what actual device to which this UUID refers ? It does
not appear to be a block device since it does not show when I try 'blkid'.
To what does "resume device" refer ?

The boot succeeds but I would like to know what this messages means.

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Old 08-01-2010, 10:20 PM
Tom H
 
Default Boot message about "resume device"

On Sun, Aug 1, 2010 at 1:28 PM, Edward Diener <eldiener@tropicsoft.com> wrote:
> When I boot CentOS 5.5, I receive the message:
>
> Unable to access resume device ( UUID = some UUID etc. )
>
> How do I find out what actual device to which this UUID refers ? It does
> not appear to be a block device since it does not show when I try 'blkid'.
> To what does "resume device" refer ?
>
> The boot succeeds but I would like to know what this messages means.

UUID?! "resume" must be set to that UUID in /init in your initrd.
Updating/recreating your initrd should fix this problem.
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Old 08-01-2010, 11:10 PM
Edward Diener
 
Default Boot message about "resume device"

Tom H wrote:
> On Sun, Aug 1, 2010 at 1:28 PM, Edward Diener <eldiener@tropicsoft.com> wrote:
>> When I boot CentOS 5.5, I receive the message:
>>
>> Unable to access resume device ( UUID = some UUID etc. )
>>
>> How do I find out what actual device to which this UUID refers ? It does
>> not appear to be a block device since it does not show when I try 'blkid'.
>> To what does "resume device" refer ?
>>
>> The boot succeeds but I would like to know what this messages means.
>
> UUID?! "resume" must be set to that UUID in /init in your initrd.
> Updating/recreating your initrd should fix this problem.

How does one "update/recreate" the initrd image ?

Why would initrd hard-code a partition UUID ? If the UUID changes, which
it has in my case when I had to move and reformat the swap partition,
then the initrd image is now wrong.

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Old 08-02-2010, 12:06 AM
Robert Heller
 
Default Boot message about "resume device"

At Sun, 01 Aug 2010 19:10:47 -0400 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
> Tom H wrote:
> > On Sun, Aug 1, 2010 at 1:28 PM, Edward Diener <eldiener@tropicsoft.com> wrote:
> >> When I boot CentOS 5.5, I receive the message:
> >>
> >> Unable to access resume device ( UUID = some UUID etc. )
> >>
> >> How do I find out what actual device to which this UUID refers ? It does
> >> not appear to be a block device since it does not show when I try 'blkid'.
> >> To what does "resume device" refer ?
> >>
> >> The boot succeeds but I would like to know what this messages means.
> >
> > UUID?! "resume" must be set to that UUID in /init in your initrd.
> > Updating/recreating your initrd should fix this problem.
>
> How does one "update/recreate" the initrd image ?

mkinitrd -f /boot/initrd-`uname -r`.img `uname -r`

>
> Why would initrd hard-code a partition UUID ? If the UUID changes, which
> it has in my case when I had to move and reformat the swap partition,
> then the initrd image is now wrong.

It might also depend on what you have for kernel command line parameters
and/or what /etc/fstab looks like and/or what your hibernate/resume
config looks like. I believe it is possible for these things to use
more 'symbolic' things (like LABEL= for example [yes, mkswap can label a
swap partition]).

mkinitrd looks in various places to figure out what the swap partition
is 'called' and is probably falling back to the UUID as the fallback
choice.

>
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
>

--
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933
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http://www.deepsoft.com/ -- Binaries for Linux and MS-Windows
heller@deepsoft.com -- http://www.deepsoft.com/ModelRailroadSystem/

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Old 08-02-2010, 12:54 AM
Tom H
 
Default Boot message about "resume device"

On Sun, Aug 1, 2010 at 8:06 PM, Robert Heller <heller@deepsoft.com> wrote:
> At Sun, 01 Aug 2010 19:10:47 -0400 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:
>> Tom H wrote:
>> > On Sun, Aug 1, 2010 at 1:28 PM, Edward Diener <eldiener@tropicsoft.com> wrote:
>> >> When I boot CentOS 5.5, I receive the message:
>> >>
>> >> Unable to access resume device ( UUID = some UUID etc. )
>> >>
>> >> How do I find out what actual device to which this UUID refers ? It does
>> >> not appear to be a block device since it does not show when I try 'blkid'.
>> >> To what does "resume device" refer ?
>> >>
>> >> The boot succeeds but I would like to know what this messages means.
>> >
>> > UUID?! "resume" must be set to that UUID in /init in your initrd.
>> > Updating/recreating your initrd should fix this problem.
>>
>> How does one "update/recreate" the initrd image ?
>
> mkinitrd -f /boot/initrd-`uname -r`.img `uname -r`
>>
>> Why would initrd hard-code a partition UUID ? If the UUID changes, which
>> it has in my case when I had to move and reformat the swap partition,
>> then the initrd image is now wrong.
>
> It might also depend on what you have for kernel command line parameters
> and/or what /etc/fstab looks like and/or what your hibernate/resume
> config looks like. *I believe it is possible for these things to use
> more 'symbolic' things (like LABEL= for example [yes, mkswap can label a
> swap partition]).
>
> mkinitrd looks in various places to figure out what the swap partition
> is 'called' and is probably falling back to the UUID as the fallback
> choice.

mkinitrd looks for swap in fstab to get the resume partition and swap
doesn't *_usually_* change, whether defined using LABEL or UUID.
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