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Old 07-30-2010, 05:37 AM
Ron Blizzard
 
Default When should LVM be used?

In my old computer I have a much bigger hard drive then in this one --
and I plan to hand that old computer down to one of my sons -- keeping
his current drive from an even older computer. Currently the hard
drive on my old computer has SuSE Linux, but that will go. I'll
rebuild CentOS 5.5 on it, but I want to leave some free space for
whatever comes up and also dual-boot Vector Linux. Which, at last,
brings me to the question...

Is there any reason to use LVM on a personal desktop install of
CentOS? It seems to me, for my purposes, that LVM is just a pain in
the neck -- although I've always just let CentOS set it up during the
install in the past. I would like to be able to use parted to resize
partitions when I want to, and also I'd like Vector Linux to be able
to read and write data to the CentOS partition. Would I be missing
something by not installing LVM, or is this mostly for server purposes
anyhow?

Thanks for any pointers.

--
RonB -- Using CentOS 5.5
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Old 07-30-2010, 05:57 AM
Fajar Priyanto
 
Default When should LVM be used?

On Fri, Jul 30, 2010 at 1:37 PM, Ron Blizzard <rb4centos@gmail.com> wrote:
> Is there any reason to use LVM on a personal desktop install of
> CentOS? It seems to me, for my purposes, that LVM is just a pain in
> the neck -- although I've always just let CentOS set it up during the
> install in the past. *I would like to be able to use parted to resize
> partitions when I want to, and also I'd like Vector Linux to be able
> to read and write data to the CentOS partition. Would I be missing
> something by not installing LVM, or is this mostly for server purposes
> anyhow?

You don't need LVM if you don't plan to expand the filesystem (or a
particular mount point).
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Old 07-30-2010, 10:50 AM
Juergen Gotteswinter
 
Default When should LVM be used?

On 07/30/2010 07:37 AM, Ron Blizzard wrote:
> In my old computer I have a much bigger hard drive then in this one --
> and I plan to hand that old computer down to one of my sons -- keeping
> his current drive from an even older computer. Currently the hard
> drive on my old computer has SuSE Linux, but that will go. I'll
> rebuild CentOS 5.5 on it, but I want to leave some free space for
> whatever comes up and also dual-boot Vector Linux. Which, at last,
> brings me to the question...
>
> Is there any reason to use LVM on a personal desktop install of
> CentOS? It seems to me, for my purposes, that LVM is just a pain in
> the neck -- although I've always just let CentOS set it up during the
> install in the past. I would like to be able to use parted to resize
> partitions when I want to, and also I'd like Vector Linux to be able
> to read and write data to the CentOS partition. Would I be missing
> something by not installing LVM, or is this mostly for server purposes
> anyhow?
>
> Thanks for any pointers.
>

* snaphotting (great for db backup)
* resizing partition
* "online" partitioning

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Old 07-30-2010, 11:18 AM
Robert Heller
 
Default When should LVM be used?

At Fri, 30 Jul 2010 00:37:21 -0500 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
> In my old computer I have a much bigger hard drive then in this one --
> and I plan to hand that old computer down to one of my sons -- keeping
> his current drive from an even older computer. Currently the hard
> drive on my old computer has SuSE Linux, but that will go. I'll
> rebuild CentOS 5.5 on it, but I want to leave some free space for
> whatever comes up and also dual-boot Vector Linux. Which, at last,
> brings me to the question...
>
> Is there any reason to use LVM on a personal desktop install of
> CentOS? It seems to me, for my purposes, that LVM is just a pain in
> the neck -- although I've always just let CentOS set it up during the
> install in the past. I would like to be able to use parted to resize
> partitions when I want to, and also I'd like Vector Linux to be able
> to read and write data to the CentOS partition. Would I be missing
> something by not installing LVM, or is this mostly for server purposes
> anyhow?

LVM has a number of useful features and advantages. The 'default'
RedHat/CentOS LVM setup (basically creating one LVM volume taking up all
available space for the root file system), is pretty useless. With
modern *large* disks. LVM (if set up properly) allows creating and/or
resizing logical disks without having to shutdown and/or rebooting the
system. This is often usefull for installing virtual processes (eg with
xen).

>
> Thanks for any pointers.
>

--
Robert Heller -- Get the Deepwoods Software FireFox Toolbar!
Deepwoods Software -- Linux Installation and Administration
http://www.deepsoft.com/ -- Web Hosting, with CGI and Database
heller@deepsoft.com -- Contract Programming: C/C++, Tcl/Tk


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Old 07-30-2010, 01:13 PM
Benjamin Franz
 
Default When should LVM be used?

On 07/29/2010 10:57 PM, Fajar Priyanto wrote:
> On Fri, Jul 30, 2010 at 1:37 PM, Ron Blizzard<rb4centos@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Is there any reason to use LVM on a personal desktop install of
>> CentOS? It seems to me, for my purposes, that LVM is just a pain in
>> the neck -- although I've always just let CentOS set it up during the
>> install in the past. I would like to be able to use parted to resize
>> partitions when I want to, and also I'd like Vector Linux to be able
>> to read and write data to the CentOS partition. Would I be missing
>> something by not installing LVM, or is this mostly for server purposes
>> anyhow?
>>
> You don't need LVM if you don't plan to expand the filesystem (or a
> particular mount point).
>

You can use LVM for taking snapshots as well (very useful if you want to
quiesce databases for the shortest possible time for backups) . And you
can use LVM to migrate data from an old drive to a new one or even to
*shrink* a partition. I've never found LVM to 'be a pain'. 99% of the
time it's invisible, and 1% of the time it's indispensable.

--
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Old 07-30-2010, 01:33 PM
Todd Denniston
 
Default When should LVM be used?

Ron Blizzard wrote, On 07/30/2010 01:37 AM:
> Is there any reason to use LVM on a personal desktop install of
> CentOS? It seems to me, for my purposes, that LVM is just a pain in
> the neck -- although I've always just let CentOS set it up during the
> install in the past. I would like to be able to use parted to resize
> partitions when I want to, and also I'd like Vector Linux to be able
> to read and write data to the CentOS partition. Would I be missing
> something by not installing LVM, or is this mostly for server purposes
> anyhow?
>
> Thanks for any pointers.
>

Best use for LVM I have seen...
Reducing the number of times you need to enter the LUKS pass phrase to once per boot, i.e., one LUKS
containing an LVM of / and Swap so that the system can boot with one entry of the pass phrase and if
you then have other partitions, such as an independent /home, /etc/crypttab can be used (with
appropriately constructed and protected cryptpassphrase files).

--
Todd Denniston
Crane Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC Crane)
Harnessing the Power of Technology for the Warfighter
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Old 07-30-2010, 09:01 PM
Ron Blizzard
 
Default When should LVM be used?

On Fri, Jul 30, 2010 at 12:57 AM, Fajar Priyanto <fajarpri@arinet.org> wrote:

> You don't need LVM if you don't plan to expand the filesystem (or a
> particular mount point).

Okay, thanks. By reading the responses, it appears the very least I
should do is not let CentOS do a standard setup -- in other words I
should save some space on the hard drive.

--
RonB -- Using CentOS 5.5
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Old 07-30-2010, 09:07 PM
Ron Blizzard
 
Default When should LVM be used?

On Fri, Jul 30, 2010 at 5:50 AM, Juergen Gotteswinter <jg@internetx.de> wrote:

> * snaphotting (great for db backup)
> * resizing partition
> * "online" partitioning

I didn't know LVM would do snapshots -- I'll have to look into that.
But I'm guessing the feature is pretty much worthless if the whole
hard drive is taken up by one LVM partition -- which has been my
CentOS default setups.

Thanks.

--
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Old 07-30-2010, 09:11 PM
Ron Blizzard
 
Default When should LVM be used?

On Fri, Jul 30, 2010 at 6:18 AM, Robert Heller <heller@deepsoft.com> wrote:

> LVM has a number of useful features and advantages. *The 'default'
> RedHat/CentOS LVM setup (basically creating one LVM volume taking up all
> available space for the root file system), is pretty useless. *With
> modern *large* disks. *LVM (if set up properly) allows creating and/or
> resizing logical disks without having to shutdown and/or rebooting the
> system. *This is often usefull for installing virtual processes (eg with
> xen).

Thanks. I don't know if my 160 Gig hard drive would qualify as a
modern *large* disk or not, but it's definitely bigger than the
current 20 Gig one. I thought an external USB drive would work fine,
but I'm finding the current situation is too cramped.

Is there any way to mount an LVM partition from another Linux distribution?

--
RonB -- Using CentOS 5.5
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Old 07-30-2010, 09:14 PM
Ron Blizzard
 
Default When should LVM be used?

On Fri, Jul 30, 2010 at 8:13 AM, Benjamin Franz <jfranz@freerun.com> wrote:

> You can use LVM for taking snapshots as well (very useful if you want to
> quiesce databases for the shortest possible time for backups) . *And you
> can use LVM to migrate data from an old drive to a new one or even to
> *shrink* a partition. I've never found LVM to 'be a pain'. 99% of the
> time it's invisible, and 1% of the time it's indispensable.

I guess my ignorance is showing. It could also be that the small hard
drives that I usually use with CentOS really can't take advantage of
this feature. So far I haven't done much with servers, but I have been
experimenting with Asterisk and plan to work through the "Foundations
of CentOS" -- so that should change.

--
RonB -- Using CentOS 5.5
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