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Old 08-09-2010, 09:00 AM
Ron Blizzard
 
Default When should LVM be used?

On Sat, Jul 31, 2010 at 8:52 AM, Drew <drew.kay@gmail.com> wrote:

> LVM adds flexability that regular partitioning can't.
>
> Example 1. Say you've mounted an entire 2TB disk as /home and it's
> almost full. Now you want to add another 2TB to /home. How do you?
> Easiest way is with LVM. You just add the new disk into LVM's pool of
> storage and expand the home partition (Logical volume) to use the new
> space. Now you have a single filesystem spread across two disks.
>
> Example 2. Now let's say that you bought a NAS device (QNAP, Drobo,
> Buffalo) that does iSCSI or NFS and you want to move your data off the
> two local disks. With LVM you just add the new 'disk' into the pool
> then tell LVM to move existing data off the 'old' disk.
>
> Try doing that with parted. :-P

I understand the advantages when using a server, but my personal
computer is a Small Form Factor Dell GX270 with only one hard drive
slot. But I'll look closer into LVM options when I install on the
bigger hard drive. Thanks.

--
RonB -- Using CentOS 5.5
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Old 08-09-2010, 09:06 AM
Rudi Ahlers
 
Default When should LVM be used?

On Mon, Aug 9, 2010 at 11:00 AM, Ron Blizzard <rb4centos@gmail.com> wrote:


On Sat, Jul 31, 2010 at 8:52 AM, Drew <drew.kay@gmail.com> wrote:

> LVM adds flexability that regular partitioning can't.
>
> Example 1. Say you've mounted an entire 2TB disk as /home and it's


> almost full. Now you want to add another 2TB to /home. How do you?
> Easiest way is with LVM. You just add the new disk into LVM's pool of
> storage and expand the home partition (Logical volume) to use the new


> space. Now you have a single filesystem spread across two disks.
>
> Example 2. Now let's say that you bought a NAS device (QNAP, Drobo,
> Buffalo) that does iSCSI or NFS and you want to move your data off the


> two local disks. With LVM you just add the new 'disk' into the pool
> then tell LVM to move existing data off the 'old' disk.
>
> Try doing that with parted. :-P

I understand the advantages when using a server, but my personal


computer is a Small Form Factor Dell GX270 with only one hard drive
slot. *But I'll look closer into LVM options when I install on the
bigger hard drive. Thanks.


--
RonB -- Using CentOS 5.5
_______________________________________________



*
*
Even in this case, LVM could be useful. In general, you don't want to put everything in on large partition. What do you do with 1TB's worth of data when you decide to upgrade CentOS 4 to 5 (as an example) or install Ubuntu? With LVM, you simply create a 900MB LVM volume for your data and reinstall the OS


*
BUT, let's say you decide to allocate 10GB to /, 4GB to swap & 1GB to /tmp. Suddenly your / partition is full and you can't install more stuff. With LVM you can quickly shrink /home and increase the size of /. All on the go without having to reboot. I found this very handy while working on a Windows VM installed on my home PC, which was busy doing some video rendering and I didn't want to stop the rendering to increse the / partition.


*



--
Kind Regards
Rudi Ahlers
SoftDux

Website: http://www.SoftDux.com
Technical Blog: http://Blog.SoftDux.com


Office: 087 805 9573
Cell: 082 554 7532

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Old 08-09-2010, 10:09 AM
James Hogarth
 
Default When should LVM be used?

>
> BUT, let's say you decide to allocate 10GB to /, 4GB to swap & 1GB to /tmp.
> Suddenly your / partition is full and you can't install more stuff. With LVM
> you can quickly shrink /home and increase the size of /. All on the go
> without having to reboot. I found this very handy while working on a Windows
> VM installed on my home PC, which was busy doing some video rendering and I
> didn't want to stop the rendering to increse the / partition.
>

Just a note to say this behaviour is dependant on the filesystem on
top of the LVM logical volume.... Some (most?) will require you to
take the mounted volume offline to shrink with not all allowing online
increasing of size... so it is important to double check the
documentation for your filesystem before carrying out such an exercise
whilst the volume is mounted... and of course as with any changes to
partitioning information and volumes ensure you have a backup of the
data when resizing (especially shrinking) in case of any corruption or
issues in the process....

James
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Old 08-09-2010, 12:00 PM
Robert Heller
 
Default When should LVM be used?

At Mon, 9 Aug 2010 04:00:27 -0500 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
> On Sat, Jul 31, 2010 at 8:52 AM, Drew <drew.kay@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > LVM adds flexability that regular partitioning can't.
> >
> > Example 1. Say you've mounted an entire 2TB disk as /home and it's
> > almost full. Now you want to add another 2TB to /home. How do you?
> > Easiest way is with LVM. You just add the new disk into LVM's pool of
> > storage and expand the home partition (Logical volume) to use the new
> > space. Now you have a single filesystem spread across two disks.
> >
> > Example 2. Now let's say that you bought a NAS device (QNAP, Drobo,
> > Buffalo) that does iSCSI or NFS and you want to move your data off the
> > two local disks. With LVM you just add the new 'disk' into the pool
> > then tell LVM to move existing data off the 'old' disk.
> >
> > Try doing that with parted. :-P
>
> I understand the advantages when using a server, but my personal
> computer is a Small Form Factor Dell GX270 with only one hard drive
> slot. But I'll look closer into LVM options when I install on the
> bigger hard drive. Thanks.

I use LVM on my *laptop* with a 40 gig hard drive... Very convientent,
esp. when I upgraded from CentOS 4.8 to CentOS 5.<mumble>. My laptop
does NOT have any removable media -- that is it is NOT possible to boot
off a live CD to repartition the hard drive, so using something like
parted is not really a useful option. I can do a PXE boot and run the
installer that way. Is is just easier to be able to 'repartition' while
running the live system (eg doing lvcreate, lvresize, etc. as needed).

>

--
Robert Heller -- Get the Deepwoods Software FireFox Toolbar!
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Old 08-09-2010, 12:42 PM
Drew
 
Default When should LVM be used?

> I understand the advantages when using a server, but my personal
> computer is a Small Form Factor Dell GX270 with only one hard drive
> slot. *But I'll look closer into LVM options when I install on the
> bigger hard drive. Thanks.

Those examples actually came from situations I faced with a home PC.

I had a small VIA Epia based PC with a 40GB internal drive that I had
to expand because it didn't have enough space. I added a couple of
external USB enclosures and expanded that way. Later on I ended up
migrating the same data off the external enclosures and onto a QNAP
I'd acquired because the USB enclosures were too small.


--
Drew

"Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood."
--Marie Curie
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