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-   -   boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk (http://www.linux-archive.org/centos/401804-boot-process-glitch-due-missing-2nd-disk.html)

Dave 07-20-2010 06:56 PM

boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk
 
I just installed centos on a Dell that used to have 2 internal disks, but I removed one just before the install. Now when I boot it, it stops and outputs a message complaining about the missing disk and I have to hit F1 to get it to continue booting.


Is there some bios setting that is causing this? Obviously, I'd like it to just forget about the missing disk and go ahead and boot with just one, the one that was present when I installed the OS. I want to RTFM, but I'm not really certain where to start, it's outside my comfort zone.


mahalo,
Dave

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Matt 07-20-2010 07:02 PM

boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk
 
> I just installed centos on a Dell that used to have 2 internal disks, but I
> removed one just before the install. Now when I boot it, it stops and
> outputs a message complaining about the missing disk and I have to hit F1 to
> get it to continue booting.
>
> Is there some bios setting that is causing this? Obviously, I'd like it to
> just forget about the missing disk and go ahead and boot with just one, the
> one that was present when I installed the OS. I want to RTFM, but I'm not
> really certain where to start, it's outside my comfort zone.

Did you check: /etc/fstab

Matt
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Robert Heller 07-20-2010 07:09 PM

boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk
 
At Tue, 20 Jul 2010 08:56:16 -1000 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
>
>
> I just installed centos on a Dell that used to have 2 internal disks, but I
> removed one just before the install. Now when I boot it, it stops and
> outputs a message complaining about the missing disk and I have to hit F1 to
> get it to continue booting.
>
> Is there some bios setting that is causing this? Obviously, I'd like it to
> just forget about the missing disk and go ahead and boot with just one, the
> one that was present when I installed the OS. I want to RTFM, but I'm not
> really certain where to start, it's outside my comfort zone.

Dell servers seem to be wonky about this sort of thing (older ones would
not boot without a keyboard installed, even if they were esentually
'headless'). I am not sure how to deal with this. It seems to be a
Dell-specific BIOS hack of some sort (and a *dumb* one at that).

>
> mahalo,
> Dave
>
> MIME-Version: 1.0
>
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> CentOS mailing list
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> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
>

--
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Deepwoods Software -- Download the Model Railroad System
http://www.deepsoft.com/ -- Binaries for Linux and MS-Windows
heller@deepsoft.com -- http://www.deepsoft.com/ModelRailroadSystem/

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07-20-2010 07:31 PM

boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk
 
Robert Heller wrote:
> At Tue, 20 Jul 2010 08:56:16 -1000 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org>
> wrote:
>>
>> I just installed centos on a Dell that used to have 2 internal disks,
>> but I removed one just before the install. Now when I boot it, it stops
and
>> outputs a message complaining about the missing disk and I have to hit
>> F1 to get it to continue booting.
>>
>> Is there some bios setting that is causing this? Obviously, I'd like it
<snip>
> Dell servers seem to be wonky about this sort of thing (older ones would
> not boot without a keyboard installed, even if they were esentually
> 'headless'). I am not sure how to deal with this. It seems to be a
> Dell-specific BIOS hack of some sort (and a *dumb* one at that).

This is not a "Dell-specific BIOS hack". Dear child, ask your folks about
PCs. I think it was only this decade that PCs would actually boot
*without* a keyboard. EVERY PC EVER MADE before would not.

mark "tease me about my age, and I'll beat you with my cane!"

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Miguel Medalha 07-20-2010 07:49 PM

boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk
 
This is not a "Dell-specific BIOS hack". Dear child, ask your folks about
PCs. I think it was only this decade that PCs would actually boot
*without* a keyboard. EVERY PC EVER MADE before would not.

Nah! Every BIOS since I remember (at least from 1990) had a choice on
the first page, Standard BIOS Setup. "Halt on all errors, Halt on
keyboard/video errors, Halt on no errors". At least these three were
always present.

Of course the default is always "Halt on all errors". Unless you modify
the settings on purpose, that's what happens.
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Lamar Owen 07-20-2010 07:50 PM

boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk
 
On Tuesday, July 20, 2010 02:56:16 pm Dave wrote:
> I just installed centos on a Dell that used to have 2 internal disks, but I
> removed one just before the install. Now when I boot it, it stops and
> outputs a message complaining about the missing disk and I have to hit F1 to
> get it to continue booting.

The answer depends on what kind of Dell this is. Is it a PowerEdge server? Some sort of embedded RAID controller (PowerEdge and Precision workstations both have those)? More information required to fully answer.

A Dimension desktop shouldn't have this issue, but a PowerEdge or Precision with PERC or CERC set up will have this issue, and you need to access the controller's setup to tell it the other disk is gone.
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Stephen Harris 07-20-2010 07:50 PM

boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk
 
On Tue, Jul 20, 2010 at 03:31:48PM -0400, m.roth@5-cent.us wrote:
> This is not a "Dell-specific BIOS hack". Dear child, ask your folks about
> PCs. I think it was only this decade that PCs would actually boot

This decade being the 2010s? :-)

> *without* a keyboard. EVERY PC EVER MADE before would not.

It's true that really old PCs couldn't boot without a keyboard which
lead to the joke
"Keyboard missing. Press F1 to continue"

However the change to the hardware to allow a keyboardless boot came in
a lot longer than a decade ago. It might have been with the 386 based
hardware, but I really can't remember. I know I had a PC built in the
90s which has a BIOS option to halt on all errors, or halt on all errors
except keyboard.

Here's a PDF from 1998 showing the option
http://www.elhvb.com/mboards/luckytech/P6BX2.pdf

I'm sure sufficient googling would find even older examples.

Of course modern PCs may not even _have_ a keyboard port; USB only!

--

rgds
Stephen
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Miguel Medalha 07-20-2010 07:52 PM

boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk
 
> This is not a "Dell-specific BIOS hack". Dear child, ask your folks about
> PCs. I think it was only this decade that PCs would actually boot
> *without* a keyboard. EVERY PC EVER MADE before would not.
>

Nah! Every BIOS since I remember (at least from 1990) had a choice on
the first page, Standard BIOS Setup. "Halt on all errors, Halt on
keyboard/video errors, Halt on no errors". At least these three were
always present.

Of course the default is always "Halt on all errors". Unless you modify
the settings on purpose, that's what happens.


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Lamar Owen 07-20-2010 08:00 PM

boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk
 
On Tuesday, July 20, 2010 03:50:39 pm Stephen Harris wrote:
> I'm sure sufficient googling would find even older examples.

Yep, especially single-board computers (typically ISA capable, but also capable of not being in a slot (like an Advantech PCA-6145 i486 board used in lots of embedded PC applications).

> Of course modern PCs may not even _have_ a keyboard port; USB only!

Some microfootprint Gateways in the Celeron 900 timeframe had USB-only for keyboard and mouse, and I still collect USB Gateway keyboards from that era that have embedded two port USB hubs, so you can plug the mouse into the keyboard and the keyboard in the system unit; this is the One True Way pioneered by Sun boxen using serial keyboards and mice, remember? (tongue firmly in cheek....). There are Dell keyboards like that, too.

Macs have been that way for years, too.
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Ron Loftin 07-20-2010 08:01 PM

boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk
 
On Tue, 2010-07-20 at 15:31 -0400, m.roth@5-cent.us wrote:
> Robert Heller wrote:
> > At Tue, 20 Jul 2010 08:56:16 -1000 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org>
> > wrote:
> >>
> >> I just installed centos on a Dell that used to have 2 internal disks,
> >> but I removed one just before the install. Now when I boot it, it stops
> and
> >> outputs a message complaining about the missing disk and I have to hit
> >> F1 to get it to continue booting.
> >>
> >> Is there some bios setting that is causing this? Obviously, I'd like it
> <snip>
> > Dell servers seem to be wonky about this sort of thing (older ones would
> > not boot without a keyboard installed, even if they were esentually
> > 'headless'). I am not sure how to deal with this. It seems to be a
> > Dell-specific BIOS hack of some sort (and a *dumb* one at that).
>
> This is not a "Dell-specific BIOS hack". Dear child, ask your folks about
> PCs. I think it was only this decade that PCs would actually boot
> *without* a keyboard. EVERY PC EVER MADE before would not.

Sorry, but I have to respectfully disagree with that statement.

I have been using "old" ( some folks might say "antique" ) desktop
machines as firewalls/fileservers for a handful of friends for the
better part of 10 years now. This goes back to old Dell GXi boxes
( Pentium 166 ) and homebuilt AMD K-6 systems. In ALL cases, I was able
to configure the BIOS settings such that the system would boot without a
keyboard connected. AFAIR all of those systems had a single setting to
avoid a halt of the boot process because of a missing keyboard, and
we're talking about BIOS versions back to around 1997.

>
> mark "tease me about my age, and I'll beat you with my cane!"
>
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--
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"God, root, what is difference ?" Piter from UserFriendly

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