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Old 07-20-2010, 08:26 PM
Robert Heller
 
Default boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk

At Tue, 20 Jul 2010 20:49:23 +0100 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
>
> This is not a "Dell-specific BIOS hack". Dear child, ask your folks about
> PCs. I think it was only this decade that PCs would actually boot
> *without* a keyboard. EVERY PC EVER MADE before would not.
>
> Nah! Every BIOS since I remember (at least from 1990) had a choice on
> the first page, Standard BIOS Setup. "Halt on all errors, Halt on
> keyboard/video errors, Halt on no errors". At least these three were
> always present.
>
> Of course the default is always "Halt on all errors". Unless you modify
> the settings on purpose, that's what happens.

And some *early* Dell *servers* (*late* 1990s -- 1998 or so), would
*always* halt on keyboard errors, with no option to suppress this.

> _______________________________________________
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> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
>

--
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933
Deepwoods Software -- Download the Model Railroad System
http://www.deepsoft.com/ -- Binaries for Linux and MS-Windows
heller@deepsoft.com -- http://www.deepsoft.com/ModelRailroadSystem/
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Old 07-20-2010, 08:26 PM
Robert Heller
 
Default boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk

At Tue, 20 Jul 2010 15:31:48 -0400 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
> Robert Heller wrote:
> > At Tue, 20 Jul 2010 08:56:16 -1000 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org>
> > wrote:
> >>
> >> I just installed centos on a Dell that used to have 2 internal disks,
> >> but I removed one just before the install. Now when I boot it, it stops
> and
> >> outputs a message complaining about the missing disk and I have to hit
> >> F1 to get it to continue booting.
> >>
> >> Is there some bios setting that is causing this? Obviously, I'd like it
> <snip>
> > Dell servers seem to be wonky about this sort of thing (older ones would
> > not boot without a keyboard installed, even if they were esentually
> > 'headless'). I am not sure how to deal with this. It seems to be a
> > Dell-specific BIOS hack of some sort (and a *dumb* one at that).
>
> This is not a "Dell-specific BIOS hack". Dear child, ask your folks about
> PCs. I think it was only this decade that PCs would actually boot
> *without* a keyboard. EVERY PC EVER MADE before would not.

Almost *ALL* PCs *I've* ever dealt with had an 'Halt on no error' BIOS
option, going back well into the early '90s. Yes, it would complain
that there was no keyboard, but would boot anyway. The Dell 'server' I
dealt with could be set to 'Halt on no error' (I think), but would
still refuse to boot unless I keyboard was attached.

>
> mark "tease me about my age, and I'll beat you with my cane!"
>
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
>

--
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933
Deepwoods Software -- Download the Model Railroad System
http://www.deepsoft.com/ -- Binaries for Linux and MS-Windows
heller@deepsoft.com -- http://www.deepsoft.com/ModelRailroadSystem/

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Old 07-20-2010, 08:26 PM
Robert Heller
 
Default boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk

At Tue, 20 Jul 2010 15:50:34 -0400 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
> On Tuesday, July 20, 2010 02:56:16 pm Dave wrote:
> > I just installed centos on a Dell that used to have 2 internal disks, but I
> > removed one just before the install. Now when I boot it, it stops and
> > outputs a message complaining about the missing disk and I have to hit F1 to
> > get it to continue booting.
>
> The answer depends on what kind of Dell this is. Is it a PowerEdge server? Some sort of embedded RAID controller (PowerEdge and Precision workstations both have those)? More information required to fully answer.
>
> A Dimension desktop shouldn't have this issue, but a PowerEdge or Precision with PERC or CERC set up will have this issue, and you need to access the controller's setup to tell it the other disk is gone.

A PowerEdge with plain old SATA disks will complain about a missing disk
as well -- we had a disk die and everytime it booted while we waited for
the replacement it would stop complaining that the disk was missing (we
had software RAID and were able to stay up with a 'degraded' RAID set
for the week or so it took to get the replacemnt).


> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
>

--
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933
Deepwoods Software -- Download the Model Railroad System
http://www.deepsoft.com/ -- Binaries for Linux and MS-Windows
heller@deepsoft.com -- http://www.deepsoft.com/ModelRailroadSystem/

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Old 07-20-2010, 08:40 PM
JohnS
 
Default boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk

On Tue, 2010-07-20 at 16:26 -0400, Robert Heller wrote:

>
> A PowerEdge with plain old SATA disks will complain about a missing disk
> as well -- we had a disk die and everytime it booted while we waited for
> the replacement it would stop complaining that the disk was missing (we
> had software RAID and were able to stay up with a 'degraded' RAID set
> for the week or so it took to get the replacemnt).
---
Which makes me wonder why would you ever shut it down in the first
place? I sure would not wait a week on a disk replacement much less
more than 24 hours.

John

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Old 07-20-2010, 09:30 PM
Dave
 
Default boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk

On Tue, Jul 20, 2010 at 9:50 AM, Lamar Owen <lowen@pari.edu> wrote:

The answer depends on what kind of Dell this is. *Is it a PowerEdge server? *Some sort of embedded RAID controller (PowerEdge and Precision workstations both have those)? More information required to fully answer.

Precision WorkStation 490.
Dave

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Old 07-20-2010, 09:34 PM
Dave
 
Default boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk

Thanks for all the discussion, but keyboard is not the issue.

I guess I should edit the bios settings and look for a way to tell it "hey, you've only got one disk now, be happy."
best,
Dave

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Old 07-20-2010, 09:38 PM
Joshua Baker-LePain
 
Default boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk

On Tue, 20 Jul 2010 at 11:34am, Dave wrote

> Thanks for all the discussion, but keyboard is not the issue.
>
> I guess I should edit the bios settings and look for a way to tell it "hey,
> you've only got one disk now, be happy."

All Dell desktops I've dealt with (including the Precision T3400 I use
now) require you to go into the BIOS and explicitly tell you which busses
(IDE before, SATA now) have disks attached to them. If you don't tell it
about a disk you do have, the disk won't appear to the OS. And if you do
tell it about a disk you don't have, then the boot will hang complaining
about a missing disk. It's asinine and I've never seen any other BIOS
like it. But it's consistent. I've never dealt with Dell's server
hardware, so I have on idea if they do the same thing there (dear God I
hope not).

In any case, yes, you must go into the BIOS and explicitly enumerate your
disks there.

--
Joshua Baker-LePain
QB3 Shared Cluster Sysadmin
UCSF
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Old 07-20-2010, 10:26 PM
Bob McConnell
 
Default boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk

Stephen Harris wrote:
> On Tue, Jul 20, 2010 at 03:31:48PM -0400, m.roth@5-cent.us wrote:
>> This is not a "Dell-specific BIOS hack". Dear child, ask your folks about
>> PCs. I think it was only this decade that PCs would actually boot
>
> This decade being the 2010s? :-)

The calendar is '1' based. 2010 is the last year of the first decade in
the 21st century.

Bob McConnell
N2SPP

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Old 07-21-2010, 12:08 AM
Robert Heller
 
Default boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk

At Tue, 20 Jul 2010 16:40:25 -0400 CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
>
> On Tue, 2010-07-20 at 16:26 -0400, Robert Heller wrote:
>
> >
> > A PowerEdge with plain old SATA disks will complain about a missing disk
> > as well -- we had a disk die and everytime it booted while we waited for
> > the replacement it would stop complaining that the disk was missing (we
> > had software RAID and were able to stay up with a 'degraded' RAID set
> > for the week or so it took to get the replacemnt).
> ---
> Which makes me wonder why would you ever shut it down in the first
> place? I sure would not wait a week on a disk replacement much less
> more than 24 hours.

First of all WD was not going to send us a new disk unless we sent the
old one in first -- the disks are not in hot swap bays, so I had
'remove' the bad disk from the RAID sets and shut down the machine to
remove it.

Second, we had a couple of power failures (yes, we have a UPS, but that
is only good enough for a graceful shutdown, not for an extended power
outage).

The machine was only shutdown because we *had* to shut it down.

The server is not a 'critical' server, in the sense that it has to have
near 100% uptime. It is not public facing server in that sense.

>
> John
>
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
>

--
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933
Deepwoods Software -- Download the Model Railroad System
http://www.deepsoft.com/ -- Binaries for Linux and MS-Windows
heller@deepsoft.com -- http://www.deepsoft.com/ModelRailroadSystem/

_______________________________________________
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Old 07-21-2010, 12:08 AM
Robert Heller
 
Default boot process glitch due to missing 2nd disk

At Tue, 20 Jul 2010 17:38:32 -0400 (EDT) CentOS mailing list <centos@centos.org> wrote:

>
> On Tue, 20 Jul 2010 at 11:34am, Dave wrote
>
> > Thanks for all the discussion, but keyboard is not the issue.
> >
> > I guess I should edit the bios settings and look for a way to tell it "hey,
> > you've only got one disk now, be happy."
>
> All Dell desktops I've dealt with (including the Precision T3400 I use
> now) require you to go into the BIOS and explicitly tell you which busses
> (IDE before, SATA now) have disks attached to them. If you don't tell it
> about a disk you do have, the disk won't appear to the OS. And if you do
> tell it about a disk you don't have, then the boot will hang complaining
> about a missing disk. It's asinine and I've never seen any other BIOS
> like it. But it's consistent. I've never dealt with Dell's server
> hardware, so I have on idea if they do the same thing there (dear God I
> hope not).

'Little' Dell PowerEdge servers with plain (non-RAID) SATA disks
appearently work that way too (same BIOS stupidity I guess). Once they
see a disk, they assume it will *always* be there. If you pull the
disk for some reason (disk failure for example), it complains about a
missing disk. *I* didn't bother looking in the BIOS to shut it up,
since I planned on replacing the missing disk in a week or so anyway
(just a matter of waiting on WD and UPS...)

>
> In any case, yes, you must go into the BIOS and explicitly enumerate your
> disks there.
>

--
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933
Deepwoods Software -- Download the Model Railroad System
http://www.deepsoft.com/ -- Binaries for Linux and MS-Windows
heller@deepsoft.com -- http://www.deepsoft.com/ModelRailroadSystem/

_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
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http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 

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