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Old 03-10-2010, 12:11 AM
Ski Dawg
 
Default IPSec VPN Setup?

Hello Everyone,

I have been tasked at work with setting up a VPN connection from our
server to a client's network. The only problem is that I have never
done anything like this before, so I am not sure where to start.

We are running CentOS 5.4 on our server. I do not yet know what the
client is running for their VPN, the only thing I know of from the
client, is we need to use IPSec for our VPN connection to them. I have
been googling, and have found quite a bit of information, but it is a
little overwhelming, as I am new to setting up a VPN. Is the a
"standard" method for doing this sort of setup that I am missing so
far?

If anyone has any quick pointers to get me started, that would be
greatly appreciated.
--
Doug

Registered Linux User #285548 (http://counter.li.org)
----------------------------------------
Never trust a computer you can't throw out a window.
-- Steve Wozniak
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 03-10-2010, 06:08 AM
"Geoff Galitz"
 
Default IPSec VPN Setup?

I use Openswan regularly for IPSec VPN connections to remote sites.
Although the documentation is a bit lacking it is pretty easy to get going
once you've played with it a bit.

It is reliable, widely available and the openswan users support list is
responsive.

If you have trouble connecting to the remote side, ike-scan can help in
getting your key exchange settings right. That is usually the hard part, in
my experience.

-geoff


---------------------------------
Geoff Galitz
Blankenheim NRW, Germany
http://www.galitz.org/
http://german-way.com/blog/


> -----Original Message-----
> From: centos-bounces@centos.org [mailto:centos-bounces@centos.org] On
> Behalf Of Ski Dawg
> Sent: Mittwoch, 10. März 2010 02:12
> To: centos@centos.org
> Subject: [CentOS] IPSec VPN Setup?
>
> Hello Everyone,
>
> I have been tasked at work with setting up a VPN connection from our
> server to a client's network. The only problem is that I have never
> done anything like this before, so I am not sure where to start.
>
> We are running CentOS 5.4 on our server. I do not yet know what the
> client is running for their VPN, the only thing I know of from the
> client, is we need to use IPSec for our VPN connection to them. I have
> been googling, and have found quite a bit of information, but it is a
> little overwhelming, as I am new to setting up a VPN. Is the a
> "standard" method for doing this sort of setup that I am missing so
> far?
>
> If anyone has any quick pointers to get me started, that would be
> greatly appreciated.
> --
> Doug
>
> Registered Linux User #285548 (http://counter.li.org)
> ----------------------------------------
> Never trust a computer you can't throw out a window.
> -- Steve Wozniak
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos

_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 03-10-2010, 07:15 AM
Jobst Schmalenbach
 
Default IPSec VPN Setup?

Hi



I can second that, Openswan is the way to go (sorry the ONLY way to go).

Centos has the latest, but I would highly recommend to have Centos on
both ends.

Centos is one of the distros that uses NSS by default and standard out
of the box, so this makes is easier.



There's also a PDF booklet (get that from amazon, its written by Paul
Wouters, one of the Openswan developers), link on the website.



The toughest part is getting the keys and connections right, personally
I would not do it without subscribing to "users@openswan.org" first,
they are helpfull and you will find Paul on the list, too.



Been using Openswan (well it used to be freeS/WAN, hence the animal
used) for many years and once you set it up and have the key exchange
working you never have to change a thing again other then (in my case)
"yum update openswan".



jobst





On 10/03/2010 18:08, Geoff Galitz wrote:



I use Openswan regularly for IPSec VPN connections to remote sites.
Although the documentation is a bit lacking it is pretty easy to get going
once you've played with it a bit.

It is reliable, widely available and the openswan users support list is
responsive.

If you have trouble connecting to the remote side, ike-scan can help in
getting your key exchange settings right. That is usually the hard part, in
my experience.

-geoff


---------------------------------
Geoff Galitz
Blankenheim NRW, Germany
http://www.galitz.org/
http://german-way.com/blog/




-----Original Message-----
From: centos-bounces@centos.org [mailto:centos-bounces@centos.org] On
Behalf Of Ski Dawg
Sent: Mittwoch, 10. März 2010 02:12
To: centos@centos.org
Subject: [CentOS] IPSec VPN Setup?

Hello Everyone,

I have been tasked at work with setting up a VPN connection from our
server to a client's network. The only problem is that I have never
done anything like this before, so I am not sure where to start.

We are running CentOS 5.4 on our server. I do not yet know what the
client is running for their VPN, the only thing I know of from the
client, is we need to use IPSec for our VPN connection to them. I have
been googling, and have found quite a bit of information, but it is a
little overwhelming, as I am new to setting up a VPN. Is the a
"standard" method for doing this sort of setup that I am missing so
far?

If anyone has any quick pointers to get me started, that would be
greatly appreciated.
--
Doug

Registered Linux User #285548 (http://counter.li.org)
----------------------------------------
Never trust a computer you can't throw out a window.
-- Steve Wozniak
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos



_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos




--






Jobst
Schmalenbach

General Manager, Webdevelopment and Tech Support



P**+61 3 9532 7677

M*+61 411 611 855

E**jhs@barrett.com.au

W*www.barrett.com.au











Everybody lives by selling something

Sales Training, Consulting, Coaching, Seminars and Resources



Barrett Sales Blog

Subscribe to receive free weekly
advice and tips for people who live by selling something
















_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 03-10-2010, 03:56 PM
Ski Dawg
 
Default IPSec VPN Setup?

Geoff and Jobst,
Thanks for the reply. I will investigate openswan further.--
Doug

Registered Linux User #285548 (http://counter.li.org)


----------------------------------------
Never trust a computer you can't throw out a window.
* -- Steve Wozniak



On Wed, Mar 10, 2010 at 1:15 AM, Jobst Schmalenbach <jobst@barrett.com.au> wrote:








Hi



I can second that, Openswan is the way to go (sorry the ONLY way to go).

Centos has the latest, but I would highly recommend to have Centos on
both ends.

Centos is one of the distros that uses NSS by default and standard out
of the box, so this makes is easier.



There's also a PDF booklet (get that from amazon, its written by Paul
Wouters, one of the Openswan developers), link on the website.



The toughest part is getting the keys and connections right, personally
I would not do it without subscribing to "users@openswan.org" first,
they are helpfull and you will find Paul on the list, too.



Been using Openswan (well it used to be freeS/WAN, hence the animal
used) for many years and once you set it up and have the key exchange
working you never have to change a thing again other then (in my case)
"yum update openswan".



jobst





On 10/03/2010 18:08, Geoff Galitz wrote:

I use Openswan regularly for IPSec VPN connections to remote sites.
Although the documentation is a bit lacking it is pretty easy to get going
once you've played with it a bit.

It is reliable, widely available and the openswan users support list is
responsive.

If you have trouble connecting to the remote side, ike-scan can help in
getting your key exchange settings right. That is usually the hard part, in
my experience.

-geoff


---------------------------------
Geoff Galitz
Blankenheim NRW, Germany
http://www.galitz.org/
http://german-way.com/blog/




-----Original Message-----
From: centos-bounces@centos.org [mailto:centos-bounces@centos.org] On
Behalf Of Ski Dawg
Sent: Mittwoch, 10. März 2010 02:12
To: centos@centos.org
Subject: [CentOS] IPSec VPN Setup?

Hello Everyone,

I have been tasked at work with setting up a VPN connection from our
server to a client's network. The only problem is that I have never
done anything like this before, so I am not sure where to start.

We are running CentOS 5.4 on our server. I do not yet know what the
client is running for their VPN, the only thing I know of from the
client, is we need to use IPSec for our VPN connection to them. I have
been googling, and have found quite a bit of information, but it is a
little overwhelming, as I am new to setting up a VPN. Is the a
"standard" method for doing this sort of setup that I am missing so
far?

If anyone has any quick pointers to get me started, that would be
greatly appreciated.
--
Doug

Registered Linux User #285548 (http://counter.li.org)
----------------------------------------
Never trust a computer you can't throw out a window.
-- Steve Wozniak
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos


_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos




--






Jobst
Schmalenbach

General Manager, Webdevelopment and Tech Support



P**+61 3 9532 7677

M*+61 411 611 855

E**jhs@barrett.com.au

W*www.barrett.com.au











Everybody lives by selling something

Sales Training, Consulting, Coaching, Seminars and Resources



Barrett Sales Blog

Subscribe to receive free weekly
advice and tips for people who live by selling something

















_______________________________________________

CentOS mailing list

CentOS@centos.org

http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos




_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 03-10-2010, 04:03 PM
Boris Epstein
 
Default IPSec VPN Setup?

On Wed, Mar 10, 2010 at 3:15 AM, Jobst Schmalenbach
<jobst@barrett.com.au> wrote:
>
> Hi
>
> I can second that, Openswan is the way to go (sorry the ONLY way to go).
> Centos has the latest, but I would highly recommend to have Centos on both ends.
> Centos is one of the distros that uses NSS by default and standard out of the box, so this makes is easier.
>
> There's also a PDF booklet (get that from amazon, its written by Paul Wouters, one of the Openswan developers), link on the website.
>
> The toughest part is getting the keys and connections right, personally I would not do it without subscribing to "users@openswan.org" first, they are helpfull and you will find Paul on the list, too.
>
> Been using Openswan (well it used to be freeS/WAN, hence the animal used) for many years and once you set it up and have the key exchange working you never have to change a thing again other then (in my case) "yum update openswan".
>
> jobst
>
>
> On 10/03/2010 18:08, Geoff Galitz wrote:
>
> I use Openswan regularly for IPSec VPN connections to remote sites.
> Although the documentation is a bit lacking it is pretty easy to get going
> once you've played with it a bit.
>
> It is reliable, widely available and the openswan users support list is
> responsive.
>
> If you have trouble connecting to the remote side, ike-scan can help in
> getting your key exchange settings right. That is usually the hard part, in
> my experience.
>
> -geoff
>
>
> ---------------------------------
> Geoff Galitz
> Blankenheim NRW, Germany
> http://www.galitz.org/
> http://german-way.com/blog/
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: centos-bounces@centos.org [mailto:centos-bounces@centos.org] On
> Behalf Of Ski Dawg
> Sent: Mittwoch, 10. März 2010 02:12
> To: centos@centos.org
> Subject: [CentOS] IPSec VPN Setup?
>
> Hello Everyone,
>
> I have been tasked at work with setting up a VPN connection from our
> server to a client's network. The only problem is that I have never
> done anything like this before, so I am not sure where to start.
>
> We are running CentOS 5.4 on our server. I do not yet know what the
> client is running for their VPN, the only thing I know of from the
> client, is we need to use IPSec for our VPN connection to them. I have
> been googling, and have found quite a bit of information, but it is a
> little overwhelming, as I am new to setting up a VPN. Is the a
> "standard" method for doing this sort of setup that I am missing so
> far?
>
> If anyone has any quick pointers to get me started, that would be
> greatly appreciated.
> --
> Doug
>
> Registered Linux User #285548 (http://counter.li.org)
> ----------------------------------------
> Never trust a computer you can't throw out a window.
> -- Steve Wozniak
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
>
> --
> Jobst Schmalenbach
> General Manager, Webdevelopment and Tech Support
> P**+61 3 9532 7677
> M*+61 411 611 855
> E**jhs@barrett.com.au
> W*www.barrett.com.au
>
> Everybody lives by selling something
> Sales Training, Consulting, Coaching, Seminars and Resources
> Barrett Sales Blog
> Subscribe to receive free weekly advice and tips for people who live by selling something
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>

I run a VPN server using OpenVPN. Looks like pretty robust technology to me.

Boris.
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 03-10-2010, 04:07 PM
Eero Volotinen
 
Default IPSec VPN Setup?

> I run a VPN server using OpenVPN. Looks like pretty robust technology to me.

but openvpn is not ipsec.

openvpn works fine under windos 7, osx and linux. easy to setup also.

--
Eero
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 03-10-2010, 04:13 PM
Boris Epstein
 
Default IPSec VPN Setup?

On Wed, Mar 10, 2010 at 12:07 PM, Eero Volotinen <eero.volotinen@iki.fi> wrote:
>> I run a VPN server using OpenVPN. Looks like pretty robust technology to me.
>
> but openvpn is not ipsec.
>

Good point. Sorry, my fault, I just wasn't paying attention.

Boris.
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 03-10-2010, 04:43 PM
Ski Dawg
 
Default IPSec VPN Setup?

Boris,

Thanks for the reply. I was originally going to look into using
openvpn, but then found out that the client requires the use of ipsec
for the vpn connection, so I am investigating other options.
--
Doug

Registered Linux User #285548 (http://counter.li.org)
----------------------------------------
Never trust a computer you can't throw out a window.
-- Steve Wozniak



On Wed, Mar 10, 2010 at 10:03 AM, Boris Epstein <borepstein@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Wed, Mar 10, 2010 at 3:15 AM, Jobst Schmalenbach
> <jobst@barrett.com.au> wrote:
>>
>> Hi
>>
>> I can second that, Openswan is the way to go (sorry the ONLY way to go).
>> Centos has the latest, but I would highly recommend to have Centos on both ends.
>> Centos is one of the distros that uses NSS by default and standard out of the box, so this makes is easier.
>>
>> There's also a PDF booklet (get that from amazon, its written by Paul Wouters, one of the Openswan developers), link on the website.
>>
>> The toughest part is getting the keys and connections right, personally I would not do it without subscribing to "users@openswan.org" first, they are helpfull and you will find Paul on the list, too.
>>
>> Been using Openswan (well it used to be freeS/WAN, hence the animal used) for many years and once you set it up and have the key exchange working you never have to change a thing again other then (in my case) "yum update openswan".
>>
>> jobst
>>
>>
>> On 10/03/2010 18:08, Geoff Galitz wrote:
>>
>> I use Openswan regularly for IPSec VPN connections to remote sites.
>> Although the documentation is a bit lacking it is pretty easy to get going
>> once you've played with it a bit.
>>
>> It is reliable, widely available and the openswan users support list is
>> responsive.
>>
>> If you have trouble connecting to the remote side, ike-scan can help in
>> getting your key exchange settings right. *That is usually the hard part, in
>> my experience.
>>
>> -geoff
>>
>>
>> ---------------------------------
>> Geoff Galitz
>> Blankenheim NRW, Germany
>> http://www.galitz.org/
>> http://german-way.com/blog/
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: centos-bounces@centos.org [mailto:centos-bounces@centos.org] On
>> Behalf Of Ski Dawg
>> Sent: Mittwoch, 10. März 2010 02:12
>> To: centos@centos.org
>> Subject: [CentOS] IPSec VPN Setup?
>>
>> Hello Everyone,
>>
>> I have been tasked at work with setting up a VPN connection from our
>> server to a client's network. The only problem is that I have never
>> done anything like this before, so I am not sure where to start.
>>
>> We are running CentOS 5.4 on our server. I do not yet know what the
>> client is running for their VPN, the only thing I know of from the
>> client, is we need to use IPSec for our VPN connection to them. I have
>> been googling, and have found quite a bit of information, but it is a
>> little overwhelming, as I am new to setting up a VPN. Is the a
>> "standard" method for doing this sort of setup that I am missing so
>> far?
>>
>> If anyone has any quick pointers to get me started, that would be
>> greatly appreciated.
>> --
>> Doug
>>
>> Registered Linux User #285548 (http://counter.li.org)
>> ----------------------------------------
>> Never trust a computer you can't throw out a window.
>> * *-- Steve Wozniak
>> _______________________________________________
>> CentOS mailing list
>> CentOS@centos.org
>> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> CentOS mailing list
>> CentOS@centos.org
>> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>>
>>
>> --
>> Jobst Schmalenbach
>> General Manager, Webdevelopment and Tech Support
>> P**+61 3 9532 7677
>> M*+61 411 611 855
>> E**jhs@barrett.com.au
>> W*www.barrett.com.au
>>
>> Everybody lives by selling something
>> Sales Training, Consulting, Coaching, Seminars and Resources
>> Barrett Sales Blog
>> Subscribe to receive free weekly advice and tips for people who live by selling something
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> CentOS mailing list
>> CentOS@centos.org
>> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>>
>
> I run a VPN server using OpenVPN. Looks like pretty robust technology to me.
>
> Boris.
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 

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