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Old 01-26-2009, 06:14 PM
Ugo Bellavance
 
Default Backup methods for an Oracle DB

Hi,

I've been testing different methods and I'd like to have some advice.
I want to perform a cold backup once a week on the Oracle DB, and put it
on tape. I'm using EMC Networker for backup software, and I am not too
at ease with the fact of doing eveything with Networker, because if
there is a problem with the backup, the Oracle DB might not come up
after the backup run.

So I thought of using disk-based backup. I've tried scp'ing the files
directly to my backup server, but the operation is too long (120 min).
I tried generating a tar.gz directly to my backup server via SSH. A
decent 40 minutes, using mgzip (multi-thread gzip), 70 Gigs. 120
minutes for a tar.bz2, using pbzip2 (parralel bzip2) (54 Gigs). A tar
sent directly to my backup server is quite huge (318 Gigs). It is then
taken to tape on the regular nightly backup.

My concerns are:

- Time needed to perform backup (downtime).
- Time needed to do a recovery.

For the backup, sending a tar.gz directly to the backup server seems to
be the best option. However, since I want to minimize the time needed
to perform a recovery, I'd like to have raw files on tape, not in a
tarball and not compressed (the tape is compressing anyway).

Up to now, I've been quite disappointed by the speed at which my backup
server can decompress and untar, and this server has quite good
hardware. When I use iostat -x, I find that the %util of the device is
averaging 80%.

Here is the hardware involved:

Oracle Server:

HP Proliant 380DL + MSA70
16 GB ram
2 x Quad-core Xeons E5345 2.33 Ghz
9 RAID 10 volumes on 32 72G, 15K rpm SAS disks
1X Smart Array P400 w/512 MB BBU
1X Smart Array P800 w/512 MB BBU

Database Server

HP Proliant 360DL
2 x Quad-core Xeons E5345 2.33 Ghz
1 RAID 5 volume on 6 146 GB, 10K rpm SAS disks
1X Smart Array P400 w/512 MB BBU

Any help or suggestions welcome.

Regards,

Ugo

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Old 01-26-2009, 06:25 PM
"nate"
 
Default Backup methods for an Oracle DB

Ugo Bellavance wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I've been testing different methods and I'd like to have some advice.
> I want to perform a cold backup once a week on the Oracle DB, and put it
> on tape. I'm using EMC Networker for backup software, and I am not too
> at ease with the fact of doing eveything with Networker, because if
> there is a problem with the backup, the Oracle DB might not come up
> after the backup run.

What version and edition of Oracle?

Use RMAN, that's what it's there for. You can backup online, or
offline, full or incremental.

At my last company we ran Oracle 10gR2 standard edition connected to
a small fiber channel SAN. I wrote a script that put the tables on the
primary server in hotbackup mode, then snapshotted the Oracle volumes,
and mounted the snapshots onto a virtual machine that was running
software iSCSI. From there a job kicked off and ran RMAN to backup
the database.

Prior to that we ran enterprise edition and was able to run RMAN
directly from the physical standby server. With standard edition
you can't do that.

The migration from Oracle EE to Oracle SE probably paid for the
SAN in itself let alone the massive increases in productivity
gained by the flexibility of a centralized storage system(copying
production data went from ~2 days to about 1 hour, copying data
to reporting database went from ~8 hours to ~10 minutes).

You can also run RMAN against the primary system as well(any edition
I believe), though I didn't want to do that as it'd impact
performance.

nate


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Old 01-26-2009, 06:56 PM
Ugo Bellavance
 
Default Backup methods for an Oracle DB

nate a écrit :
> Ugo Bellavance wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I've been testing different methods and I'd like to have some advice.
>> I want to perform a cold backup once a week on the Oracle DB, and put it
>> on tape. I'm using EMC Networker for backup software, and I am not too
>> at ease with the fact of doing eveything with Networker, because if
>> there is a problem with the backup, the Oracle DB might not come up
>> after the backup run.
>
> What version and edition of Oracle?

Oracle Database 10g Enterprise Edition Release 10.2.x.x.x - 64bit Production
With the Partitioning and Data Mining options

> Use RMAN, that's what it's there for. You can backup online, or
> offline, full or incremental.

Well, we only use one main oracle server... the DBA says it is not worth
the additionnal overhead. I'm no Oracle guru.

> At my last company we ran Oracle 10gR2 standard edition connected to
> a small fiber channel SAN. I wrote a script that put the tables on the
> primary server in hotbackup mode, then snapshotted the Oracle volumes,
> and mounted the snapshots onto a virtual machine that was running
> software iSCSI. From there a job kicked off and ran RMAN to backup
> the database.

Ok, but is that the equivalent of doing a cold backup?

> Prior to that we ran enterprise edition and was able to run RMAN
> directly from the physical standby server. With standard edition
> you can't do that.

Ok

> The migration from Oracle EE to Oracle SE probably paid for the
> SAN in itself let alone the massive increases in productivity
> gained by the flexibility of a centralized storage system(copying
> production data went from ~2 days to about 1 hour, copying data
> to reporting database went from ~8 hours to ~10 minutes).
>
> You can also run RMAN against the primary system as well(any edition
> I believe), though I didn't want to do that as it'd impact
> performance.

We don't really care about the performance, as we are ok with up to
about 2 hours of complete downtime per week.

Thanks,

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Old 01-26-2009, 07:10 PM
"nate"
 
Default Backup methods for an Oracle DB

Ugo Bellavance wrote:
> nate a écrit :
>> Ugo Bellavance wrote:
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> I've been testing different methods and I'd like to have some advice.
>>> I want to perform a cold backup once a week on the Oracle DB, and put it
>>> on tape. I'm using EMC Networker for backup software, and I am not too
>>> at ease with the fact of doing eveything with Networker, because if
>>> there is a problem with the backup, the Oracle DB might not come up
>>> after the backup run.
>>
>> What version and edition of Oracle?
>
> Oracle Database 10g Enterprise Edition Release 10.2.x.x.x - 64bit Production
> With the Partitioning and Data Mining options
>
>> Use RMAN, that's what it's there for. You can backup online, or
>> offline, full or incremental.
>
> Well, we only use one main oracle server... the DBA says it is not worth
> the additionnal overhead. I'm no Oracle guru.
>
>> At my last company we ran Oracle 10gR2 standard edition connected to
>> a small fiber channel SAN. I wrote a script that put the tables on the
>> primary server in hotbackup mode, then snapshotted the Oracle volumes,
>> and mounted the snapshots onto a virtual machine that was running
>> software iSCSI. From there a job kicked off and ran RMAN to backup
>> the database.
>
> Ok, but is that the equivalent of doing a cold backup?

That is enough to restore from a blank database.

Since your using enterprise edition, you can even adjust the number
of workers that RMAN uses(increases/decreases throughput assuming
your not totally I/O bound) to throttle it.

The upside with RMAN is you can backup without downtime(though
depending on size of the DB you probably can't backup without some
sort of impact to the primary). And I believe it's the only really
truly supported method of backing up an Oracle DB. (data pump has it's
problems and backing up raw data files is questionable as well).

I haven't gone through it but this looks informative:
http://blogs.oracle.com/AlejandroVargas/gems/RmanHandsOn.pdf

nate



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