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Old 11-25-2008, 06:45 AM
"Thomas Iverson"
 
Default adduser vs. useradd

On Tue, Nov 25, 2008 at 3:28 PM, Niki Kovacs <contact@kikinovak.net> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> To add a user to the system on the commandline, I usually use the adduser
> command.
>
> # adduser newuser
>
> And that's it. I've been using that command probably out of an old habit,
> since I've been a long-time Slackware user before. But now I wanted to dig a
> bit deeper, and some details puzzle me.
>
> Whereas on Slackware, 'adduser' is an interactive shell script to create a
> user so that basically you don't have to memorize all the 'useradd'
> switches, CentOS' 'adduser' is a mere symbolic link to 'useradd'.
>
> But when I add a new user (# adduser newuser), I don't use any switches, say
> to specify the shell, the home directory, the password expiration delay,
> etcetera. I understand that it is Red Hat (CentOS) tradition to create a
> separate group for each user. For example, user kikinovak also belongs to a
> group kikinovak. And when I create a new user 'newuser', the 'newuser' group
> also got somehow created. Plus, the new user also seems to have his own user
> profile, with a default .bashrc and so on. My only explanation for that is
> that CentOS' 'useradd' command doesn't work like the traditional UNIX
> useradd command and uses a few switches by default. Please correct me if I'm
> wrong.
>
> Any light on this?
>
> Niki
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>

Hi there , you are almost right
adduser is only a symbol-link of the useradd in CentOS , for my
explanation , it may be security-related
you know , to use useradd , you can also specify the home dir,group
and so on , but script codes have danger
adduser under some distros such as archlinux,slackware is a
bash-script , so if you think it's more convenient to use a
user-friendly adduser written in bash , you can do it yourself , but
before that you should know exactly how to create a new user without
useradd-like utilities

Cheers

--
Keep It Simple Stupid
Thomas X. Iverson
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http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 11-25-2008, 07:26 AM
Niki Kovacs
 
Default adduser vs. useradd

Thomas Iverson a écrit :

Hi there , you are almost right
adduser is only a symbol-link of the useradd in CentOS , for my
explanation , it may be security-related
you know , to use useradd , you can also specify the home dir,group
and so on , but script codes have danger
adduser under some distros such as archlinux,slackware is a
bash-script , so if you think it's more convenient to use a
user-friendly adduser written in bash , you can do it yourself , but
before that you should know exactly how to create a new user without
useradd-like utilities


Hi,

I just found a copy of "RHEL 5 Unleashed", and there's a very clear
chapter about local user management, which explains Red Hat's specific
use of 'useradd', especially default options.


Cheers,

Niki
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Old 11-25-2008, 07:33 AM
"Thomas Iverson"
 
Default adduser vs. useradd

On Tue, Nov 25, 2008 at 4:26 PM, Niki Kovacs <contact@kikinovak.net> wrote:
> Thomas Iverson a écrit :
>>
>> Hi there , you are almost right
>> adduser is only a symbol-link of the useradd in CentOS , for my
>> explanation , it may be security-related
>> you know , to use useradd , you can also specify the home dir,group
>> and so on , but script codes have danger
>> adduser under some distros such as archlinux,slackware is a
>> bash-script , so if you think it's more convenient to use a
>> user-friendly adduser written in bash , you can do it yourself , but
>> before that you should know exactly how to create a new user without
>> useradd-like utilities
>>
> Hi,
>
> I just found a copy of "RHEL 5 Unleashed", and there's a very clear chapter
> about local user management, which explains Red Hat's specific use of
> 'useradd', especially default options.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Niki
> _______________________________________________
> CentOS mailing list
> CentOS@centos.org
> http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
>

Yeah , user management is the basis of system administration , read
the document carefully

--
Keep It Simple Stupid
Thomas X. Iverson
_______________________________________________
CentOS mailing list
CentOS@centos.org
http://lists.centos.org/mailman/listinfo/centos
 
Old 11-25-2008, 09:34 AM
Vandaman
 
Default adduser vs. useradd

Niki Kovacs wrote:

> I just found a copy of "RHEL 5 Unleashed", and
> there's a very clear chapter about local user
> management, which explains Red Hat's specific use of
> 'useradd', especially default options.
>

One of the golden rules about posting is that you should
try and do some basic research on your problem particularly
when http://www.centos.org/docs has tons of stuff. There seems
to be an influx of Slackware refugees joining the list.

Regards,
Vandaman.




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Old 11-25-2008, 04:46 PM
MHR
 
Default adduser vs. useradd

On Mon, Nov 24, 2008 at 11:28 PM, Niki Kovacs <contact@kikinovak.net> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> To add a user to the system on the commandline, I usually use the adduser
> command.
>
> # adduser newuser
>
> And that's it. I've been using that command probably out of an old habit,
> since I've been a long-time Slackware user before. But now I wanted to dig a
> bit deeper, and some details puzzle me.
>
> Whereas on Slackware, 'adduser' is an interactive shell script to create a
> user so that basically you don't have to memorize all the 'useradd'
> switches, CentOS' 'adduser' is a mere symbolic link to 'useradd'.
>

Did you try 'man adduser' or 'man useradd?' There's lots of good info there....

mhr
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