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Old 11-13-2008, 04:40 PM
Tom Brown
 
Default CPU benchmarking tools

measure your application performance. anything else is BS.



well not really as we have different CPU's from Intel and AMD and we
want to see how these benchmark without benchmarking the apps(s) as apps
are many and benchmarking them all against all the apps is not possible.


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Old 11-13-2008, 04:41 PM
"nate"
 
Default CPU benchmarking tools

Tom Brown wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> measure your application performance. anything else is BS.
>
>
> well not really as we have different CPU's from Intel and AMD and we
> want to see how these benchmark without benchmarking the apps(s) as apps
> are many and benchmarking them all against all the apps is not possible.


Look at the already prepared list of benchmark results at
www.spec.org, you may find a system that is similarly configured
to what your using.

nate

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Old 11-13-2008, 04:51 PM
Robert Moskowitz
 
Default CPU benchmarking tools

Tom Brown wrote:





measure your application performance. anything else is BS.



well not really as we have different CPU's from Intel and AMD and we
want to see how these benchmark without benchmarking the apps(s) as
apps are many and benchmarking them all against all the apps is not
possible.


In this month's IEEE Spectrum magazine there is an interesting study on
multi core CPUs and 'intensive computing' done at Sandia labs Seems like
with the current data bus architecture, 8 core is the max for data
access intensive applications like data mining. So I am thinking that if
you need to move lots of data for your applications, the CPU is not the
limiter, it is how the system moves data into and out of the CPU(s) that
needs to be considered.



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Old 11-13-2008, 09:42 PM
Tom Brown
 
Default CPU benchmarking tools

In this month's IEEE Spectrum magazine there is an interesting study
on multi core CPUs and 'intensive computing' done at Sandia labs Seems
like with the current data bus architecture, 8 core is the max for
data access intensive applications like data mining. So I am thinking
that if you need to move lots of data for your applications, the CPU
is not the limiter, it is how the system moves data into and out of
the CPU(s) that needs to be considered.


will read thanks
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Old 11-13-2008, 10:47 PM
Nifty Cluster Mitch
 
Default CPU benchmarking tools

On Thu, Nov 13, 2008 at 05:40:04PM +0000, Tom Brown wrote:
>>
>> measure your application performance. anything else is BS.
>h
> well not really as we have different CPU's from Intel and AMD and we
> want to see how these benchmark without benchmarking the apps(s) as apps
> are many and benchmarking them all against all the apps is not possible.

Published Spec benchmarks are valuable in this fuzzy context.

Once you have your application benchmarked, tools like "lmbench"
may help you understand what the win/loss keys are.

http://sourceforge.net/projects/lmbench

More important than hardware can be your choice of compiler and IO
(disk)... When looking at 'spec' benchmark results pay attention to
the choice of compiler AND the hardware bits surrounding the CPU.


--
T o m M i t c h e l l
Found me a new hat, now what?

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Old 11-13-2008, 11:59 PM
Rainer Duffner
 
Default CPU benchmarking tools

Am 13.11.2008 um 18:40 schrieb Tom Brown:






measure your application performance. anything else is BS.



well not really as we have different CPU's from Intel and AMD and we
want to see how these benchmark without benchmarking the apps(s) as
apps are many and benchmarking them all against all the apps is not
possible.





Benchmarks are worthless - your apps count.
Benchmark your applications. Period.


Rainer
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Old 11-14-2008, 01:56 PM
Tom Brown
 
Default CPU benchmarking tools

Benchmarks are worthless - your apps count.
Benchmark your applications. Period.


i dont think thats completely true as we would like to benchmark the 6
core (dunnington), intel 4 core (harpertown) vs AMD shanghai, AMD
Barcelona – as the disk / networking devices are handled by dom0, those
elements won’t be as applicable as we’re looking mostly at the hardware
enhancements in relation to page fault handling and TLB look-up speed,
that the AMD Shanghai boasts about.


We wouldn't be benching I/O as that would increase the variability,
which is why you wouldn't bother doing it; those kind of
microbenchmark's would be applicable more for physical to virtualization
microbencharks for linear regression calculations like:


U1/dom0 = c0 + c1 * M1/1 + c2 * M1/2 + ... + c11 * M1/11 etc

We're only interested in really the hardware benefits of the
virtualization techniques in relation to the different cpu type. We're
not interested exactly in the fact that it's virtualized, but knowing
it's virtualized and process x has caused an interrupt, which has
resulted in a page fault, which has made a TLB reference, which has
resulted in paging etc, and has taken X period. If the Core improvements
have said that page fault handles are processed quicker and TLB
references have increased, then you should notice a big difference
between VM1 in one environment without those to VM2 running with those
hardware enhancements.



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Old 11-14-2008, 02:32 PM
"nate"
 
Default CPU benchmarking tools

Tom Brown wrote:

> We're only interested in really the hardware benefits of the
> virtualization techniques in relation to the different cpu type.


http://www.vmware.com/products/vmmark/features.html

nate

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