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Old 11-10-2008, 08:57 PM
Phil Schaffner
 
Default Linux backup help

Kevin Kempter wrote:

Hi All;

I'm awaiting a new linux laptop that will be my primary work machine. I want
to implement a strategy that allows me as easily as possible to revert back
to a former state. My primary concern is a scenario where I apply system
updates and it breaks something that for me is critical.


I wonder if a simple rsync script would work. If so, here's what I'm thinking:

1) updates are available so I execute the rsync script which pulls any updated
files from my laptop to a backup server/drive


2) apply updates

3) if something breaks (even if I can no longer login) I boot the laptop, run
the rsync script in the opposite direction (push files from the backup drive
to the laptop)

I assume that if I were to execute step 3 above that my system would be in the
exact state that it was before I ran the updates. Is this a correct
assumption ?


Depends in part on the rsync commands, the file structure, and the order
of operations. Restoring over a running system would overwrite files
that are in use, particularly in /etc and /var - not a good idea.
Restoring from a backup of a live system would restore copies of files
that might have been in the process of being changed. Would be safer to
do this using a live CD for both the backup and the restore. Would want
to do the backup/restore on a per-filesystem basis. Assuming you have /
/boot and /home:


rsync --archive --delete --hard-links --one-file-system / /backup/laptop/

rsync --archive --delete --hard-links --one-file-system /boot/
/backup/laptop/boot/


rsync --archive --delete --hard-links --one-file-system /home/
/backup/laptop/home/


On restore would need to mount and restore / first, then mount other
partitions and restore them.



Are there better approaches ?


Perhaps using other backup tools (backuppc has been mentioned favorably
recently), but it should be workable; however, this sounds like a
time/labor-intensive approach every time there are updates, for a low
probability of fatal problems with the OS. Just backing up user files
would be a lot faster and easier.


Phil

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Old 11-10-2008, 09:27 PM
Frank Cox
 
Default Linux backup help

On Mon, 10 Nov 2008 13:26:34 -0700
Kevin Kempter <kevin@kevinkempterllc.com> wrote:

> I'm awaiting a new linux laptop that will be my primary work machine. I want
> to implement a strategy that allows me as easily as possible to revert back
> to a former state. My primary concern is a scenario where I apply system
> updates and it breaks something that for me is critical.

Have you looked at this? (I've never used it myself, yet, but it looks
interesting.)

http://www.mondorescue.org/

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Old 11-10-2008, 09:34 PM
Ned Slider
 
Default Linux backup help

Kevin Kempter wrote:

Hi All;

I'm awaiting a new linux laptop that will be my primary work machine. I want
to implement a strategy that allows me as easily as possible to revert back
to a former state. My primary concern is a scenario where I apply system
updates and it breaks something that for me is critical.


I wonder if a simple rsync script would work. If so, here's what I'm thinking:

1) updates are available so I execute the rsync script which pulls any updated
files from my laptop to a backup server/drive


2) apply updates

3) if something breaks (even if I can no longer login) I boot the laptop, run
the rsync script in the opposite direction (push files from the backup drive
to the laptop)

I assume that if I were to execute step 3 above that my system would be in the
exact state that it was before I ran the updates. Is this a correct
assumption ? Are there better approaches ?



Thanks in advance..



Taking a disk image snapshot with something like clonezilla might be an
alternative for you to consider.


http://clonezilla.org/

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Old 11-10-2008, 09:35 PM
Les Mikesell
 
Default Linux backup help

Frank Cox wrote:

On Mon, 10 Nov 2008 13:26:34 -0700
Kevin Kempter <kevin@kevinkempterllc.com> wrote:

I'm awaiting a new linux laptop that will be my primary work machine. I want
to implement a strategy that allows me as easily as possible to revert back
to a former state. My primary concern is a scenario where I apply system
updates and it breaks something that for me is critical.


Have you looked at this? (I've never used it myself, yet, but it looks
interesting.)

http://www.mondorescue.org/


Clonezilla-live would be good for this if you have space on a networked
machine to hold a compressed disk image.


http://clonezilla.org/clonezilla-live/

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Old 11-10-2008, 09:59 PM
"bruce"
 
Default Linux backup help

hi les/guys...

assume you had/have a usb/external drive that was connected to the laptop.
assume that it was also the same size (2.5") as the laptop drive... couldn't
you set up a process to do a complete rsync/backup every x hours.... of
everything on the drive in use.

this would give a complete, always available backup that would always be
right at your arms ready!!!

ok.. so what would be needed to accomplish this!!

thanks!


-----Original Message-----
From: fedora-list-bounces@redhat.com
[mailto:fedora-list-bounces@redhat.com]On Behalf Of Les Mikesell
Sent: Monday, November 10, 2008 2:36 PM
To: Community assistance, encouragement,and advice for using Fedora.
Subject: Re: Linux backup help


Frank Cox wrote:
> On Mon, 10 Nov 2008 13:26:34 -0700
> Kevin Kempter <kevin@kevinkempterllc.com> wrote:
>
>> I'm awaiting a new linux laptop that will be my primary work machine. I
want
>> to implement a strategy that allows me as easily as possible to revert
back
>> to a former state. My primary concern is a scenario where I apply system
>> updates and it breaks something that for me is critical.
>
> Have you looked at this? (I've never used it myself, yet, but it looks
> interesting.)
>
> http://www.mondorescue.org/

Clonezilla-live would be good for this if you have space on a networked
machine to hold a compressed disk image.

http://clonezilla.org/clonezilla-live/

--
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lesmikesell@gmail.com

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Old 11-10-2008, 10:28 PM
Les Mikesell
 
Default Linux backup help

bruce wrote:

hi les/guys...

assume you had/have a usb/external drive that was connected to the laptop.
assume that it was also the same size (2.5") as the laptop drive... couldn't
you set up a process to do a complete rsync/backup every x hours.... of
everything on the drive in use.


Well, yes, but one of the reasons you make backups is to cover the case
where you meant to type 'rm -rf something*' when you are in the root
directory and accidentally type 'rm -rf something *' instead. Or a
software bug that does something like that.



this would give a complete, always available backup that would always be
right at your arms ready!!!


Yes - but it would be even better if you rotated 2 such disks - or ran
over the network to another box.



ok.. so what would be needed to accomplish this!!


You can either do the obvious script that rsync's each partition and let
cron run it, or look up one of the packages that keeps some history,
like rdiff-backup.


--
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lesmikesell@gmail.com

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Old 11-10-2008, 10:37 PM
"bruce"
 
Default Linux backup help

exactly my thought!!!

and given that usb/laptop drives are cheap... i can always keep one by my
side, and rotate it with the working drive in the box...

should work ok...


-----Original Message-----
From: fedora-list-bounces@redhat.com
[mailto:fedora-list-bounces@redhat.com]On Behalf Of Les Mikesell
Sent: Monday, November 10, 2008 3:28 PM
To: Community assistance, encouragement,and advice for using Fedora.
Subject: Re: Linux backup help


bruce wrote:
> hi les/guys...
>
> assume you had/have a usb/external drive that was connected to the laptop.
> assume that it was also the same size (2.5") as the laptop drive...
couldn't
> you set up a process to do a complete rsync/backup every x hours.... of
> everything on the drive in use.

Well, yes, but one of the reasons you make backups is to cover the case
where you meant to type 'rm -rf something*' when you are in the root
directory and accidentally type 'rm -rf something *' instead. Or a
software bug that does something like that.

> this would give a complete, always available backup that would always be
> right at your arms ready!!!

Yes - but it would be even better if you rotated 2 such disks - or ran
over the network to another box.

> ok.. so what would be needed to accomplish this!!

You can either do the obvious script that rsync's each partition and let
cron run it, or look up one of the packages that keeps some history,
like rdiff-backup.

--
Les Mikesell
lesmikesell@gmail.com

--
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Old 11-10-2008, 10:50 PM
g
 
Default Linux backup help

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

bruce wrote:

> and given that usb/laptop drives are cheap... i can always keep one by my
> side, and rotate it with the working drive in the box...
>
> should work ok...

unless you;

> bruce wrote:

> Well, yes, but one of the reasons you make backups is to cover the case
> where you meant to type 'rm -rf something*' when you are in the root
> directory and accidentally type 'rm -rf something *' instead. Or a
> software bug that does something like that.

which would take out usb drive

> Yes - but it would be even better if you rotated 2 such disks - or ran
> over the network to another box.

which will cover you up to time that drive was rotated out.

- --
peace out.

tc,hago.

g
.

in a free world without fences, who needs gates.

learn linux:
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'HowtoForge' http://howtoforge.com/
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Comment: Using GnuPG with Red Hat - http://enigmail.mozdev.org

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Old 11-11-2008, 12:46 PM
Marc Schwartz
 
Default Linux backup help

Kevin Kempter <kevin@kevinkempterllc.com>
writes:

> Hi All;
>
> I'm awaiting a new linux laptop that will be my primary work machine. I want
> to implement a strategy that allows me as easily as possible to revert back
> to a former state. My primary concern is a scenario where I apply system
> updates and it breaks something that for me is critical.
>
> I wonder if a simple rsync script would work. If so, here's what I'm thinking:
>
> 1) updates are available so I execute the rsync script which pulls any updated
> files from my laptop to a backup server/drive
>
> 2) apply updates
>
> 3) if something breaks (even if I can no longer login) I boot the laptop, run
> the rsync script in the opposite direction (push files from the backup drive
> to the laptop)
>
> I assume that if I were to execute step 3 above that my system would be in the
> exact state that it was before I ran the updates. Is this a correct
> assumption ? Are there better approaches ?
>
>
> Thanks in advance..

Look at rsnapshot, which is rsync based and enables hourly, daily,
weekly and monthly rotating backups.

This is what I used on my laptop, to an external USB HD. It provides an
OSX Time Machine like schema, albeit without the fancy GUI.

http://rsnapshot.org/

HTH,

Marc Schwartz

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Old 11-11-2008, 12:46 PM
Marc Schwartz
 
Default Linux backup help

Kevin Kempter <kevin@kevinkempterllc.com>
writes:

> Hi All;
>
> I'm awaiting a new linux laptop that will be my primary work machine. I want
> to implement a strategy that allows me as easily as possible to revert back
> to a former state. My primary concern is a scenario where I apply system
> updates and it breaks something that for me is critical.
>
> I wonder if a simple rsync script would work. If so, here's what I'm thinking:
>
> 1) updates are available so I execute the rsync script which pulls any updated
> files from my laptop to a backup server/drive
>
> 2) apply updates
>
> 3) if something breaks (even if I can no longer login) I boot the laptop, run
> the rsync script in the opposite direction (push files from the backup drive
> to the laptop)
>
> I assume that if I were to execute step 3 above that my system would be in the
> exact state that it was before I ran the updates. Is this a correct
> assumption ? Are there better approaches ?
>
>
> Thanks in advance..

Look at rsnapshot, which is rsync based and enables hourly, daily,
weekly and monthly rotating backups.

This is what I used on my laptop, to an external USB HD. It provides an
OSX Time Machine like schema, albeit without the fancy GUI.

http://rsnapshot.org/

HTH,

Marc Schwartz

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