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Stephen Harris 06-23-2008 05:52 PM

Awk help
 
On Mon, Jun 23, 2008 at 11:25:45AM -0600, Joseph L. Casale wrote:
> I have csvde dump from active directory I process on my postfix mta.
> It takes output like this:
>
> "CN=Curtis xxx,OU=Domain Users,OU=xxx xxx,DC=xxx-xxx,DC=local",X400:c=US;a= ;p=xxx xxx xxx;o=Exchange;s=xxx;g=xxx;;SMTP:Cxxx@xxx-xxx.com
>
> and should return a relay_recipient map in the form of:
> Cxxx@xxx-xxx.com OK
>
> The command I am using is:
> cat $1 | tr -d " | tr ,
| tr ;
| awk -F: '/(SMTP|smtp):/ {printf("%s OK
",$2)}'

Use sed instead:
sed -n 's/^.*;;SMTP:(.*)$/1 OK/p' < $1

> Everything up to the awk is working, it drops the smtp: but its putting OK's all over the darn place.
> Anyone familiar enough with awk and printf that can suggest why this happens?

It works OK on the test line you provided; my guess is your datafile
has other lines that match "SMTP" in other fields of the source.

--

rgds
Stephen
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"Joseph L. Casale" 06-23-2008 06:30 PM

Awk help
 
>It works OK on the test line you provided; my guess is your datafile
>has other lines that match "SMTP" in other fields of the source.

Yeah when I echo'ed a single email into it everything was fine, but the file wasn't. I looked at
it in vi and saw all the dos carriage returns so added a tr -d '
' before the awk.

I will check out the sed statement, thanks!
jlc
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"Spiro Harvey, Knossos Networks Ltd" 06-23-2008 09:22 PM

Awk help
 
I have csvde dump from active directory I process on my postfix mta.
It takes output like this:
"CN=Curtis xxx,OU=Domain Users,OU=xxx xxx,DC=xxx-xxx,DC=local",X400:c=US;a= ;p=xxx xxx xxx;o=Exchange;s=xxx;g=xxx;;SMTP:Cxxx@xxx-xxx.com
and should return a relay_recipient map in the form of:
Cxxx@xxx-xxx.com OK
Everything up to the awk is working, it drops the smtp: but its putting OK's all over the darn place.
Anyone familiar enough with awk and printf that can suggest why this happens?


you can simplify that line down to:

awk 'BEGIN { FS=":" } /(smtp|SMTP)/ { printf "%-30sOK
", $NF }' $1

the -30 will make sure that everything aligns, because with just a tab
to separate the email addresses, you'll end up with a wonky OK column.
-30 pads out the first column to 30 characters.


also, I recommend changing the /(smtp|SMTP)/ to just /SMTP/ because if a
program is producing output like this from AD or LDAP, then the SMTP
will always be caps. You risk matching other lines in the log file that
don't match this format.


basically, this script separates a line by colons ':' and prints the
last field if the line fed to it contains 'smtp' or 'SMTP'. The $NF is
Number of Fields, so effectively prints the last field.





--
Spiro Harvey Knossos Networks Ltd
021-295-1923 www.knossos.net.nz

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"Joseph L. Casale" 06-23-2008 09:38 PM

Awk help
 
>you can simplify that line down to:
>
>awk 'BEGIN { FS=":" } /(smtp|SMTP)/ { printf "%-30sOK
", $NF }' $1
>
>the -30 will make sure that everything aligns, because with just a tab
>to separate the email addresses, you'll end up with a wonky OK column.
>-30 pads out the first column to 30 characters.
>
>also, I recommend changing the /(smtp|SMTP)/ to just /SMTP/ because if a
>program is producing output like this from AD or LDAP, then the SMTP
>will always be caps. You risk matching other lines in the log file that
>don't match this format.
>
>basically, this script separates a line by colons ':' and prints the
>last field if the line fed to it contains 'smtp' or 'SMTP'. The $NF is
>Number of Fields, so effectively prints the last field.


Well, the theory behind the case insensitivity is for users with more that one email address.
The primary is always caps, but secondary's are lower case.

Thanks for the pointer!
jlc
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ann kok 12-01-2010 08:09 PM

awk help
 
Hi all

Anyone can help to let me know how to

ls -1 | lsattr


ls -al /folder | awk '{ print $2}' | lsattr

Thank you


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Christopher Chan 12-01-2010 09:07 PM

awk help
 
On Thursday, December 02, 2010 05:09 AM, ann kok wrote:
> Hi all
>
> Anyone can help to let me know how to
>
> ls -1 | lsattr

lsattr `ls -1`

>
>
> ls -al /folder | awk '{ print $2}' | lsattr
>


for i in `ls -al /folder | awk '{ print $8}'`; do lsattr /folder/$i; done
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Ross Walker 12-01-2010 10:44 PM

awk help
 
On Dec 1, 2010, at 5:07 PM, Christopher Chan <christopher.chan@bradbury.edu.hk> wrote:

> On Thursday, December 02, 2010 05:09 AM, ann kok wrote:
>> Hi all
>>
>> Anyone can help to let me know how to
>>
>> ls -1 | lsattr
>
> lsattr `ls -1`
>
>>
>>
>> ls -al /folder | awk '{ print $2}' | lsattr
>>
>
>
> for i in `ls -al /folder | awk '{ print $8}'`; do lsattr /folder/$i; done

You can probably do that last one as a pipe to xargs instead of a shell loop.

-Ross

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Les Mikesell 12-01-2010 10:57 PM

awk help
 
On 12/1/2010 5:44 PM, Ross Walker wrote:
> On Dec 1, 2010, at 5:07 PM, Christopher Chan<christopher.chan@bradbury.edu.hk> wrote:
>
>> On Thursday, December 02, 2010 05:09 AM, ann kok wrote:
>>> Hi all
>>>
>>> Anyone can help to let me know how to
>>>
>>> ls -1 | lsattr
>>
>> lsattr `ls -1`
>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ls -al /folder | awk '{ print $2}' | lsattr
>>>
>>
>>
>> for i in `ls -al /folder | awk '{ print $8}'`; do lsattr /folder/$i; done
>
> You can probably do that last one as a pipe to xargs instead of a shell loop.

I'm missing something here. Why does lsattr need help from ls?

--
Les Mikesell
lesmikesell@gmail.com


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Christopher Chan 12-01-2010 11:19 PM

awk help
 
On Thursday, December 02, 2010 07:57 AM, Les Mikesell wrote:
> On 12/1/2010 5:44 PM, Ross Walker wrote:
>> On Dec 1, 2010, at 5:07 PM, Christopher Chan<christopher.chan@bradbury.edu.hk> wrote:
>>
>>> On Thursday, December 02, 2010 05:09 AM, ann kok wrote:
>>>> Hi all
>>>>
>>>> Anyone can help to let me know how to
>>>>
>>>> ls -1 | lsattr
>>>
>>> lsattr `ls -1`
>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> ls -al /folder | awk '{ print $2}' | lsattr
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> for i in `ls -al /folder | awk '{ print $8}'`; do lsattr /folder/$i; done
>>
>> You can probably do that last one as a pipe to xargs instead of a shell loop.
>
> I'm missing something here. Why does lsattr need help from ls?
>

It does not. I don't know why the OP is even trying to do it this way.
Just thought I'd demonstrate some bash stuff. :-p
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Stephen Harris 12-02-2010 01:37 AM

awk help
 
On Thu, Dec 02, 2010 at 08:19:51AM +0800, Christopher Chan wrote:
> It does not. I don't know why the OP is even trying to do it this way.

My guess: school work.

--

rgds
Stephen
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