FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > ArchLinux > ArchLinux General Discussion

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 09-11-2012, 11:47 PM
Jude DaShiell
 
Default almost got archlinux installed

When I boot the computer with the arch hard drive in it, the system waits
until I hit enter to start talking. Not a problem since it does talk but
only for a few seconds then espeak turns off. If I log in very quickly, I
get a root prompt. If I wait for a few seconds after that then espeak
goes off again. I did save the state of the sound card with alsactl
before rebooting the system too. I followed instructions for syslinux and
changed the lines in syslinux.cfg to point at /sda1 rather than sda3 as is
the default too which is why the system comes up as far as it now does.
Does syslinux run some kind of splash screen or screen saver by default
once it starts up? If so I may need to turn that off and then everything
should be working correctly. If what I read in syslinux.cfg is correct
users of the beginner's guide ought to be told to link or copy one of
those files from /boot/lib/syslinux into the /boot/syslinux directory I
didn't do that and that may be the cause for all of what is breaking now.
The syslinux-update command is mentioned twice and the first time it's
mentioned in the section on syslinux, it's mentioned too early since the
edits to /boot/syslinux/syslinux.cfg need to happen before the
syslinux-update command gets run unless that syslinux-update command
actually needs to be run twice for some reason.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------
jude <jdashiel@shellworld.net> Adobe fiend for failing to Flash
 
Old 09-12-2012, 02:08 AM
Kyle
 
Default almost got archlinux installed

According to Jude DaShiell:
# When I boot the computer with the arch hard drive in it, the system
waits until I hit enter to start talking.


Syslinux does run a boot menu, similar to the grub boot menu. You can
turn this off by adjusting the timeout setting in
/boot/syslinux/syslinux.cfg and/or by commenting out both ui lines. A
text-based menu (menu.c32) is uncommented by default, and vesamenu.c32
should already be commented. Having said this, the system should still
come up talking if you haven't pressed enter, because the boot menu only
runs for I believe 5 seconds by default.


# Not a problem since it does talk but > only for a few seconds then
espeak turns off. If I log in very quickly, I
# get a root prompt. If I wait for a few seconds after that then espeak
goes off again. I did save the state of the sound card with alsactl

# before rebooting the system too.

This sounds like a sound problem or maybe a kernel problem that is
entirely unrelated to syslinux. If the system is booting and starts
talking, then syslinux is doing its job. Are you running a strictly
command line system, or have you tried installing GNOME? GNOME requires
PulseAudio, which appears to mute some cards. Also, you may be able to
login just before GDM is started, which makes no sound. Try typing your
login name and password as you normally do and then try to run orca, if
indeed you have installed GNOME. If this doesn't work, and
alt-control-f1 doesn't get you back to a talking prompt, you may be
interested in the hack I posted to automatically unmute the master
channel once PulseAudio is started. If none of this works, or if you are
running a command line system without PulseAudio or GNOME, it's possible
your kernel is crashing after you press a Speakup key. For now, it is
still recommended to use the linux-lts package until the necessary
Speakup patch makes it into the mainline kernel, which is I believe
scheduled for the 3.6 release.


# I followed instructions for syslinux and changed the lines in
syslinux.cfg to point at /sda1 rather than sda3 as is

# the default too which is why the system comes up as far as it now does.

Yes. The syslinux.cfg file has fairly sane defaults, but does need to be
slightly modified on most installations, since the root of the
filesystem on many systems is /dev/sda1 or /dev/sda2 rather than
/dev/sda3. Still, I would recommend labeling your filesystems, usually
with the -L <label> option to the appropriate mkfs, and then using
/dev/disk/by-label/<label> as the root parameter in your kernel append line.


# Does syslinux run some kind of splash screen or screen saver by default
# once it starts up? If so I may need to turn that off and then everything
# should be working correctly.

See my comment above regarding the boot menu and how to turn it off. It
is usually recommended, however, to simply decrease the timeout, as you
may end up needing to arrow down one time to Arch Linux Fallback after a
kernel upgrade, which you would no longer be able to do if you
completely turn off the menu. A timeout value between 10 and 20 is
likely good enough in your case.


# If what I read in syslinux.cfg is correct users of the beginner's
guide ought to be told to link or copy one of

# those files from /boot/lib/syslinux into the /boot/syslinux directory I
# didn't do that and that may be the cause for all of what is breaking now.

syslinux-install_update -iam

will do this automatically. All files are linked in /boot/syslinux and
/boot/syslinux/syslinux.cfg is created automatically with its default
configuration and comments.


# The syslinux-update command is mentioned twice and the first time it's
# mentioned in the section on syslinux, it's mentioned too early since the
# edits to /boot/syslinux/syslinux.cfg need to happen before the
# syslinux-update command gets run unless that syslinux-update command
# actually needs to be run twice for some reason.

I can't figure why it needs to be run twice, unless you want to cover
all bases after a package upgrade. However, the first run should always
happen before editing /boot/syslinux/syslinux.cfg, since it rarely has
to run later. Note that like grub, editing the syslinux configuration
does not require the boot code to be rewritten. This is different from
lilo, which required an update of the MBR boot code every time any
change was made to the config file. Hope this helps.

~Kyle
 
Old 09-12-2012, 03:43 AM
Jude DaShiell
 
Default almost got archlinux installed

The system is only a c.l.i. system so far since I first get the command
line working then get interested in g.u.i. later maybe. I'll adjust those
timeouts down to about 20. The first time I got archlinux to boot it said
it failed to create a secured or secure file system so it may be possible
I should have left it alone for a while once I tried to reboot the drive.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
jude <jdashiel@shellworld.net>
Adobe fiend for failing to Flash
 
Old 09-14-2012, 08:24 AM
Jude DaShiell
 
Default almost got archlinux installed

First, the hack to force the sound card on and to be unmuted does work.
I put it into /etc/profile since that should apply to the whole system.
I did manage to get dmesg output saved to a file. I'll see if I can get
that copied to another place where it can be shared later. I failed to
create a user account as root though I'm pretty sure I'll be able to do
that with the installation disk in the drive running everything. What
happened to cause the failure was that speakup died and I couldn't get it
back to life just as the system said changing finger information. So I
never managed to finish creating that user account. What is going on that
should cause this, I do not know. When I tried mandb as root, speakup
also died and I never got the root prompt back and typing the reboot
command failed to speak as I typed it or to reboot the system. Failed to
create secure file system message went away after I changed ro to rw in
syslinux.cfg. Should /dev/sda3 have been mentioned in syslinux.cfg where
I have /home? If so, I didn't do that and this may explain some of the
difficulties. Finally, archlinux has to have enter hit once booted to
start talking and I had adjusted timeout from 50 down to 20 earlier. The
consolation prize for all of this is with each effected correction, the
problems get different which since speakup still speaks sometimes and the
system still boots probably points at some form of progress.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
jude <jdashiel@shellworld.net>
Adobe fiend for failing to Flash
 
Old 09-14-2012, 11:12 AM
Kyle
 
Default almost got archlinux installed

According to Jude DaShiell:
# Failed to create secure file system message went away after I changed
ro to rw in

# syslinux.cfg. Should /dev/sda3 have been mentioned in syslinux.cfg where
# I have /home? If so, I didn't do that and this may explain some of the
# difficulties.

The device mentioned in syslinux.cfg should refer to the root (/) of
your system. It usually should be mounted read-only when the kernel is
loaded, which is why the ro parameter is included at the end of the
kernal append line. The system then remounts everything rw later in the
boot process.


All your filesystems should be mounted in /etc/fstab. Did you run

genfstab -p /mnt >/mnt/etc/fstab

or similar, optionally including -U or -L, during the install process?
Doing so should have remounted / rw once the kernel was successfully loaded.


As soon as you can do so, it could help if you can post the dmesg output
you managed to save along with your latest syslog or systemd journal.

~Kyle
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 05:01 PM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org