FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor


 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 06-19-2012, 02:31 PM
Arno Gaboury
 
Default Arch as a web server

On 06/19/2012 04:20 PM, Bartłomiej Piotrowski wrote:

On 06/19/2012 04:14 PM, gt wrote:

Can you please elaborate how you manage the regular updates, especially
kernel, udev, glibc etc. Do you hold back the upgrades to packages which
require a restart?


This is exactly how I handle kernel updates. Afaik glibc and udev
updates don't require reboot.

gt pointed here a good point who honestly refrains me a litle bit from
using Arch, even if I feel comfortable with this distro and its community.
 
Old 06-19-2012, 02:40 PM
Paul Gideon Dann
 
Default Arch as a web server

On Tuesday 19 Jun 2012 16:31:49 Arno Gaboury wrote:
> On 06/19/2012 04:20 PM, Bartłomiej Piotrowski wrote:
> > On 06/19/2012 04:14 PM, gt wrote:
> >> Can you please elaborate how you manage the regular updates, especially
> >> kernel, udev, glibc etc. Do you hold back the upgrades to packages which
> >> require a restart?
> >
> > This is exactly how I handle kernel updates. Afaik glibc and udev
> > updates don't require reboot.
>
> gt pointed here a good point who honestly refrains me a litle bit from
> using Arch, even if I feel comfortable with this distro and its community.

I have a once-a-month scheduled reboot to take care of kernel upgrades. I
hold back linux and udev, because they tend to rely on each other.

ArchLinux does take quite a bit of time to keep up-to-date, but in my opinion
the inconvenience is *far* outweighed by the the simplicity of configuration,
building & customising packages, feeling of being in control, etc...

Paul
 
Old 06-19-2012, 02:43 PM
Dennis Herbrich
 
Default Arch as a web server

On Tue, Jun 19, 2012 at 04:31:49PM +0200, Arno Gaboury wrote:
> On 06/19/2012 04:20 PM, Bartłomiej Piotrowski wrote:
> >On 06/19/2012 04:14 PM, gt wrote:
> >>Can you please elaborate how you manage the regular updates, especially
> >>kernel, udev, glibc etc. Do you hold back the upgrades to packages which
> >>require a restart?
> >>
> >This is exactly how I handle kernel updates. Afaik glibc and udev
> >updates don't require reboot.
> >
> gt pointed here a good point who honestly refrains me a litle bit
> from using Arch, even if I feel comfortable with this distro and its
> community.

No need, really. You have multiple ways to deal with the rolling release model,
depending on your requirements regarding change management. For example:

* If you don't care about occasional, short downtime: Handle it like a desktop,
keep it current, reboot regularly with new kernel. This *may* cause additional
problems every now and then, though, and I wouldn't recommend this unless you
REALLY don't care about occasional downtime. If you're setting up VMs
anyway, this may be the way to go nevertheless, as you can quickly swap and
test VMs before going live.

* Use a kernel-lts package. This reduces your need for reboots
considerably already.

* If you're friend of the "stable repo" approach as in debianesque systems..
well.. create one! I'm doing this with great success so far. With a bit
of shell trickery you can stuff all packages of a running system into your
own repository, and you dub this stable. You may then choose to cherrypick
and test new package versions from core/extra/community, or roll your own if
there's a specific patch you'd want to have integrated, but not bump the
version altogether for whatever reason. The latter is actually required much
less often than I thought initially, as incompatible version upgrades are
relatively rare in the first place.

To sum it up, with Arch you can basically choose your own approach to
stabilizing your package sources. On the other hand, you will have to manage it
yourself, too, unless you find a "public" stable repository which you trust to
do the job well.

Best regards,
Dennis

--
"Den Rechtsstaat macht aus, dass Unschuldige wieder frei kommen."
Dr. Wolfgang Schäuble, Bundesinnenminister (14.10.08, TAZ-Interview)

0D21BE6C - F3DC D064 BB88 5162 56BE 730F 5471 3881 0D21 BE6C
 
Old 06-19-2012, 03:50 PM
Kevin Chadwick
 
Default Arch as a web server

> I have a once-a-month scheduled reboot to take care of kernel upgrades. I
> hold back linux and udev, because they tend to rely on each other.

I would have thought you could schedule a reboot via at that very night
for 4 in the morning or something. The reason I say this is that apart
from obvious security problems that get immediate media attention.
Kernel security problems often take weeks to filter through to published
security vulnerabilities partly due to Linus saying "a bugs a bug", no
effort is put into identifying them by kernel devs. On OpenBSD you don't
need to update the kernel because it's rock solid but unfortunately
there is no auto update either, otherwise I would be jumping up and
down telling you to use that.

>> Can you please elaborate how you manage the regular updates, especially
>> kernel, udev, glibc etc. Do you hold back the upgrades to packages which
>> require a restart?
>>
> This is exactly how I handle kernel updates. Afaik glibc and udev
> updates don't require reboot.
>
>>> gt pointed here a good point who honestly refrains me a litle bit from
>>> using Arch, even if I feel comfortable with this distro and its
>>> community.

Kernel upgrades and so reboots apply to all Linux variants so I don't
see how it affects your choice.

There must be a pure web server distro with a stripped down
kernel?

__________________________________________________ ______

Why not do something good every day and install BOINC.
__________________________________________________ ______
 
Old 06-19-2012, 09:21 PM
David Benfell
 
Default Arch as a web server

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On 06/19/12 05:58, satisficer wrote:
> On 2012-06-19, Arno Gaboury <arnaud.gaboury@gmail.com> wrote:
>> Is there any provider offering Arch distro, as it seems it is
>> hard, near impossible, to find one.
>
> Linode <https://www.linode.com/> is a VPS with Arch for USD
> 20/month. Easy to setup, and if you screw up something while
> tinkering, you can just nuke the image and install another one.
>
Linode also supplies its own kernel. To be honest, I haven't looked at
udev, so I can't speak to what they're doing there.

I have to say, I'm pretty happy with my Linode. The reliability has
been excellent and, on the whole, they're pretty easy to work with.
The one time I've encountered difficulty was in that they are now
requiring working SSL certificates for additional IPv4 addresses. And
of course, getting SSL working properly on a web server is its own
special kind of pain that seems to cause lots of people lots of problems.

- --
David Benfell
benfell@parts-unknown.org


-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v2.0.19 (GNU/Linux)
Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/

iQIcBAEBAgAGBQJP4O1HAAoJELT202JKF+xpQUMQAKXyI2izhj Ta1GVPGetSSMxJ
bxjpBw6Qm+dHOmQNuCAL182kiWpnzYfTlhrsFSCCLOenPB+bk1 yhdLhYwvYzRUka
vyWAQ3iZ5ewUBrYrz5ixGbtQo/yIn2r23EZnWOncyA9SjDoOZGiBGaNs1U0PiKwS
I0WU7EE5ozkFTBhpp/lBEJYQO65Qx4CKGH8HB7yybP6SlYteSMZo2ATCTPIuz/Gv
C2GMgT3OtYwvNtWFHVCCKJLOSjbRRyFVwwCZCmJPSQj1P3/bz+xgfEgiGVgrR/Gk
2aGRuFseDdUy3GzyHnFG66J7KwYESlLKi2I097nn4ATveSMpwA p+TRQgN5jLasrA
sWIvtrR3W6WE/kxLk2LaV/BjNWSglckq8GNHrFXqemxBiAGapRGKHL4yaMIUXnu2
5uRS4iCw2Xt00zBEnhVWJVYhtXqFnufU3Wc4UROCcfVYTDuPle cwB0v+ne0HFpBo
7qoumNdEt2bRigR/new1IFkX1PlNOYWSZq18rUSAfbuklZN8rZWnfbFh6Uk+du5j
JkmSrLr4khK+oTyOWuhG23k/iVfYSEiKmZmmPAyIESKyauJHvXHjNCjTvKOnUyjJ
3/5ODd4ZKJPBrMVQ6PiL0CmqQR69M4I1cCJ+sajuozlDhi6h62YN Ya+yVjM0jWY8
Laqzl2/IFggC1ETlN7i9
=ebAX
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
 
Old 06-26-2012, 12:30 PM
Martin Cigorraga
 
Default Arch as a web server

Hi guys, may be you'll find ArchServer an interesting project, you'll find
more here:
www.archserver.org.

The idea behind this project is to create a rock-solid,
server-oriented Arch flavor ready for
mass deployment with all the pros we love about Arch -easy to maintain,
lightweight,
ultra-stable, a joy to use, you know, The Arch Way- plus a well tested
repositories to
ensure no unexpected surprises (!) and the least manual intervention
possible while
remaining %100 Arch-compatible.

While the project have been around for quite some time, the lack of people
involved together
with real-life matters of it's lead devs and mantainers made Arch Server
slide into an
induced sleep for some time... until now.
In my last email exchange with Daniel (aka ShadowBranch, current AS
maintainer), about a
month ago, he made clear it's matter of time until the project is up and
fully running again -
undoubtedly he is not having the necessary spare time to setup everything
again and relaunch
the project.

So if you think ArchServer have any worthiness or is something interesting
-personally I would
_love_ to have a specific server-flavor of Arch- head on to the ML section
and subscribe
yourselves so you don't miss the grand reopening.

P.S.: I know this may sound like a cheap NTM[0]/sell speach but it's
not! I'm just a fan of the
idea of having a server edition of AL ready to deploy and forgot about it
because Arch rocks
and I don't really want to work with any other distros that isn't
Arch-centric; also I find inefficient
to have to learn the ways of other distros -which I don't like how they do
things- in order to
work with a production server.
For now I set up my Arch Linux server boxes by hand as the next archer
does, but I'm sure it
would be plain awesome to have an Arch branch specifically fitted for the
server role, it could
save me countless hours on deployment, management, testing, servicing,
etc., and I'm sure
it can do the same for all the rest of the archers

[0] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attack_marketing

Cheers!
 
Old 06-26-2012, 12:40 PM
d4n1
 
Default Arch as a web server

I'm has used the archlinux in all. My servers are running firewall, web,
bd, proxy, DNS, dhcp and others. I'm used politics of update/upgrade, and
mark some packages to not update/upgrade. I'm used only the oficial mirror
in the pacman. I'm removed compilers and run hardenings.
On Jun 26, 2012 9:31 AM, "Martin Cigorraga" <msx@archlinux.us> wrote:

> Hi guys, may be you'll find ArchServer an interesting project, you'll find
> more here:
> www.archserver.org.
>
> The idea behind this project is to create a rock-solid,
> server-oriented Arch flavor ready for
> mass deployment with all the pros we love about Arch -easy to maintain,
> lightweight,
> ultra-stable, a joy to use, you know, The Arch Way- plus a well tested
> repositories to
> ensure no unexpected surprises (!) and the least manual intervention
> possible while
> remaining %100 Arch-compatible.
>
> While the project have been around for quite some time, the lack of people
> involved together
> with real-life matters of it's lead devs and mantainers made Arch Server
> slide into an
> induced sleep for some time... until now.
> In my last email exchange with Daniel (aka ShadowBranch, current AS
> maintainer), about a
> month ago, he made clear it's matter of time until the project is up and
> fully running again -
> undoubtedly he is not having the necessary spare time to setup everything
> again and relaunch
> the project.
>
> So if you think ArchServer have any worthiness or is something interesting
> -personally I would
> _love_ to have a specific server-flavor of Arch- head on to the ML section
> and subscribe
> yourselves so you don't miss the grand reopening.
>
> P.S.: I know this may sound like a cheap NTM[0]/sell speach but it's
> not! I'm just a fan of the
> idea of having a server edition of AL ready to deploy and forgot about it
> because Arch rocks
> and I don't really want to work with any other distros that isn't
> Arch-centric; also I find inefficient
> to have to learn the ways of other distros -which I don't like how they do
> things- in order to
> work with a production server.
> For now I set up my Arch Linux server boxes by hand as the next archer
> does, but I'm sure it
> would be plain awesome to have an Arch branch specifically fitted for the
> server role, it could
> save me countless hours on deployment, management, testing, servicing,
> etc., and I'm sure
> it can do the same for all the rest of the archers
>
> [0] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attack_marketing
>
> Cheers!
>
 
Old 06-26-2012, 12:49 PM
Kevin Chadwick
 
Default Arch as a web server

> idea of having a server edition of AL ready to deploy and forgot about it
> because Arch rocks

Have you considered flavours like mail, web.

A recent thread showed atleast one person who probably would have liked
an out of the box web arch?


--
__________________________________________________ ______

Why not do something good every day and install BOINC.
__________________________________________________ ______
 
Old 06-26-2012, 05:00 PM
Martin Cigorraga
 
Default Arch as a web server

>
>
> Have you considered flavours like mail, web.
>
> A recent thread showed atleast one person who probably would have liked
> an out of the box web arch?
>
>
Sorry Kevin, I don't follow you.


--
-msx
 
Old 06-26-2012, 05:49 PM
Kevin Chadwick
 
Default Arch as a web server

> >
> >
> > Have you considered flavours like mail, web.
> >
> > A recent thread showed atleast one person who probably would have liked
> > an out of the box web arch?
> >
> >
> Sorry Kevin, I don't follow you.


probably because it's completely off the radar and probably projects
in themselves especially as your just getting back up and running.

This thread (feeling sheepish) about debian or arch being best for a
webserver got me thinking you could have an install package or iso for
different server types such as a web server version or mail server
version.

Then the answer on this thread could be because arch has a fully
functional and well setup (perhaps chrooted) web server out of the box.
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 08:40 PM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org