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Old 04-24-2012, 02:30 PM
Paul Gideon Dann
 
Default Why chsh behaviour differs from specified in manpage?

On Wednesday 25 Apr 2012 01:20:05 Dmitry S. Kravtsov wrote:
> So this it's either a bug in chsh or in its documentation. Does anyone has
> the same problem?

It seems to be working OK for me. I'm asked for my password, and then the
shell is changed in /etc/passwd.

> By the way, is it a typo in manpage: "for her own account"? Who is "her"?
> if we talk about user, there should be "his". But maybe I'm wrong, since
> english is definitely not my native language.

Some people like to use "her" instead of "him", but it's relatively rare. I
think some do this as a philosophical statement of gender equality, but I
expect there are other reasons too.

Paul
 
Old 04-24-2012, 02:35 PM
"Mantas M."
 
Default Why chsh behaviour differs from specified in manpage?

On 2012-04-24 17:20, Dmitry S. Kravtsov wrote:
> Today I messed around with zsh and login shells and found a strange thing -
> when I try to change my own login shell - chsh forbids me to do this:
>
> $ chsh -s /bin/bash
> You may not change the shell for 'kravitz'.
> $ whoami
> kravitz

What is your current shell, as shown by `getent passwd kravitz`?

chsh refuses the change if the current shell isn't in /etc/shells; this
is noted (a bit unclearly) under "NOTES" in the manpage.

> By the way, is it a typo in manpage: "for her own account"? Who is "her"?
> if we talk about user, there should be "his". But maybe I'm wrong, since
> english is definitely not my native language.

Since the user's gender is unknown, both 'his' and 'her' are common
usage, as well as 'his/her' and singular 'their'; this depends entirely
on the writer. (See, for example,
<http://english.stackexchange.com/q/48/3635>)


--
Mantas M. <grawity@gmail.com>
 
Old 04-24-2012, 02:45 PM
"Dmitry S. Kravtsov"
 
Default Why chsh behaviour differs from specified in manpage?

>What is your current shell, as shown by `getent passwd kravitz`?
Thank you, it's pointed out, that I accidently set "zsh" as login shell
instead of "/bin/zsh",
I changed it back to normal and everything works fine now.

I reread the NOTE and it's unclear that CURRENT login shell must be listed
in /etc/shells,
since I thought that it means NEW login shell must be listed there.

Cite:
NOTE
The only restriction placed on the login shell is that the command
name must be listed in /etc/shells, unless the
invoker is the superuser, and then any value may be added. An
account with a restricted login shell may not change
her login shell. For this reason, placing /bin/rsh in /etc/shells is
discouraged since accidentally changing to a
restricted shell would prevent the user from ever changing her login
shell back to its original value.


25 апреля 2012 г. 1:35 пользователь Mantas M. <grawity@gmail.com> написал:

> On 2012-04-24 17:20, Dmitry S. Kravtsov wrote:
> > Today I messed around with zsh and login shells and found a strange
> thing -
> > when I try to change my own login shell - chsh forbids me to do this:
> >
> > $ chsh -s /bin/bash
> > You may not change the shell for 'kravitz'.
> > $ whoami
> > kravitz
>
> What is your current shell, as shown by `getent passwd kravitz`?
>
> chsh refuses the change if the current shell isn't in /etc/shells; this
> is noted (a bit unclearly) under "NOTES" in the manpage.
>
> > By the way, is it a typo in manpage: "for her own account"? Who is "her"?
> > if we talk about user, there should be "his". But maybe I'm wrong, since
> > english is definitely not my native language.
>
> Since the user's gender is unknown, both 'his' and 'her' are common
> usage, as well as 'his/her' and singular 'their'; this depends entirely
> on the writer. (See, for example,
> <http://english.stackexchange.com/q/48/3635>)
>
>
> --
> Mantas M. <grawity@gmail.com>
>



--
Dmitry S. Kravtsov
 
Old 04-25-2012, 04:20 AM
XeCycle
 
Default Why chsh behaviour differs from specified in manpage?

"Dmitry S. Kravtsov" <idkravitz@gmail.com> writes:

> Hi,
>
> Today I messed around with zsh and login shells and found a strange thing -
> when I try to change my own login shell - chsh forbids me to do this:
>
> $ chsh -s /bin/bash
> You may not change the shell for 'kravitz'.
> $ whoami
> kravitz
>
> So it states, that I can't change login shell for current user, but lets
> look at manpage:
>
> DESCRIPTION
> The chsh command changes the user login shell. This determines the
> name of the users initial login command. A normal
> user may only change the login shell for her own account; the
> superuser may change the login shell for any account.

Have you messed with PAM? Sounds like you blocked yourself in
/etc/pam.d/chsh.

--
Carl Lei (XeCycle)
Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
OpenPGP public key: 7795E591
Fingerprint: 1FB6 7F1F D45D F681 C845 27F7 8D71 8EC4 7795 E591
 

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