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Old 07-14-2010, 02:21 PM
Nilesh Govindarajan
 
Default PCMCIA Kernel 2.6

How do I make kernel 2.6 boot from NFS using a PCMCIA network card?
Without initrd would be preferred.

--
Regards,
Nilesh Govindarajan
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nilesh.gr
Twitter: http://twitter.com/nileshgr
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Old 07-14-2010, 03:13 PM
Thomas Bächler
 
Default PCMCIA Kernel 2.6

Am 14.07.2010 16:21, schrieb Nilesh Govindarajan:
> How do I make kernel 2.6 boot from NFS using a PCMCIA network card?
> Without initrd would be preferred.

You need to build a kernel with PCMCIA, your PCMCIA host bridge and the
network card driver built-in ... that _might_ work, if the PCMCIA card
does not require userspace-based initialization. Additionally you need
to build in NFS support and kernel level NFS autoconfiguration.

This is much simplified if you use initramfs, mkinitcpio should be able
to do it, even with the default Arch kernel, you may need to add some
drivers manually though.
 
Old 07-14-2010, 03:39 PM
Nilesh Govindarajan
 
Default PCMCIA Kernel 2.6

On Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 8:43 PM, Thomas Bächler <thomas@archlinux.org> wrote:
> Am 14.07.2010 16:21, schrieb Nilesh Govindarajan:
>> How do I make kernel 2.6 boot from NFS using a PCMCIA network card?
>> Without initrd would be preferred.
>
> You need to build a kernel with PCMCIA, your PCMCIA host bridge and the
> network card driver built-in ... that _might_ work, if the PCMCIA card
> does not require userspace-based initialization. Additionally you need
> to build in NFS support and kernel level NFS autoconfiguration.
>
> This is much simplified if you use initramfs, mkinitcpio should be able
> to do it, even with the default Arch kernel, you may need to add some
> drivers manually though.
>
>


I can't use arch kernel because its too big for my diskless client.
Further, I don't see any PCMCIA option while compiling kernel 2.6
I tried kernel 2.4 also, it has the exact driver for my card, but then
glibc complains. Later I tried to compile glib with
--enable-kernel=2.4, won't compile.

So the only way out for me seems kernel 2.6
Could anyone provide me more info on compiling PCMCIA drivers right
inside vmlinuz image?
If not inside vmlinuz, with initrd.

--
Regards,
Nilesh Govindarajan
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nilesh.gr
Twitter: http://twitter.com/nileshgr
Website: http://www.itech7.com
Cheap and Reliable VPS Hosting: http://j.mp/arHk5e
 
Old 07-14-2010, 04:05 PM
bardo
 
Default PCMCIA Kernel 2.6

2010/7/14 Nilesh Govindarajan <lists@itech7.com>:
> Further, I don't see any PCMCIA option while compiling kernel 2.6

-> Device Drivers
-> Network device support (NETDEVICES [=y])
-> PCMCIA network device support (NET_PCMCIA [=n])

Hint: press / when in menuconfig and type your search string ;-)
 
Old 07-14-2010, 05:06 PM
Thomas Bächler
 
Default PCMCIA Kernel 2.6

Am 14.07.2010 17:39, schrieb Nilesh Govindarajan:
> I can't use arch kernel because its too big for my diskless client.

Okay.

> Further, I don't see any PCMCIA option while compiling kernel 2.6

They are there. More below.

> I tried kernel 2.4 also, it has the exact driver for my card, but then
> glibc complains. Later I tried to compile glib with
> --enable-kernel=2.4, won't compile.

You would need a very ancient glibc, version 2.2 or older iirc. Even if
you could glibc going, Arch Linux depends on Linux 2.6 in so many
places, 2.4 simply won't do it.

> So the only way out for me seems kernel 2.6
> Could anyone provide me more info on compiling PCMCIA drivers right
> inside vmlinuz image?
> If not inside vmlinuz, with initrd.

First, we need to clarify a few things: There are (16 Bit) PCMCIA cards
and (32 Bit) CardBus cards (which are often referred to as PCMCIA, too).
(I don't know if all the terminology is correct, please correct me if I
am wrong)

The PCMCIA variants require special drivers (they usually have 'cs' in
their name) and need initialization from userspace - this initialization
is done automatically by udev. However, these cards will not work
without initramfs, as the kernel cannot initialize them on its own.

The CardBus variants show up in the system as normal PCI cards and use
the same drivers as their PCI counterparts. They work out of the box and
you should be able to use them for booting without initramfs.

We first need to find out which one you have - the first variant will
show up in lspcmcia, the second one in lspci, but not in lspcmcia.
 
Old 07-15-2010, 06:58 AM
Nilesh Govindarajan
 
Default PCMCIA Kernel 2.6

Okay all, I found the option. I had hotplug disabled, so it was now
showing up. The / trick helped
I compiled the 3c589_cs driver into the vmlinuz image (loadable module
support disabled), but it doesn't seem to recognize the hardware.
As per Thomas, the initialization has to be done by initrd, but how
can a kernel and initrd fit on a 1.44 MB floppy?
and btw, udev is disabled in my install, I am using static /dev nodes.

--
Regards,
Nilesh Govindarajan
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nilesh.gr
Twitter: http://twitter.com/nileshgr
Website: http://www.itech7.com
Cheap and Reliable VPS Hosting: http://j.mp/arHk5e
 
Old 07-15-2010, 07:10 AM
Thomas Bächler
 
Default PCMCIA Kernel 2.6

Am 15.07.2010 08:58, schrieb Nilesh Govindarajan:
> Okay all, I found the option. I had hotplug disabled, so it was now
> showing up. The / trick helped
> I compiled the 3c589_cs driver into the vmlinuz image (loadable module
> support disabled), but it doesn't seem to recognize the hardware.
> As per Thomas, the initialization has to be done by initrd, but how
> can a kernel and initrd fit on a 1.44 MB floppy?
> and btw, udev is disabled in my install, I am using static /dev nodes.

If you try to boot via network, you could try to use gPXE - if you are
lucky, it has support for your network card (it supports very many
cards). gPXE can then load kernel and initrd via network (NFS, tftp,
http, ftp, whatever you like). gPXE usually fits on a floppy, even with
network drivers included.
 
Old 07-15-2010, 01:51 PM
Nilesh Govindarajan
 
Default PCMCIA Kernel 2.6

On Thu, Jul 15, 2010 at 12:40 PM, Thomas Bächler <thomas@archlinux.org> wrote:
> Am 15.07.2010 08:58, schrieb Nilesh Govindarajan:
>> Okay all, I found the option. I had hotplug disabled, so it was now
>> showing up. The / trick helped
>> I compiled the 3c589_cs driver into the vmlinuz image (loadable module
>> support disabled), but it doesn't seem to recognize the hardware.
>> As per Thomas, the initialization has to be done by initrd, but how
>> can a kernel and initrd fit on a 1.44 MB floppy?
>> and btw, udev is disabled in my install, I am using static /dev nodes.
>
> If you try to boot via network, you could try to use gPXE - if you are
> lucky, it has support for your network card (it supports very many
> cards). gPXE can then load kernel and initrd via network (NFS, tftp,
> http, ftp, whatever you like). gPXE usually fits on a floppy, even with
> network drivers included.
>
>


I don't think gPXE supports PCMCIA network cards. Leave all that, what
am I supposed to do to initialize the PCMCIA card?

--
Regards,
Nilesh Govindarajan
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nilesh.gr
Twitter: http://twitter.com/nileshgr
Website: http://www.itech7.com
Cheap and Reliable VPS Hosting: http://j.mp/arHk5e
 
Old 07-15-2010, 02:05 PM
Thomas Bächler
 
Default PCMCIA Kernel 2.6

Am 15.07.2010 15:51, schrieb Nilesh Govindarajan:
> I don't think gPXE supports PCMCIA network cards.

Sadly, I think you are right. gPXE would have allowed you to load
arbitrarily large kernel and initrd images over the network

> Leave all that, what
> am I supposed to do to initialize the PCMCIA card?

Udev does that automatically. Looking at it more closely, I think I was
wrong. pcmciautils only contains two tools called
"pcmcia-check-broken-cis" and "pcmcia-socket-startup". The former is
necessary to enable devices with broken vendor/product id, the latter
starts up some pcmcia sockets ... it looks like you can live without
those if your hardware is not broken. Details about pcmcia-specific
initialization are in /lib/udev/rules.d/60-pcmcia.rules (pcmcia-utils).

Guessing a bit further, it might be that you didn't build your PCMCMIA
host bridge into your kernel (most of the time it is yenta_socket) and
therefore don't see your card.
 
Old 07-15-2010, 02:32 PM
Nilesh Govindarajan
 
Default PCMCIA Kernel 2.6

On Thu, Jul 15, 2010 at 7:35 PM, Thomas Bächler <thomas@archlinux.org> wrote:
> Am 15.07.2010 15:51, schrieb Nilesh Govindarajan:
>> I don't think gPXE supports PCMCIA network cards.
>
> Sadly, I think you are right. gPXE would have allowed you to load
> arbitrarily large kernel and initrd images over the network
>
>> Leave all that, what
>> am I supposed to do to initialize the PCMCIA card?
>
> Udev does that automatically. Looking at it more closely, I think I was
> wrong. pcmciautils only contains two tools called
> "pcmcia-check-broken-cis" and "pcmcia-socket-startup". The former is
> necessary to enable devices with broken vendor/product id, the latter
> starts up some pcmcia sockets ... it looks like you can live without
> those if your hardware is not broken. Details about pcmcia-specific
> initialization are in /lib/udev/rules.d/60-pcmcia.rules (pcmcia-utils).
>
> Guessing a bit further, it might be that you didn't build your PCMCMIA
> host bridge into your kernel (most of the time it is yenta_socket) and
> therefore don't see your card.
>
>


Yes that was it, yenta_socket enabling recognizes the card, but
doesn't recognize it as an ethernet card (No Initrd, static kernel).

--
Regards,
Nilesh Govindarajan
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nilesh.gr
Twitter: http://twitter.com/nileshgr
Website: http://www.itech7.com
Cheap and Reliable VPS Hosting: http://j.mp/arHk5e
 

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