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Old 06-26-2008, 11:22 AM
Ralf Mardorf
 
Default Synthedit with wine

Peter Geirnaert wrote:
> Regarding the programming languages,
>
> C++ would be very interesting as development of third party modules
> for SynthEdit is also done in C++
> Maybe it's possible to make SynthEdit modules that are impossible to
> make for windows ?
> (e.g. a jack output module, I'm just brainstorming)
>
> Also LV2 and the Turtle language look very interesting,
> I guess a SynthEdit-like program for LV2 would be mmmmm
>
> btw, the link on the Turtle <http://www.dajobe.org/2004/01/turtle/>
> page to the definitive Turtle Grammar
> <http://www.dajobe.org/2004/01/turtle/sec-grammar> section goes to
> http://www.dajobe.org/2004/01/turtle/sec-grammar
> a page that only states:
>
> "Go away" .
>
> I think this is sort of funny, but not really very informative
> (more googles to do)
>
> I'll install faust version 0.9.8-1(stable) which I find in Synaptic,
> but clam only shows me some antivirus packages. (google todo)

I didn't read all the links myself. No, Turtle is an odd language. I
have to say that I never learned Turtle. I does Basic and Assembler, the
best languages IMO. I also learned C, C++ and Pascal and forget them,
because they are not very efficient, BUT you must know C and C++ for
UNIX like systems. Maybe that's why I have problems to be fine with
Linux. The problem with Assembler is, that you have to learn Assembler
for each CPU, PIC, DSP, because e.g. the different CPUs have different
commands, but most CPUs are using a command like "move register", only
some oldish will use the equivalent "load register and than save
register". As far as I know Turtle is more markup language like and IMO
it's better to learn "real" programming languages. I was also interested
in computer simulation of human intelligence when I was young. Knowing a
"real" programming language is a help for any kind of interest, e.g. you
won't be fine when doing researches about human intelligence by using a
language for AI. I recommend to learn a computer language that enables
everything and for Linux this is C and C++, no other language. I stopped
programming for Linux while programming "hello world" equivalents for
MIDI with ALSA and JACK, because I'm not fine with Linux, but I hope I
can surmount my reservations some day, if so, I would learn C and C++
again and "shellscribish", but never ever Turtle ... I guess .



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Old 06-26-2008, 11:49 AM
Ralf Mardorf
 
Default Synthedit with wine

There is a Java API called jjack but only a lowbrow will use it,
normally people will use the C API .

I might be arrogant, but Google search yourself and you will see, C and
C++ is most common for Linux. There are some dinosaurs that re-program
shell commands by using assembler, because they also not fine with that
"evil" C and C++ compilers and the findings that Linux C compilers does.

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Old 06-26-2008, 01:56 PM
"Peter Geirnaert"
 
Default Synthedit with wine

Ralf wrote: > I might be arrogant, but Google search yourself and you will see, C and


C++ is most common for Linux. There are some dinosaurs that re-program

shell commands by using assembler, because they also not fine with that

"evil" C and C++ compilers and the findings that Linux C compilers does.*To Google is a good advice and not arrogant imho, and I actually already started learning C++
sometime ago Thanks for the sharing of motivating experiences ;-)




Dave wrote: >The CLAM you want is here:


* http://clam.iua.upf.edu/


FAUST is here:


* http://faust.grame.fr/


You might also want to check out Albert Graef's Q project:


* http://q-lang.sourceforge.net/*mm, Q-Faust, Q-Midi, Q-Synth, Qt/Q , these look like cool tools too..



Best,



dp








Thanks for the links and all replies, I'll look at them all when I find the time,
it's become quit a list already.
I might stick to moving on with C++ first for a while

here are some of my bookmarks I'll share for any other newbie who's interested in the subject:

http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/
MIDI PROGRAMMING IN LINUX
LV2 programming for the complete idiot

http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial.html#c++tutorial
http://www2.its.strath.ac.uk/courses/c/

Pure Data Introduction for Ubuntu



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Old 06-26-2008, 09:00 PM
Ralf Mardorf
 
Default Synthedit with wine

Peter Geirnaert wrote:
>
> Ralf wrote: > I might be arrogant, but Google search yourself and
> you will see, C and
> C++ is most common for Linux. There are some dinosaurs that re-program
> shell commands by using assembler, because they also not fine with
> that
> "evil" C and C++ compilers and the findings that Linux C compilers
> does.
>
>
> To Google is a good advice and not arrogant imho, and I actually
> already started learning C++
> sometime ago Thanks for the sharing of motivating experiences ;-)

I might be arrogant because I'm adjudging some programming languages,
not because of my advice to use Google and to find out which programming
language might be the right one for you.

> here are some of my bookmarks I'll share for any other newbie who's
> interested in the subject:
> http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/
> MIDI PROGRAMMING IN LINUX
> <http://ccrma.stanford.edu/%7Ecraig/articles/linuxmidi/>
> LV2 programming for the complete idiot
> <http://ll-plugins.nongnu.org/lv2pftci/>
> http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial.html#c++tutorial
> http://www2.its.strath.ac.uk/courses/c/
> Pure Data Introduction for Ubuntu
> <https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HowToPureDataIntroduction>

Thank you. I can recommend to look for MIDI programming books for the
Commodore 64. I learned everything about MIDI from German C64 books.
There is less information about the C64, but everything about the UART
and ACIA, that are the MIDI interface chips and everything about the
MIDI standard. Using the APIs for ALSA and Jack, as far as I remember,
you don't have to care about the UART and ACIA and you don't need to
know about the whole MIDI standard, e.g. how to use running status. I
should try again to program in C++ for Linux, maybe it will be better
with my new hardware, because of one problem less to think about.
Programming for audio is much harder, because of all that Furier
mathematics. Good but free algorithms seems to be rare. I never does any
Furier algorithms myself, just doing sound sampling, recording and
playing isn't the whole stuff.

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